Petr Flynt

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Granted, I might list several photographers whose work is distinctly non-classical. Consider for example Petr Flynt and Evir Bogdan. Their work is inventive, imaginative, unique, exciting, and just plain wonderful. A feast for the eyes and reflective of a photographic intellect at work that transcends the concept of “classic.” If I photographed like them, I might harbor aspirations of being included in the collections of MoMA, the Art Institute of Chicago, or possibly merely the superb photo collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
I don’t, however. My mind doesn’t work like theirs (obviously).
I do pretty good work. Perhaps, compared to Flynt and Bogdan, my work is merely “classic.”

I studied the faculty of medicine at Palacký University in Olomouc and I studied human body in depth. I bought my first own camera and started to ‘create’. At least I thought so.

The sometimes bizarre settings of the photos combined with the exceptional way his models pose made me feel like I was in an early 20th century horror movie. Once I overcame this ‘first fear’ I could see symbolic and double meaning in his work. It is not erotic in a way of sexually stimulating, it is erotic in the way the photographer seems to take the general nude acceptance to another level.

I like his eyes, his light, his composition (correct word ? don’ forget, I’m french…), his ways to catch the inside. He tells us something new, as an artist has to make it, with his own words, and I love that, for sure, I love that, I’m a writer…

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Pierre Fudarylí

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Jenny Papalexandris

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“What is real is not the external form, but the essence of things… it is impossible for anyone to express anything essentially real by imitating its exterior surface” Constantin Brancusi, Sculptor.

Jenny Papalexandris is a Visual Artist based in Australia. She holds a Master of Art (1997) and a Bachelor of Education (Art) 1987 from the University of NSW in Sydney. She works across three main disciplines; Photography, Sculpture and Painting. She has established a visual language that allows her to extend her ideas across all three mediums.

The photography of Jenny Papalexandris explores a subjective response to the world of light and shadow. The photographs are highly expressive and visually commanding. Thematically rich and diverse, her photography is imbued with a strong sense of poetry, symbolism and metaphor.

Her work as a Sculptor investigates her immediate natural environment. The sculptures are part of an ongoing investigation which explore organic growth and the structure of form. Her intention is to create work which speaks about the air, the salt, the clouds, the sea, the leaves and the earth. She aims to transcend physical resemblances and truly abstract felt experience to create essential forms.

Painting further consolidates and refines the scope and ideas within the work. Her paintings can be deeply saturated with colour and luminosity. In them one traces the lyrical outlines and moods of a landscape. The common thread in her work is the impulse to ‘sense’ rather than ‘see.’ Her work reveals a singular vision explored with rigour and sensitivity, both visually and conceptually.

Jenny Papalexandris continues to exhibit both nationally and internationally. She has been the recipient of numerous Art Awards. Her work has been included in various publications and media.
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Never Home, Bilo Hussein

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When I was growing up in Saudi Arabia, my Sudanese parents often reminded me that the county we lived in was not our home. It was only years later that I understood the implications of this – that it might become impossible for me to belong to any culture and that there was no place I could comfortably call home. These grownup feelings are the basis for Never Home.

Never Home is an ongoing project driven by the sense of segregation in religion, culture and gender that I experienced as a child in Saudi Arabia. I also express my continuing wish to find a place where I can fit in regardless of belief. Yet, as a third culture individual I often wonder if home is the place where you physically spend the most of your life? Is it a place you feel you belong to? Or is simply a country that you are a citizen of?

The judgmental way of life in which I was forced to participate as a child was the catalyst that led me to pick up a camera and use it to connect with people I had previously not been allowed to accept. Rather than trying understand the meaning of home through my own feelings and thoughts, I chose to create portraits of women such as myself, who had recently moved to New York City from a different background than my own.

To find these women, I started with my immediate circle of acquaintances, and then began to reach out to strangers. I ask them all if they felt they had been able to find the same level of comfort to New York City. I asked them if they felt they belonged here, if they considered it home, and if they still missed the place they’d come from. In asking these questions I discovered our commonalities as women, regardless of origin.

As I went on to arrange and shoot the portraits, I directed my subjects to think about their formative experience in their culture of origin – on the good and the bad. I found myself almost subconsciously placing them next to a window, for reasons beyond its value as a light source. I came to the realization that they were really me sitting by the window as a child, locked up in our house in Jeddah wondering if I were ever to leave this place if would find another land I could honestly call home. I realized that I was trying to find myself in others and that the photographs were introspective, and almost like self-portraits.

The layers of additional images and textures I incorporate into these images in post processing are meant to evoke the very thoughts and feelings of my subjects. These layers consist of places and patterns I have fallen in love with since my own move to New York City. These internal images are meant represent the process of coming to accept a new culture as one’s own, which I myself am slowly doing. But they are also saying that inside each displaced person is an abundance of emotion, thought and experience that in many cultures women are not allowed to share.

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Anton Solomoukha

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Anton Solomoukha was born in Kyiv, Ukraine. He graduated from the Kyiv
State Art Insitute , and worked as a muralist until his emigration to Paris, France in 1978. Since then he has exhibited his work internationally, including exhibits in the United States (New York, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Washington DC), Germany (Cologne, Munich), and France (Paris,Lyon,Toulouse,Nante,Metz,Strassbourg….). He continues to live and work

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Laura Makanbresku

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Anthony Mirial

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Alexey Bednij

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Clownville, Eolo Perfido

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Eolo Perfido is a 44 years old, french born, advertising and portrait photographer based in Rome, Italy
He run one of the biggest photo studio in Rome and in the last decades he collaborated with several international advertising and comunication agencies such as JWT, Saatchi & Saatchi, Leo Burnett, Young & Rubicam, BBDO, United 1861, Grey and Blossom Communication.
Eolo Perfido photography has been featured in magazines such as NY Times, Communication Arts, Panorama First, Vision, Vogue Russia, GQ Russia, Comunication Arts, L’Espresso, and Computer Arts and he worked for several international clients like Pepsi Cola, Samsung, Kraft, Gatorade, Sky Television, Novartis and Opel.

In the beginning his career he has been honored to assist on the field photographers like Steve McCurry, Elliott Erwitt, Eugene Richards and James Nachtwey in several of their shootings in Europe, Africa, Asia and South America.

In 2011, the italian magazine L’Espresso has chosen along with other 9 young Italians creatives who have been asked to tell through a picture the 150th anniversary of the Unification of Italy.

Eolo also follows a personal artistic journey that leads him to exhibit in numerous private galleries. Among his most successful series is definitely the photographic series Clownville, recently exhibited in a solo show at Galleria Janet Coast of Recife in Brazil during the International Circus Festival.

His creative path has allowed him to win several major awards in the field of creative photography.

In 2009 he was awarded the first prize of the National Association of Italian Professional Photographers Tau Visual for the creative quality of its images.

In 2010 he was awarded the “Best International Photographer” during the exhibition “Photo Vernissage” which was held at the Manege Museum in St. Petersburg, which saw the participation of hundreds of photographers from around the world.

In 2016 he created Storm Studio a Digital Artists collective specialized in Creative Retouching, Digital Imaging, Advertising Still Visuals, Post Production and 3D CGI.

Rituals, Jack Montgomery

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Michał Giedrojć

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Age group 1980, artist-photographer from Poland, student of Photography at the University of Arts in Poznań, for many years in the photographic branch. He had so many exhibitions – both individual and group, in Poland and abroad. Publications of his works were shown for years in many magazines around the world. He is a laureate of many competitions – especially those of international importance. He cooparate with various artists, also willingly shares his experience with other adepts of photographic art, leads workshops and meetings.

First of all, he is interested in creative photography. All photos represent his own, subjective view of reality, people, places. In works he gives you the possibility to get to know his visions, his perception of the world, the unreal world. Most of them are based on graphically manipulated images, the vision is filtered by sensitivity. Situation presented in artistic photography never happened and were only created by author’s imagination and dreams. The quality, the consequence, the imagination – this is very important to him in photography, especially experimental photography. He likes this kind of conflict between what is realistic and what constitutes the author’s imagination on the subject of a particular scene.

As he admits, experimental photography is pure passion, the idea of not only creation, but also for life. The uniqueness of moments leads to a subjective presentation of reality, emotions, details. He is not afraid of his own opinion, he is looking for the truth.

The creative process does not start with pressing the shutter button. This is just one part of the whole work. In artistic photography, creation starts with an idea, and the author never stars work without special vision of the photo. Time spent in front of computer monitor is the most important moment in the formation of the world on a particular picture, but the same focus is needed on every creative step.

The artist as his main artistic point consider his dreams visions, however, the creative photography allows him to wider artistic activities. He likes playing with expanse, different situations, or even yourself – his self-portraits. Everything is done without preconceived rules, which gives enormous possibilities. The main thing in his job is to arouse feelings and emotions in the audience, even if this would be a complete denial of all effects. This is just artistic photography – so many hours to create, thenthe final element of surprise, sometimes even for the author.

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James Akena

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I spend a lot of my time covering political news here in Uganda and the Great Lake region, and I photograph feature stories too. I cover topics in different countries in this part of Africa, and have been monitoring and reporting on political developments in the restless Democratic Republic of Congo for a long time

David LaChapelle

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David LaChapelle is known internationally for his exceptional talent in combining a unique hyper-realistic aesthetic with profound social messages.

LaChapelle’s photography career began in the 1980’s when he began showing his artwork in New York City galleries. His work caught the eye of Andy Warhol, who offered him his first job as a photographer at Interview Magazine. His photographs of celebrities in Interview garnered positive attention, and before long he was shooting for a variety of top editorial publications and creating some of the most memorable advertising campaigns of his generation.

LaChapelle’s striking images have graced the covers and pages of Italian Vogue, French Vogue, Vanity Fair, GQ, Rolling Stone and i-D, and he has photographed some of the most recognizable faces on the planet, including Tupac Shakur, Madonna, Eminem, Andy Warhol, Philip Johnson, Lance Armstrong, Pamela Anderson, Lil’ Kim, Uma Thurman, Elizabeth Taylor, David Beckham, Jeff Koons, Leonardo DiCaprio, Hillary Clinton, Muhammad Ali, Britney Spears, Amanda Lepore, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Whitney Houston, Jay Z, Nicki Minaj, Kanye West, and Angelina Jolie, to name a few. After establishing himself as a fixture in contemporary photography, LaChapelle decided to branch out and direct music videos, live theatrical events, and documentary films. His directing credits include music videos for artists such as Christina Aguilera, Moby, Jennifer Lopez, Amy Winehouse, Britney Spears, and No Doubt. His stage work includes Elton John’s The Red Piano and the Caesar’s Palace spectacular he designed and directed in 2004. His burgeoning interest in film led him to make the short documentary Krumped, an award-winner at Sundance from which he developed RIZE, the feature film acquired for worldwide distribution by Lion’s Gate Films. The film was released theatrically in the US and in 17 different countries in the summer of 2005 to huge critical acclaim, and was chosen to open the 2005 Tribeca Film Festival in New York City.

In 2006, LaChapelle decided to minimize his participation in commercial photography, and return to his roots by focusing on fine art photography. Since then, he has been the subject of exhibitions in both commercial galleries and leading public institutions around the world. He has had record breaking solo museum exhibitions at the Barbican Museum, London, Palazzo Reale, Milan, Museo del Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso, Mexico City, the Musee de La Monnaie, Paris, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Taipei, Taiwan. In 2011, he had a major exhibition of new work at The Lever House, New York and retrospectives at the Museo Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico, the Hangaram Design Museum in Seoul, Galerie Rudolfinum in Prague, Fotografiska Museet in Stolkholm, and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art in Israel, in which he was awarded artist of the year. In 2014, LaChapelle exhibited his new series, “Land Scape” in New York, Vienna, London and Paris.

Other selected museum exhibitions include: the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C., the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the National Museum in Krakow, the Kestner-Gesellschaft in Hanover, Germany, the Lucca Center of Contemporary Art Museum in Italy, the Shanghai Duolun Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto, and the Kunsthaus Wien in Vienna.

Over the course of his 30+ year career, LaChapelle continues to be inspired by everything from art history to street culture, from the metaphysical to immortality, projecting an image of twenty-first century pop culture through his work that is both loving and critical. Always aware of larger social implications, LaChapelle’s work transcends the material world. He is quite simply the only photographic artist working today who has been able to successfully maintain a profound impact in the realm of celebrity photography as well as the notoriously discerning contemporary art intelligentsia.

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State Of Things, Nicolas Janowski

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Nicolas Janowski (b. 1980) is an argentine photographer based in Buenos Aires.

BA degree in Anthropology from the UAB (Barcelona, Spain) Photography studies at Centre Iris (Paris, France) and at ARGRA (Argentina).

In 2011 he received a National Grant from INCAA for develop a project about Archaeological Sites in Argentina.

His work has been featured in NY Times Lens Blog, De Spiegel, Burn Magazine, Emaho Magazine , Lugares and Rolling Stone among others.

Along the way he has received several awards, such as first prize in Repsol Lima Photo 2014, Finalist in Burn for Emerging Photographers 2012 and Top Finalist in Fotovisura 2013 edition.

He has exhibited collectively in PhotoEspaña-Brasil 2013, Sao Paulo; Colorful Ghizou 6th China International Photo Festival; PhotoEspaña 2013, Madrid, Fotografia Latinoamericana Contemporanea; Miami PHM Art Basel(2012); Lima, Peru (2012) Miscellaneous Cultural Center and Los Alamos Gallery (Barcelona, 2006-2007) and PhotoPro’s Gallery (El Paso, Texas, USA, 2009) Individually in Vendrazanne Gallerie d’art (Paris, France, 2008); Metales Pesados (Santiago, Chile 2103); Casa Florida Fotografia Contemporanea (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2013)

His photographs have been exhibited in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Venezuela, France Spain, USA, India & China.

Based in Buenos Aires, he currently works as a freelance photographer. At the same time he works on photographic projects independently.

He is also a curator at http://www.phmuseum.com, an online photography museum.

Entidades, Alejandro Sayegh

Entidades. Proyecto Fotográfico. 2013-2014

Alejandro Sayegh incursionó en el mundo de la fotografía viéndola como una herramienta para la investigación científica oceanográfica. Iniciado en la fotografía submarina, científica y documental, obtuvo su única formación formal en fotografía en el Curso de Fotografía Profesional a distancia del New York Institute of Photography. Desde 2009 es fotógrafo freelance especializado en danza, comida gourmet y fotografía científica. Además, ha formado parte del Proyecto Cultural “El Puente”, destinado a estrechar lazos entre artistas de Italia, Japón y Venezuela.

Según Sayegh, esta serie titulada Entidades es un ejercicio de exorcismo. Luego de capturar los paisajes con su lente, transforma lo que registra hasta descubrir formas que forman entes que para él son “esas fuerzas que te empujan a tomar decisiones a lo largo de la vida”. Formas que podrían ser “lo que denominamos ‘conciencia’” y está dada por los valores familiares, la educación y las emociones de quien se presente ante la pieza fotográfica”. Entidades sirvió para darle “un rostro a mis demonios personales, para poder enfrentarlos”, e invita al espectador a ver en ellas a los suyos, que en el fondo no es otra cosa “que verse a sí mismo”. Además de haber participado en varias exposiciones regionales, esta serie ingresó al II Salón Nacional de Fotografía en el MéridaFoto 2014.

Pierre Fudarylí

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“Trying to understand art is simply trying to feed the ego so you can have a topic of conversation in a coffee house table in front of another pseudo-intellectual or someone you want to acknowledge that you know a lot about art.”

The daily geometry of our death, from birth until we cease to die. compose what I call “altered reality of human energy” which graphically describe the behaviors in different states, different vectors fired in all directions in a fractal way, both introspection and projection.

My art does not represent things in a two-dimensional way, but hepta-dimensional way, it analyzes all the spatial axes (north, south, east, west, up, down and the point where you are) and freezes a moment of our human supra-reality.

Helen Sobiralski

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Almagul Menlibayeva

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My educational background is in the Soviet Russian avant-garde school of Futurism, which I combine with a nomadic aesthetic of post-Soviet, contemporary Kazakhstan – something that I have been exploring in recent years through my photographic and video work.
I use specific ways of expression in modern and contemporary art as a vehicle to investigate my personal archaic atavism as a certain mystical anthropomorphism.
In other words, I explore the nature of a specific Egregore, a shared cultural psychic experience, which manifests itself as a specific thought-form among the people(s) of the ancient, arid and dusty Steppes between the Caspian Sea, Baikonur and Altai in today’s Kazakhstan. In the Russian language, Archaic Atavism is personalized as a being, which points to and creates a different meaning. We are not just speaking about an idea or archaic element in the collective subconscious of a people, but about the embodiment of our archaic atavism which becomes an active entity, just like a creature itself. Our archaic atavism is not just internalized, but also externalized. It is as if he has been awakened by the post-Soviet experience of the indigenous Kazakh people, who are becoming their own after 80 years of Soviet domination and cultural genocide.
Suddenly he (Archaic Atavism) became interested in enculturation and in behavioral modernity. He also began to have entertaining dialogues with the transnational circulation of ideas in contemporary art. For this dialogue, I have chosen the medium of video and photography and like to work with the notion of memory and reality. My archaic atavism is interested in my video explorations in the Steppes and in post- Soviet Asia. By editing raw data and combining documentary and staged footage, I become his voice, enabling a cultural exodus from long oblivion. My work raises metaphysical questions such as Who am I? and Where shall I go?; this (psychic) experience and perspective marks my artistic language.

Tamás Ambrits

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Mifos, Eros & Tanatos, ANDREY VANDERUS

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