The kitsch destruction of our world, Benoit Paillé

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Ana Matallana

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I am the Creative Director of the Graphic Design Agency AMDG Studio.

Born in Murcia, Spain. I am graduated in Fine Arts at Art Center College of Design in Murcia, Spain. I moved to Los Angeles in 2001.

Photography is now part of my new artistic adventure. Just as writers use words and musicians use sounds, I am using photography to capture an instant in the life of a person. I take each picture out of time and I try to transform it into a permanent entity.

I treat color to each maximum brightness and saturation. In my photo portraits I am turning people into objects that can be symbolically possessed; we cannot possess the present but we can possess the past with these impressions of reality.

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Max Sauco

05-2006-Suok (elisey-and-his-cucumber)


05-2006-Suok (elisey-and-his-cucumber)

Was born in Irkutsk in 1969, after leaving school he entered the Irkutsk College of the Arts. From 1987 to 1989 he served in the Soviet army. In 1992 he degree in the professional graphic designer. Until 1998, he worked in painting, sculpture and photography. At the same time he studied plastic anatomy, psychology, esoteric, holds a professional astrologer, which influenced his future work. In 1998 he was admitted to the Union of Designers of Russia.

Flora Borsi

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Flora is a young fine art photographer from Hungary. She uses exquisite photo manipulation to create surreal images that are thematically focused on identity, relationships, emotions and dreams. Her immaculate technique and subtle conceptual ideas create beautiful evocations of universal emotions, from lust and desire to despair and loss.

Flora at once captures the complex strength and fragility of the human psyche. She expertly visualises dark fantasies and atmospheric dreams, utilising the uncanny and clever metaphor, while unlocking what it means to think, feel, dream and express in the urban world.
Her work often features the female body and she plays with hiding and revealing the eyes or face to leave only the feminine form,
exploring questions of female representation and the relationship between body and self.

Flora has exhibited internationally with solo exhibitions in Europe and the USA, and has most notably taken part in the “Continental Shift” group exhibition at Saatchi Gallery. She has also exhibited at the Louvre, France. Her ethereal aesthetic has won multiple art prizes and garnered critical acclaim from press including The Guardian’s Observer and BBC Culture. Her artwork was the face of Adobe Photoshop in 2014.

Kiyo Murakami

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I was born in Shizuoka, currently based in Tokyo, Japan. After I graduated from art school, I continued experimenting with various art – illustration, design, music, etc. But I found best way to express myself through the world of photography.

I find inspiration in paintings, music, and movies – old paintings and classic picture books in particular, but my most creative ideas come from my childhood memories and dreams. Some of my work are self-portraits, something I do not consider narcissistic, but rather an adventure in self-discovery that often has the benefit of being “therapeutic” as well.

I love to make collaborative work with talented people. my friends, musicians and performers – they’re helping my creativity as well.

Bear Kirkpatrick

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Bear Kirkpatrick’s forbearers were an ad hoc mixture of adventurer-navigators, naturalists, whalers, Puritans, dissidents, judges, and witches. He was born in the American south to a mother raised in Brahmin Boston and to a Harvard-educated geologist father who, several days after Bear’s birth, was sent across the world to war in the jungles of Southeast Asia. His upbringing was scattered across the Eastern seaboard, resting longest on a farm in New Hampshire during his teen years where he learned the survival skills of tracking, fishing, and hunting. He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, the University of Michigan, and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He has made his living by turns as a stone-wall builder, roofer, mason’s tender, bookkeeper, furniture builder, and video art installer.

Bear Kirkpatrick defines his imagery as evidence, documents of past and present human psychological states. He is presently working to develop a model to prove that acquired characteristics are not only inheritable as a result of natural selection and artificial selection, but also as the result of psychological selection as created by the environmental pressure of human memory.

Maurice Tabart

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Maurice Tabard was a dominant figure in avant-garde and modernist photography. His photo-montages, double exposures and solarized prints from the late 1920s and 1930s established him as a visionary artist.Tabard’s artistic formation originated with his father, a silk manufacturer and amateur photographer. After attended the Photographic Institute of New York, he honed his skills as a portrait photographer at the famed Bachrach studios. In the spirit of furthering his career he moved to Paris in 1928. Shortly after his arrival, Philippe Soupault, author and co-founder of the Surrealist movement, introduced him to Lucien Vogel. Vogel, an editor and publisher, helped Tabard to establish himself as fashion, portrait and advertising photographer. Tabard’s work appeared in numerous fashion magazines including Jardin des Modes, Harper’s Bazaar, Figaro des Modes, Elle and Vogue. Charles Peignot, founder of Arts et Métiers Graphique, was impressed by Tabard’s solarizations and hired him as studio director of Deberny-Peignot.Throughout the 1930s-1950s, Tabard continued to experiment with his personal work. His successes in this area led him to become one of the most popular avant-garde photographers of the time.

Teresa Visceglia

Teresa Visceglia (5)

Amazement in the face of everyday life events and ordinary things is my favourite starting point. Moments of astonishment like the ones in dreams where beauty is often twisted by some weird feeling and when the Bad is unexpectedly whispering sweet nothings.

Teresa Visceglia

Recycle series, Jean-François Lepage

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2014_lepage_recycle_16_750px

Jean-François Lepage (b.1960) is a photographer whose working methods are closer to that of a painter. His paradoxically alluring and disquieting photographs bare evidence to a process in which he physically cuts, draws and works into their surface to intricately evolve and brutally deconstruct the original image. Lepage’s intuitive approach to the image-making process is cathartic. “I’m like a surgeon who faces his patient with lucidity and commitment but with the absolute certitude that the only person I can really save is — myself.” Over the past three and a half decades, since his first published images appeared in Depeche Mode, he has chosen to work sporadically for editorial and advertising clients, while taking time — including a 13-year period of abstinence from commercial environs — to pursue his art through painting in a purer form. Subsequently, Lepage has maintained his distinctive voice as his imagery has evolved. More recently he has begun to pull away from fashion once more. He is currently making new work, recycling photographs from his archive to build new pictures — finding his palette by cutting up outtakes from his old shoots of now discontinued 8×10, 891 Polaroid from the 1990s.