Jacob Riis

A pioneer in the use of photography as an agent of social reform, Jacob Riis immigrated to the United States in 1870. While working as a police reporter for the New York Tribune, he did a series of exposés on slum conditions on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, which led him to view photography as a way of communicating the need for slum reform to the public. He made photographs of these areas and published articles and gave lectures that had significant results, including the establishment of the Tenement House Commission in 1884. In 1888, Riis left the Tribune to work for the Evening Sun, where he began making the photographs that would be reproduced as engravings and halftones in How the Other Half Lives, his celebrated work documenting the living conditions of the poor, which was published to widespread acclaim in 1890. During the last twenty-five years of his life, Riis produced other books on similar topics, along with many writings and lantern slide lectures on themes relating to the improvement of social conditions for the lower classes. Despite their success during his lifetime, however, his photographs were largely forgotten after his death; ultimately his negatives were found and brought to the attention of the Museum of the City of New York, where a retrospective exhibition of his work was held in 1947.

Riis was among the first in the United States to conceive of photographic images as instruments for social change; he was also among the first to use flash powder to photograph interior views, and his book How the Other Half Lives was one of the earliest to employ halftone reproduction successfully. At a time when the poor were usually portrayed in sentimental genre scenes, Riis often shocked his audience by revealing the horrifying details of real life in poverty-stricken environments. His sympathetic portrayal of his subjects emphasized their humanity and bravery amid deplorable conditions, and encouraged a more sensitive attitude towards the poor in this country.

Lisa Hostetler

Eugeni Forcano

Eugeni Forcano entered the world of photography like a whirlwind, answering Josep Vergés and Néstor Luján’s invitation to joint the magazine Destino in 1960. Self-taught and intuitive, he gazed with wisdom, passion and irony at all around him. In 1964, Joan Perucho highlighted the human depths of Forcano’s work, whilst in 1966, Josep Pla, always sparing in this praise, said of him: “He is a great photographer, a great artist. He is different and unpredictable. Singular”. According to José Corredor–Matheos Forcano “makes us to see that reality is always surprising”. Forcano has the gift of anticipation. Andrés Trapiello insists that “the most important thing in his photographs is the beating of all that is still alive”, whilst Josep Maria Espinàs considers that “you can hear his characters speak”.

Photography marked Forcano’s life forever. An evolutionist and a dreamer, his career embraced different stages: fashion, illustration, symbolism… as well as painstaking research into colour as a new form of artistic expression. Jorge Rueda, writing about Forcano’s colour photography, congratulated him: “At last you have managed to photograph sighs”. Javier Pérez Andújar defines him as follows: “He is, more than an avant-garde photographer, a vitalist photographer who understands the language of his time”.

The facts would appear to confirm this. According to Josep Maria Huertas Claveria, Forcano is “one of the greatest photographers Catalonia has ever produced”.

Humans, Haris Nukem

It’s undeniable that Haris Nukem‘s photos are their own brand of cool. These aren’t typical glamour shots of cookie-cutter models in pristine settings. Models are sometimes photographed in rooms among strewn clothing, casually posing in bathtubs, doing headstands in hallways, or interacting with other fashionably attractive counterparts. The aforementioned models Haris captures are interesting and beautifully flawed creatures who emit vibes of effortless badassery. Freckles, tattoos, iconic beards, body modifications, and piercing eyes are captured in exquisitely high contrast. But, it’s not only the ‘rad’ individuals that make these photos so stylistically memorable and captivating; it’s a combination of the lighting that’s employed and masterful retouching that make for a cinematic look. Haris definitely portrays a darker, grittier side to fashion photography and has a refreshing take on portraiture.

Below you’ll find Haris’ straightforward, reflective, mildly humorous (i.e. “Tiger-Style”) responses to Beautiful.bizarre’s interview questions. To see more of his work beyond here, follow him on various forms of social media where you’ll stay up to date with his upcoming projects (#breatheproject and #capsulecouples), calls for London-based models, and see more of his radiant photography along with comical quips.

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Raymond Depardon

 

 

 

 

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Raymond Depardon, born in France in 1942, began taking photographs on his family farm in Garet at the age of 12. Apprenticed to a photographer-optician in Villefranche-sur-Saône, he left for Paris in 1958.

He joined the Dalmas agency in Paris in 1960 as a reporter, and in 1966 he co-founded the Gamma agency, reporting from all over the world. From 1974 to 1977, as a photographer and film-maker, he covered the kidnap of a French ethnologist, François Claustre, in northern Chad. Alongside his photographic career, he began to make documentary films: 1974, Une Partie de Campagne and San Clemente.

In 1978 Depardon joined Magnum and continued his reportage work until the publication of Notes in 1979 and Correspondance New Yorkaise in 1981. In that same year, Reporters came out and stayed on the programme of a cinema in the Latin Quarter for seven months. In 1984 he took part in the DATAR project on the French countryside.

While still pursuing his film-making career, he received the Grand Prix National de la Photographie in 1991, but his films also won recognition: in 1995 his film Délits Flagrants, on the French justice system, received a César Award for best documentary, and in 1998 he undertook the first in a series of three films devoted to the French rural world. The Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris mounted an important exhibition of his work in 2000. The sequel to his work on French justice was shown as part of the official selection at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004.

As part of an initiative by the Fondation Cartier for contemporary art, Depardon made an installation of films on twelve large cities, shown in Paris, Tokyo and Berlin between 2004 and 2007. In 2006 he was invited to be artistic director of the Rencontres Internationales d’Arles. He is working on a photographic project on French territory which is due to be completed in 2010. He has made eighteen feature-length films and published forty-seven books.

Melodie McDaniel

Melodie McDaniel is a still life, celebrity, advertising photographer and film director.

Melodie’s first professional job was album artwork for Suzanne Vega, which received critical praise and led to further work with such musical artists as Smashing Pumpkins, Mazzy Star, Cat Power, Pharrell Williams, and Lily Allen. She went on to direct music videos, including clips for Annie Lennox, Blonde Redhead, Patti Smith, and Madonna. Melodie signed with The Directors Bureau in 2002. Melodie has since worked on spots for Chevy, Toyota, Vodafone, Zune, and Nike.

Melodie McDaniel continues to maintain a dual career in commercials/music videos and still photography.

Melodie McDaniel has shot editorially for Nylon Magazine, Giant Magazine, Elle, Vogue, Spin Magazine, Dazed & Confused, Interview, 10 Magazine, Jane Magazine, Details and Lula Magazine.

She has photographed celebrities including as Lily Allen, Ludacris, Pharrell Williams, Rihanna, Ryan Gosling, Carrie Underwood, Rob Machado, Robin Tunney.

She also the music video: “Carnival” with Natalie Merchant

Raquel Chicheri

Me guío bastante por el instinto, supongo que tengo una noción bastante clara del resultado a la hora de disparar, aunque no es nada programado, soy incapaz de organizar y planear con un mínimo de detalle una sesión de fotos.

Veo si me gusta lo que tengo delante, supongo que en ese momento mi cabeza empieza a trabajar con esquemas mentales de composición, y por supuesto también está presente el componente emocional de la imagen, uno de los motivos por lo que yo encuentro tan atractivas algunas imágenes que a otras personas pueden no sugerirle nada.

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Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks was an American photographer, musician, writer and film director. He is best remembered for his photographic essays for Life magazine and as the director of the 1971 film, Shaft.

Gordon Parks was one of the seminal figures of twentieth century photography. A humanitarian with a deep commitment to social justice, he left behind a body of work that documents many of the most important aspects of American culture from the early 1940s up until his death in 2006, with a focus on race relations, poverty, Civil Rights, and urban life. In addition, Parks was also a celebrated composer, author, and filmmaker who interacted with many of the most prominent people of his era—from politicians and artists to celebrities and athletes.

Born into poverty and segregation in Kansas in 1912, Parks was drawn to photography as a young man when he saw images of migrant workers published in a magazine. After buying a camera at a pawnshop, he taught himself how to use it and despite his lack of professional training, he found employment with the Farm Security Administration (F.S.A.), which was then chronicling the nation’s social conditions. Parks quickly developed a style that would make him one of the most celebrated photographers of his age, allowing him to break the color line in professional photography while creating remarkably expressive images that consistently explored the social and economic impact of racism.

When the F.S.A. closed in 1943, Parks became a freelance photographer, balancing work for fashion magazines with his passion for documenting humanitarian issues. His 1948 photo essay on the life of a Harlem gang leader won him widespread acclaim and a position as the first African American staff photographer and writer for Life Magazine, then by far the most prominent photojournalist publication in the world. Parks would remain at Life Magazine for two decades, chronicling subjects related to racism and poverty, as well as taking memorable pictures of celebrities and politicians (including Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and Stokely Carmichael). His most famous images, such as Emerging Man, 1952, and American Gothic, 1942, capture the essence of activism and humanitarianism in mid-twentieth century America and have become iconic images, defining their era for later generations. They also rallied support for the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement, for which Parks himself was a tireless advocate as well as a documentarian.

Parks spent much of the last three decades of his life expanding his style, conducting experiments with color photography. He continued working up until his death in 2006, winning numerous awards, including the National Medal of Arts in 1988, and over fifty honorary doctorates. He was also a noted composer and author, and in 1969, became the first African American to write and direct a Hollywood feature film based on his bestselling novel The Learning Tree. This was followed in 1971 by the hugely successful motion picture Shaft. The core of his accomplishment, however, remains his photography the scope, quality, and enduring national significance of which is reflected throughout the Collection. According to Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Center at Harvard University, “Gordon Parks is the most important black photographer in the history of photojournalism. Long after the events that he photographed have been forgotten, his images will remain with us, testaments to the genius of his art, transcending time, place and subject matter.”

Mustafa Seven

 

Mustafa Seven was born in Sivas, Turkey in 1974. He started his photojournalism career in Sabah Newspaper Magazine Group and continued with Hürriyet Magazine Group, Gazete Pazar and Milliyet before becoming the photography editor of Akşam Newspaper. Afterwards Seven directed his attention and works to street photography which he defines as “witnessing life”.

Mustafa Seven has been awarded at many national and international photography contests; he took part in numerous exhibitions and festivals, holding a personal exhibition called “Tek” in 2013. Seven, who has presented his work through various mediums throughout his career, has been using Intagram as an active channel in the recent years. He sees this medium as a personal portfolio space and he is one of the Turkish photographers who has reached the top number of followers.

Mustafa Seven also makes time for educational activities; he holds workshops on street photography and works on projects together with universities and other educational institutions.

He has two books published by İnkılap Bookstore; the first is “Instagram” which is a collection of Istanbul photographs shared on Instagram, the second is “Street Photography” which he has written as a guide for those beginning to work in this specific field of photography.

Mustafa Seven continues to work as a freelance photojournalist and to produce photographs that communicate the street and document the era he lives in with private national and international projects…

Iana Tokarchuk

I was born in the USSR. Currently I live and work in Kiev, Ukraine. My childhood was marked by immersion in art, as I painted ceaselessly from a very young age. At some point I also began writing short stories and plays. This made me pay particular attention to narration in any visual art I do, as an image always tells a story (or stories) to its spectator.

When I was 14 my father gave me and my sister cameras as a present, and by the age of 18 I firmly decided that this is what I want to associate my life with. For 5 years I have been working in fashion photography with my twin-sister, but now we work mostly separately.

Recently I started experimenting with filmmaking and diversifying into different genres of photography.

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The World the Children Made, Shin Noguchi

In this project, I try to express “children’s world” more realistically and more positively than Ray Bradbury’s short story “The World the Children Made”, by narrowing down the subject to children from main project “Something Here”.

When I looked their world the children of today show from time to time, I have remembered that I learned about an individual and society in there, and that “time” and that “smell” were certainly over there too. I think this time retrace own past, in other words, it may be replaced with “Save” in today’s society.

At that time, I strongly feel that I want to regain their world in the place to be, it has been removed from contemporary society and it has been rebuild in the virtual/cyber space, and it’s an essential element to form the city space that can coexist with natural environments.

Shin Noguchi is an award winning street photographer based in Kamakura and Tokyo, Japan. He describes his street photography as an attempt to capture extraordinary moments of excitement, beauty and humanism, among the flow of everyday life and has a discreet, poetic and enigmatic approach that is sensitive to the subtleties and complexities of Japanese culture without using posed/staged and no-finder/hip shot.

“Street photography always projects the “truth”. The “truth” that I talk about isn’t necessarily that I can see, but they also exist in society, in street, in people’s life. and I always try to capture this reality beyond my own values and viewpoint/perspective.”

He is also featured in MAP Talent, Liberation, The Independent, Leica Camera and many others, and you can find one of his photos on the back cover of Prestel’s new book “100 Great Street Photographs”, and he will also join photography charity for The Hepatitis C Trust in UK in October

Wayne Chinnock

Raised in Tucson Arizona by a mechanical engineering father who loved Mexican food and an amazing bread baking mom, Wayne always had a fondness for the kitchen. His father was also an avid photographer with an in-home darkroom; cameras became instinctual to use by Wayne from childhood into adult life.

Wayne started in the service industry just two days after turning sixteen which became an extended career putting him through college and helping him to travel to 40+ countries. He spent time in the front-of-the-house in restaurants, hotels and catering companies in addition to many hours in the kitchen working the grill and dessert stations. There is almost no position he hasn’t done in the restaurant biz. The service industry has taken him to San Francisco, Dublin, Nantucket, New York and Philadelphia to name a few. He will admit that the energy is infectious.

After all the years of restaurant work coupled with teaching English abroad and acquiring a degree in Psychology (he also spent over 100 hours in the darkroom at the Creative Photography Center at the University of Arizona) Wayne decided to finally settle down with his wife Melodie in the Boston area and put all his energy into photography. He has been creating images full time for more than 10 years. All the while his experience within the service industry and in the kitchen has endeared him to chefs, creative directors, restauranteurs, executives and many more.

Whether he is photographing for a renowned chef, documenting medical relief in Haiti, showcasing the beauty of a new interior space or creating images in the studio, Wayne’s obsession with providing not only a great final product, but a great customer service based experience, is always evident.

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Sonia Chabas

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Harold Feinstein

Harold Feinstein was born in Coney Island in 1931. When he passed away in 2015, the New York Times declared him: “One of the most accomplished recorders of the American experience.”

He began his career in photography in 1946 at the age of 15 and within four short years, Edward Steichen, an early supporter, had purchased his work for the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). He joined the Photo League at 17 and became a prominent figure in the vanguard of the early New York City street photography scene where he exhibited at Helen Gee’s Limelight Gallery and was a designer for historic Blue Note Records. He was one of the original inhabitants of the legendary “Jazz Loft,” which he later turned over to his long-time collaborator and colleague W. Eugene Smith for whom he designed the original lay-out of the famous Pittsburgh Project. Their association prompted this statement from Smith:

He is one of the very few photographers I have known, or have been influenced by, with the ability to reveal the familiar to me in a beautifully new, in a strong and honest way.

Courage, Steve McCurry

I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it.

The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.

Nelson Mandela

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Lida Chaulet

A Dutch photographer having lived in the Netherlands for most of her life, while travelling abroad, from time to time. At age 10, she received her first camera as a first prize, resulting she carried her camera everywhere, becoming professional some years later.

She studied chemistry, math, computer sciences and programming languages. Her career has encompassed: chemical analyst, technical support engineer and as manager of an international computer help-desk. Recently she commenced a senior position for the Publicity & Promotion of a Lighting firm.

In 2004 she was asked for a few photography projects and this made her decide to study photography at the Fotovakschool in Apeldoorn (NL), specializing in Portrait and Fashion.

Horst P. Horst, Ruth Bernard, Jeanloup Sieff, Elliott Erwitt, André Kertész, Herb Ritts, and Robert Doisneau, amongst others, have influenced her professional views.

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Goldo (Dominique Houcmant)

Goldo (aka Dominique Houcmant) and his camera are one and the same. If one sees the first, the second is generally not far distant: around his neck, in his hand, lying on a bar or at the end of a table. Appearances can be misleading however: one never actually sees Goldo, he sees everything first. He has got a natural talent in anticipating fragile images: a reflection of light on an arm, a shadow on a wall, a face behind a glass of beer, a light bird on the dark tarmac.

Goldo is an eye moving stealthily in a fast progressing world. His snapshots stop time. For a smile, a glance or a gesture, color gives way to black and white and the continuous showdown between light and dark. Anyhow, he catches our hectic world: drunken nights, concerts, factories and boats, actors, lonely girls sitting at a table, worn-out hands or smoking cigarettes….

Goldo is picture compulsive. Not only does he take pictures but he publishes them on the web, he comments them, classifies them, adds soundtracks to them, discusses about links and comments, he is weaving an image web on the networks network.

Behind the frenzy and the feeling of emergency, the essence survives: the images coming out from Dominique Houcmant’s camera don’t show the world as it is but as it should be in Goldo’s eye: dark, disconcerting, highly-strung and almost always stirring. A touching and human world made of little moments lasting for eternity. (Nicolas Ancion)

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Yvon Buchmann

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Erin Mulvehill

My work aims to explore the human connections and subtle nuances that whisper into the ear of our every day. much of my work is rooted in the ideas of mind, body, seamlessness, and time. this is largely because my deepest beliefs lie in the principles of buddhism, the integration of art and life, and the preservation of beautiful moments. i am nomadic by nature and am inspired each day by the nothingness that resides in all things.

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Milagros Caturla

 

Milagros Caturla considerada la Vivian Maier barcelonesa, capturó con su cámara el día a día de la sociedad creando un retrato de la ciudad, que permite recrear la historia de Barcelona. Las fotografías de Caturla, al igual que las de la fotógrafa estadounidense, permanecieron ocultas durante años.

Amanda Lucier

Amanda Lucier graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Reed College with a degree in Political Science and is finishing her Master’s degree in Photojournalism at the University of Missouri. Currently a staff photographer at the Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, VA, she interned at The Herald in Jasper, Ind., and the Dallas Morning News in Dallas, Tx. Amanda was twice a Rhodes Scholarship finalist, Runner-Up 2008 College Photographer of the Year, and was recently named Virginia News Photographer of the Year.