Jörg Heidenberger

Home
Facebook

Roberto Kusterle

Roberto Kusterle was born in Gorizia in 1948, where he still lives and works.

He began with painting and installation in the 1970’s, before identifying photography as the ideal means for his artistic expression.

During the following years the principal themes of his poetics emerged: a continuity between the human, animal and vegetable world, the mediating role of the body, the negation of the gaze, the constant practice of irony, ambiguity and displacement to shape an idea and to make the viewer wonder.

Photography is used to maintain the tension between fiction and reality. Kusterle has a very personal approach to the camera: the actual taking of the picture is only the last step in a complex and articulated creative process.

Utami Dewi Godjali

From Indonesia, born in Jakarta with the nick name “Memi”. Know and love photography since high school, went to college majoring in Public Relations. Currently works as a freelance photographer, has attended several joint exhibitions in Indonesia and the Netherlands.

Home

Luis Beltrán

Luis Beltrán tells the stories of his daydreams through his latest body of digital print photographs. These quietly seductive works hold a deep and moving quality of innocent desire. Figures appear at the ends of alleys, above cityscapes, and up trees; they draw you towards them, making the eye chase its new companion. Beltrán’s photos produce a dreamlike sensation, the product of their deeply saturated, yet muted, coloration. While objects around the periphery of the central image maintain a luscious intensity with their dark shadows and full mid-tones, the focus shifts as the eyes finds a hazy subconscious perspective. The figures which are central to this misty state call feelingly to the viewer. Beltrán has created a world that captures a sense of the ‘other,’ and speaks to the mind’s natural curiosity. His photos call to a place within us all and echo the inner child’s adventurous and courageous nature.

Yulia Napolskaya

 

I am not a good writer, so I express myself in pictures. In photography, there are artists, there are traders, there are singers of the female body, there are masters of horrors, as touch me — I am a clown. I like to amuse people and to propose them small puzzles. My spectators invented the name of the my art direction -“scenic photoart” and they are right. My works are mainly the stories, tales and anecdotes. The photo should carry some sort of message and not just a pretty picture. It is Great Art to be able to express own thoughts through visuals so that its could be clear to spectators. Laugh and irony, it is the most direct and effective way to deliver serious thought to the most people. Humor will save the world

Website

Lori Vrba

I was raised in a small, back-woods Southeast Texas town.  I did not grow up with an exposure to art.  I did not have an uncle with a darkroom.  I didn’t really hold a camera until I was a grown woman.  I am a self-taught artist committed to film and the traditional wet darkroom.  I work intuitively in every creative element of my medium with an acute awareness of what and who has come before me.  My life experiences have brought me to this place where I find myself overwhelmed with the drive to make photographs about who I am…what moves me, what I feel inside, what I believe to be sacred and enduring.  I make pictures to challenge, calm, excite and satisfy my mind and heart.  I share my work in hopes of leaving some permanent, telling mark on the world…that I Was Here.

Jonė Reed

Jone Reed‘s black and white photographs are as alluring as they are haunting. Whether it’s the blur of a body or the depth of shade and shadow, Reed has a natural ability to provoke emotion with her work. Describing photography as “the expression of artistic freedom,” her work transports the viewer to a place of atmospheric attraction

Sophie-Anne Herin


Sophie-Anne Herin begins her artistic career in Bologna, where she graduates at Dams.

She works as an actress in various theater companies, participating also in some theater productions with the Navile Theatre.

In 2006 she moves to France in Paris : here she continues her artistic training by studying Barbara Dauville’s Drama Therapy and she pursues her research on the body at Peter Goos Center of Dance.

In 2008, by meeting the artist Marino Catalano, she approaches photography: a study that she will deepen by attending the Master of Photography at Turin’s European Institute of Design, choosing in this way to side with the viewer, to stay with those out from the scene, those watching at, those waiting for what happens or “falls

Karina Marandjian

Home

Harold Eugene Edgerton

 

 

 

 

 

Harold Eugene Edgerton, born in Fremont, Nebraska, on April 6, 1903, was the inventor of stroboscopic photography. Beginning in 1921, he studied electric engineering at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, later at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. There he worked as an assistant in 1927 and from 1928-68 as a professor. Edgerton’s uncle taught him the basics of photography when he was 15.

Arno Rafael Minkkinen

 

Many of my photographs are difficult to make. Some can even be dangerous. I do not want to have someone else coming in harm’s way taking the risks I need to take: to lean out off a cliff or stay underwater for the sake of my picture. We control how much pain we can tolerate; such information is unknowable by anyone else. Some of my pictures might look simple, but in reality they can test the limits of what a human body is capable of or willing to risk. Thus I title them self-portraits, so the viewer knows who is in the picture and who took it.
Home

Guardar

All Bodies Are Beautiful, Thomas Dodd

Thomas Dodd is a visual artist and photographer based out of Atlanta, Georgia who has developed a style that he calls “painterly photo montage” – a method he employs in editing software in which he crafts elaborately textured pieces that have a very organic and decidedly non-digital look to them. His work often has mythic and quasi-religious themes that pay homage to Old Master art traditions while at the same time drawing from psychological archetypes that evoke a strong emotional response from the viewer.
Although his artwork resembles paintings, his pieces are entirely photographic in nature, fusing many images into a cohesive whole. His larger works are often presented in a mixed media form that adds a depth and texture that complements the photography beautifully.

Thomas began his career as a visual artist in 2005. Before that, he was best known as the harpist and songwriter for the 1990s musical group Trio Nocturna, a Celtic Gothic ensemble that put out three critically-acclaimed albums (“Morphia”, “Tears of Light” and “Songs of the Celtic Night”) and performed at author Anne Rice’s annual Halloween balls in New Orleans, as well as spawning an offshoot band called the Changelings. Thomas also played harp on two albums by Michael Gira (the driving force behind the influential post-punk band the Swans) – “the Body Lovers” and the Angels of Light “New Mother”.
The images that Thomas creates are basically a visual equivalent of the music he composed in the 1990s. Mythic themes and their relation to emotions and psychological states continue to be his primary subjects and motivations

Guardar

Dreams, Michał Giedrojć

Most of us loves balancing on the border of our own desires and reality. Everyone has own dreams , creates a world, people and places through the eyes of unbridled imagination. That is what concerns the series „ Dreams”. These black & white artistic photographies, infecting an intriguing look at everything that surrounds us, what is or may become a cause of labor of the mind, thoughts, imagination, illusions. In this creative photography series, dreams turn out to be extremely moody frames which combines the minimalism and incredible attention to detail, realism and surrealism, anxiety with aplomb. These are the adversities that are in contact with each other on the border of two worlds, they show various possibilities which open up our imagination, creative vein, and above all, (un)realistic dreams. The main roles in my experimental photography play the photo heroes. Portraits are very physical, tangible indeed, specific, full of expressiveness and individual character. Their existence clearly distinguished in the foggy landscapes, nostalgic entourage, lyricism and intimacy interiors and places to which they were assigned or simply grasp just there. In fact, we can not be quite sure whether the surrounding world belongs to them or perhaps they were placed in it intentionally, specially pushed into another reality. In additional, there are often quite strange attributes with which they have to overcome. It is worth to notice puzzling gestures or specific set of silhouettes. Characters are trying to communicate something, speak with their eyes, signs, they send signals. Looking at the every creative photography you can ask yourself: is it real or dream? Where are these romantic views from, who are these people, why is it made on this way? A lots of questions. Questions can therefore be the basis to reflect on the reality of dreams and how huge can be human imagination, to what does it lead, what do our dreams tell. In this case, the creator of the various worlds is the author of this experimental photography, it is up to him the stay of every person, he is the master each of the perpetuated situations. This kind o artistic photography, seemingly having to be documentation of reality, becomes some reflection of fantasy, fun and stare into each other, making own surrealist thoughts which might have a chance to be represented in the real world. But it only depends on the individual viewer’s gaze to the dreamy theme

Home

Guardar

Helen Warner

Helen Warner is a fine art photographer and film-maker living and working in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Originally from Toulouse in the South West of France, Helen is a graduate of The Queen’s University of Belfast where she mastered in Cinema and Modernism. Her photography is deeply influenced by story telling, supernaturalism, and the irish landscape. With the use of inexpensive materials and props, Helen manages to create fantastical and emotive images which seem to capture the crescendos of many untold stories. Helen has recently moved into the realm of film making, having directed her debut short film ‘pollen’. It has recently made it into the official selection for the aesthetica short film festival in november 2016.

Guardar

Youngho Kang

Youngho Kang was born in 1970, Seoul, South Korea.

He is well known as a commercial photographer in South Korea.
His nickname is “Dancing Photographer”, a nickname given to him because of his unique shooting style, which is that while taking pictures he communicates with the model through dancing, or very much as a conductor, with music always playing in the background.

He graduated from Hongik University, where his major was French Literature, which means that he has no special education in photography, but he still managed to in a short time become the top photographer in the commercial area. In this case he confesses that he was very lucky, getting chances like these.
Given this, he has a powerful planning ability that is based in the humanities, which shines through in his directing ability that makes for compelling stories being visible in the pictures, as well as a unique ability of communicating, that extracts the inner, hidden expressions from a person.
This, together with his luck, makes him the photographer he is.

Starting 2009, he extended his imagination towards fine art. This was the beginning of his unique works, titled “99 Variations”. In this work, he is taking pictures while facing the mirror while at the same time dancing and making changes to himself in various ways. And in 2012 he produced a unique documentary work titled “Who is she?”, in which he was photographing the President’s back side. Through this work he extended his genre of photography.

In 2014, having found his own definition of art to be “a passionate effort that only he can do”, he is going into a new adventure, in which he is reaching beyond the identity of a photographer. He held a performance work, titled “99th Variation”, where he was in-between being a photographer, a performance artist, a media artist, all kinds of artists, in National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea. He is now working while at the same time holding lectures on the “Oxymoronic power, Imagination”, in universities.

Save

Save

Christophe Huet

French retoucher Christophe Huet is a true photoshop Master! His work is fascinating. He is the one who creates the famous advertising for Playstation, but also some for Nike, Motorola, Surfrider Foundation….

Elene Usdin

 

“I was terrified of my dolls when I was little. I used to think they came alive at night, that they’d open their eyes and come at me. I used to have nightmares,” says French photographer Elene Usdin of the time she and her family lived in Quebec.

“I was four and we were living in a house in Canada; my father is a doctor, and whenever he worked late and my mother found herself alone in this big house with the three of us, she’d start to worry about prowlers and vampires and other fantasy creatures that just aren’t real.

“That’s probably why I had so many nightmares about my toys – I think I felt all her fears. But it’s also how I learned to create my stories.”

Featuring her naked self in her carefully staged shots, Usdin takes the notion of “woman as object” and transforms it into a farcical representation.

Many of her self-portraits can perhaps best be described as the ‘mockification of objectification’, a piss-take of the tiresome consumerisation of the female body.

“I’m trying to express a different representation of the female form,” she says. “The stereotypes are very strong, and they’re always the same, so I try to present them in a funny way – as something surreal. It’s not meant to be serious at all.”

A graduate of École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, Usdin painted cinema sets and worked as an illustrator in Paris before discovering image-making in 2003.

Her boyfriend at the time was a photographer; one day she picked up his camera and started taking pictures. To her, it was merely an amusement at first – something to pass the time – but she soon realised that she could create stories using a camera, just as she did using illustration and paint.

“Then I really became passionate about photography,” she says. “It gave me a new perspective on making stories, but I felt I had so much to learn. I can’t really explain why, but I created a sort of personal universe, an ‘autofiction’, using a new medium.”

When Usdin first started taking self-portraits more than a decade ago, she lacked confidence in her work, and in herself, and often questioned her ability to convey what she wanted to express. So she placed herself at the centre of each frame, experimenting with lighting, composition and setting.

“I was trying a lot of things by myself because I didn’t feel certain enough about what I was creating to ask anyone for help,” she says. “I was too shy and I didn’t trust my own work, so I used a tripod and a shutter button with a long wire to take the photos. In fact, if you look carefully at my self-portrait with the lampshade, you can see the wire.”

Usdin considers herself more “plastician” than photographer, because creativity is really just a game – “a very passionate game”. She describes the composition of her images as a dance, where all things convene. “They are a choreography of the body and the objects that surround it – a mattress, a chair, a window. Everything is linked, and there are no empty spaces.”

She often craves time alone, she says, and when she does she’ll jump on the first train out of Paris. “One weekend I boarded a train to Marseille and ended up staying in Hotel Peron near the sea. It’s a beautiful, strange place, full of nostalgia. That’s where I took the picture with the phone. In it, I hide my face and become a sightless figure, with no visible expression, a slack body, loose hand. It was my way of expressing my feelings about my boyfriend at the time – waiting for a phone call that never came.”

In another image she wears a strap-on penis and play-acts as a man. “It’s a playful photo. I pretend to be a man. He’s a sweet, tender man, with a pink wool penis. A gender mix. In a bedroom, an act of seduction – an invitation to a sex game – but in a kitsch, sweet way. It’s also an interpretation of what people believe to be true of women and men. Women are often thought of as tender and lovely, and men powerful and rude. It’s a schematic feeling, of course, but in the representation of women and men in advertising, for example, it’s exactly like that, even today. That image makes a joke of it.”

Usdin won the Prix Picto for young fashion photographers in 2006 and her self-portraits have exhibited at Arles, as well as Farmani Gallery in Brooklyn, Robert Berman Gallery in Santa Monica and elsewhere. Today, her work is a fusion of her two passions – photography and painting. Femmes d’intérieur, which is currently on show at Galerie Esther Woerdehoff in Paris, is a series of painted photos that questions the representation of women in classical art by focusing on the ‘codes’ used to define her status – her attire, how her hair is styled, the expression on her face. “The idea of painting ‘in the style of’ – copying the classics – is a way of making each photograph unique. It’s an additional way of personifying each of these women, of giving them back their difference and originality,” she writes on her website.

“When I’m travelling, I always have my camera with me so I can take self-portraits in hotel rooms as memories – to remember that I was there. Some of the self-portraits in the hotels are from those travels. After all, we are the main actors in our lives,” says Usdin, “everything else is merely composed around us.”

Home

Michael Taylor

Save

Home

Barbara Kosakowska

Barbara Kosakowska was born in Cracow, Poland.

Young photographer and visual artist, interested  in issues of biology, pathology and botany, well fairy tales and novels of somewhere between reality and dream.

Currently studying graphic on Jan Matejko Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow, took part in several group exhibitions in Poland.

Michael Ackerman

1








Michael Ackerman, is an American photographer. Born in 1967 in Tel Aviv. Lives in Warsaw.
Since his first exhibition, in 1999, Michael Ackerman has made his mark by bringing a new, radical and unique approach. His work on Varanasi, entitled “End Time City,” breaks away from all sorts of exoticism or any anecdotal attempt at description, to question time and death with a freedom granted by a distance from the panoramic – whose usage he renewed – to squares or rectangles.
In black and white, with permanent risk that led him to explore impossible lighting, he allowed the grainy images to create enigmatic and pregnant visions. Michael Ackerman seeks – and finds – in the world he traverses, reflections of his personal malaise, doubts and anguish. He received the Nadar Award for his book “End Time City” in 1999, and the Infinity Award for Young Photographer by the International Center of Photography in 1998.
In 2009, he won the SCAM Roger Pic Award for his series “Departure, Poland”.
His last book “Half Life” has been published in 2010 by Robert Delpire.
Michael Ackerman is represented by Gallery VU’

Guardar

Guardar