Dorothea Lange

Dorothea Lange was an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration. Lange’s photographs humanized the consequences of the Great Depression and influenced the development of documentary photography.

Born of second generation German immigrants on May 26, 1895, at 1041 Bloomfield Street, Hoboken, New Jersey, Dorothea Lange was named Dorothea Margaretta Nutzhorn at birth. She dropped her middle name and assumed her mother’s maiden name after her father abandoned the family when she was 12 years old, one of two traumatic incidents early in her life. The other was her contraction of polio at age seven which left her with a weakened right leg and a permanent limp. “It formed me, guided me, instructed me, helped me and humiliated me,” Lange once said of her altered gait. “I’ve never gotten over it, and I am aware of the force and power of it.

Sergey Lobovikov


Sergey Lobovikov was born in the family of a village deacon in Vyatka province, and orphaned early, was given into the service and training merchant and photographer Tikhonov P. G. in the provincial city of Vyatka.
Still in his early youth he became known to the artistic community Vyatka due to his creative talent and talent for the arts. Amateur artist, he was in the early 1890s turned to photography, and in 1900 participated as an Exhibitor of the Russian pavilion at the world exhibition in Paris and received a bronze medal of the Exhibition. During this period, the main theme of his works is Vyatskiy rural landscape and Studio portrait.
Since 1908 Lobovikov Chairman of Vyatskie photographic society. The most famous Lobovikova brought genre scenes of peasant life and portraits of peasant children, created in 1907-1911. During this period Sergey prints your photos in the so-called “noble engineering” — gum Arabic and bromoil. After 1911 to experiment in the techniques of noble press added the “noble” direct printing in which the master has reached the large variety of gray tones.

Kenneth Van Sickle

Ken Van Sickle’s photographs summon a tart romanticism. They fulfill the time-traveling brief of all great photography, granting onlookers intimate, keyhole access to Paris in fifties, the New York Beat scene, Andy Warhol’s Factory. You can almost smell the cigarette smoke in that Greenwich village club. You can feel the sunlight on that sleeping cat’s back. And yet time and again you find yourself you have to check the date on the photographs, so contemporary do some of Van Sickle’s more experimental effects seem — his fondness for smoke and blur, for double and pinhole exposures, smudges and superimpositions all lending his work a sense of haloed perception, of fresh apprehension furred with the workings of mind and memory. These photographs are taken with more than just a recording eye. They have the sweet ache of dreams awoken from just this morning.
A native of New Brunswick, New Jersey, Van Sickle learned the basics of drawing, painting and composition from his grandfather and later studied under George Grosz at the Art Students League and cubist painter André Lhote in Paris. Compositionally, he is capable of both a sinewy elegance of line and graphic boldness: a deep vertical slash of sunlight illuminates the dark well of a Grasse alleyway; the steep climb of a biplane above a spit of land offers an airy reprieve from the forces of gravity. There is something of Chagall to his work — a sense of playful dislocation. He may not be the first photographer to bounce skylight off the wet streets of New York, or to seize on the compositional opportunities afforded by the city under snow, but when melting snowflakes smudge his lens, creating little coronas of light that merge with billowing steam from a subway grate, the result is magical, synesthetic: an image of steam and snow, fire and ice, both hot and cold at once. The city seems prowled by dragons.
The warmth is more than just a matter of temperature. As keen an eye as Van Sickle has for the city’s powers of accidental abstraction — a conga-line of umbrellas on a cross-walk, the owners’ faces obscured, a ring of balloons encircling their sellers heads — he has too much curiosity about human motive to use his subjects merely for decoration. Those umbrella-bearers have their heads down for a reason. His en passant portraitsevince a deep, unfakeable relish for idiosyncracy and human kink: a woman’s arm, draped across her partner’s forest of belly hair, suggests a Coney island reworking of Cocteau’sBeauty and the Beast; a biker incongruously tans himself using sun reflectors like a New Jersey housewife; a street trader, his face obscured by cigarette smoke but for his furry, steepled eyebrows, nonetheless communicates with them as amply as Chaplin; a young boy on the streets of Paris, surrounded by his gang, smokes with such comical pugnacity he seems to be defying you to do something about it.
It’s hard not to feel in Van Sickle’s Parisian photographs the unavoidable influence of Cartier Bresson, with whom he shared a teacher in Lhote, and a lifelong love of the Leica camera. Van Sickle’s bought his while on active duty in Korea, together with a 35 mm lens, that went with him everywhere. His lack of funds, and film roll, inculcated the Bressonian virtue of catching moments on the fly, sometimes on a first take, but while he shares the French master’s sense of ripeness — his eye for thismoment, plucked from a hundred others — there is to Van Sickle a provocative sense of mystery that tilts him towards more modern, cinematic sensibilities. In ‘Car Stop’ a woman photographed through the windscreen of a car, stands with her back to the camera, clutching a bunch of thistles. Did she stop to pick them? And what of those two motorbikes that appear to have caught her eye, speeding toward her? Threat licks at the edges of the idyll. In ‘White Poodle,’ a wary poodle peers from out the back door of a Volkswagon at the blurry street-scene going on in the foreground. Should he leave the car, or keep his nose out of trouble and move along?
Captivated by the movie industry as a boy, Van Sickle worked for 25 years as a director of photography on various documentaries, commercials and features, including Queen, a documentary about a transvestite beauty pageant held in New York in 1967, and Marjoe, a 1972 documentary about the boy-wonder faith-healer turned b-movie actor Gortner Marjoe, which won the Oscar for best documentary that year. Van Sickle’s eye for human oddity, and slightly smudged glamor, seen askance, lingers in his photographs of celebrities — Shelley Duvall examining her hair on the set of Bernice Bobs Her Hair; Allen Ginsberg reading Howl to a circle of cross-legged listeners in a Village nightclub; Andy Warhol sitting next to an art buyer on a sofa, the buyer smoking a cigarette with almost post-coital tristesse. Have they done the deed or is it yet to come? Not for nothing is one of Van Sickle’s photographs entitled “Subsequently”: his work is pregnant with a sense of urgency and sequence, his photographs not just a record of this moment, thinly sliced, but the ghost of the world that preceded it, and the shadow of the world yet to come.

Brent Stirton

Brent Stirton is a senior staff photographer for Reportage by Getty Images, New York. He specializes in documentary work and is known for his alternative approaches. He travels an average of ten months of the year on assignment.

Stirton works on a regular basis for the Global Business Coalition on HIV/Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria. He has been a longtime photographer for the World Wildlife Fund for Nature, shooting global campaigns on sustainability. He also works for the Ford and Clinton Foundations, the Nike Foundation, and the World Economic Forum.

He has received awards from the Overseas Press Club, the Frontline Club, the Deadline Club, Days Japan, POY, China International Photo Awards, the Lead Awards, Graphis, American Photography, American Photo, and the American Society of Publication Designers. He has received five awards from the World Press Photo Foundation and has also received awards from the United Nations for his work on the environment and in the field of HIV.

“As journalists we often have to find new ways to tell an old story,” he says. “I believe in trying to tell that story in the most powerful way I can under the limited circumstance that time brings to any assignment. I am trying to be less concerned with who I am working for and more concerned about what I am doing with my time. This is [a] crucial period in our history on this planet and I want to feel like I am working on issues that matter beyond the sensationalism of the 24-hour news cycle.”

Stirton’s photos have appeared in National Geographic magazine, Newsweek, the New York Times Magazine, L’Express, Le Monde 2, GQ, GEO, and many other respected international titles.

 

Martin Munkácsi

 

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In his day, the Hungarian Martin Munkacsi (1896–1963) was one of the most famous photographers in the world. His dynamic photographs of sports, entertainers, politics, and street life in Germany and Hungary from the late 1920s and 1930s, were taken in a new, freewheeling style that captured the speed and movement of the modern era. Many of those early photographs were published in German photo weeklies, where Munkacsi made his reputation doing reportage, often from exotic locales. In 1933, Munkacsi turned his energetic style to fashion photography, making images of models running on the beach. Those pictures revolutionized fashion photography with their informality and vitality. Soon after he was offered a contract by Carmel Snow, the editor of Harper’s Bazaar, and he left for New York, where he made his fame and fortune. This exhibition, organized by F.C. Gundlach at the Haus der Photographie, Hamburg, includes over 125 vintage photographs as well as magazines and page layouts.

Alice Austen

Alice Austen (March 17, 1866 – June 9, 1952) was one of America’s earliest and most prolific female photographers. Alice became interested in photography when her uncle, Oswald Müller, brought home a camera around 1876. Alice’s uncle Peter Townsend Austen was a chemistry professor at Rutgers who taught her photographic processing. Peter and Oswald converted a closet on the second floor into Alice’s darkroom. The earliest extant photograph by her is dated 1884. Over the next 40 years she produced around 8,000 photographs.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont


Jules Gervais-Courtellemont (1863–1931) was a French photographer who was famous for taking color autochromes during World War I. He was born in the province of Seine-et-Marne, near Paris, but grew up in Algeria, where he developed a passion for the pre-colonial Orient and devoted most of his professional career in search of the exotic. In 1894 he converted to Islam prior to making a pilgrimage to Mecca. Images collected in Turkey, Palestine, Egypt, Tunisia, Spain, India, Morocco and China formed the basis for his popular illustrated lectures, which he illustrated with lantern slides. With the outbreak of World War I, Courtellemont returned to his home province to record the war. After the war, Courtellemont began working for an American publication. He eventually became a photographer for National Geographic. In 1911, Courtellemont opened the “Palais de l’autochromie” in Paris, which comprised an exhibition hall, studio, laboratory, and lecture hall with a seating capacity of 250. It was in this hall that Courtellemont would project his autochromes both of the Orient and, after 1914, of the war, particularly the Marne battlefields. These lectures proved to be so popular that Courtellemont issued a twelve-part series later bound in book form called The Battle of Marne and later a four-part series entitled The Battle of Verdun. These are the first books ever published in color on war.[1] Between 1923 and 1925 he wrote a three-volume work entitled La Civilisation – Histoire sociale de l’humanité, illustrated with his photographs. He was a lifelong friend of the novelist, Orientalist and photographer Pierre Loti. While over 5,500 Gervais-Courtellemont autochromes survive in various institutional collections, his work in private hands is quite rare and sought after. Courtellemon died in 1931. His German counterpart is Hans Hildenbrand.

Lala Deen Dayal


Lala Deen Dayal (1844–1905) was an Indian photographer. An engineer by education, Dayal was drawn to photography as early as 1875. Those were early days of photography, and Deen Dayal used primitive equipment and chemicals. His first patron was Maharaja Tukoji Rao II of Indore, who introduced him to Sir Henry Daly, the British Agent at Indore, which eventually led to his appointment as “Photographer to His Excellency, the Viceroy”. Deen Dayal’s albums of India views and ancient monuments became very popular and were bought as memorabilia and gifts by the British and Indian Royalty. Lala Deen Dayal, often referred to as “Raja Deen Dayal” after a title bestowed on him by the Nizam of Hyderabad, died in 1905. His intimate glimpses into the lives of princes, and the British, ordinary fold and tribals, as well as vistas of archaeological sites, monuments and the architectural heritage of the country are collectors items toda

Eva Besnyö

 

 

 

 

Photographer and photojournalist Eva Besnyö was born in Budapest on April 29, 1910. Her father, Bernat Besnyö, a lawyer, was born in 1877 and killed in Auschwitz in 1944. Her mother Ilonka, née Kelemen, was born in 1883 and died in 1981. Raised in a liberal Jewish home, Eva grew up knowing both German and Hungarian. Her father’s wish that she continue studying after completing high school was not to her liking; she wanted to become a photographer. Thus in 1928 she began a two-year course of studies at the renowned József Pécsi Portrait, Advertising and Architecture Studio, where she also did her apprenticeship. In 1930 she decided to move to Berlin, metropolis of the avant-garde, not only in order to get away from home but also in order to leave the Hungary of the Horthy regime. Later she referred to her stay in Berlin as the most important period of her life, meaning that it laid the foundations not only of her photographic practice but also of her political awareness. She worked for a short time in the laboratory of the advertising photographer René Ahrlé until she found more interesting employment with the press photographer Dr. Peter Weller, for whom she did photoreportage on everyday themes. As was customary at the time, these appeared under his name in the Berliner Illustrirten Zeitung. When she was permitted to choose her own topics, she simply went out on the streets, where she always found what interested her. She became part of a circle of socially and politically engaged intellectuals and artists such as György Kepes, Joris Ivens, John Fernhout, Lászlo Moholy-Nagy, Otto Umbehr (Umbo), Robert Capa and others, attended the Marxist Workers’ Evening Courses, went to productions by Erwin Piscator and was fascinated by Russian film. In 1931 she seized an opportunity to become independent by establishing her own studio. Commissions and work for the Neofot Picture Agency brought her success, which was however soon interrupted: early on she became aware of the growing threat of National-Socialism and in the autumn of 1932 she decided to move to Amsterdam with her Dutch companion, the cameraman John Fernhout, with whom she lived until 1939. With the help of the artist Charley Toorop, she soon found her feet in Holland and the recognition she won by her exhibitions led to numerous commissions in the fields of photoreportage, portraits, fashion and architecture. In 1934 she became a member of the association of artists for the defense of cultural rights. In this capacity she participated in the association’s 1936 protest exhibition against the Berlin Olympic Games, the “Olympics under Dictatorship” and organized the internationally-oriented exhibition “Foto ’37” at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, intended to enhance awareness of photography as an art form.

After the capitulation of the Netherlands army in May 1940, as the conditions of Jews steadily deteriorated, Eva Besnyö was forbidden to engage in all journalistic activities. In 1942, when her sole source of income was a few private commissions, she went underground for two years. After the war she received numerous commissions for photo-documentation and remained professionally active, though she was now the mother of a son (born in 1945) and a daughter (born in 1948), fathered by the graphic designer Wim Brusse, from whom she separated in 1968. From 1970 to 1976 Eva Besnyö was active in the Dolle-Mina feminist movement for women’s rights and through her photographs became the chronicler of events. In 1980 she rejected the Ritterorden (knighthood) which was to have been bestowed on her by the Queen of the Netherlands. In 1999, in Berlin, the “grand old lady” of Dutch photography was awarded the Dr. Erich Salomon Award for her life’s work and at the end of the same year the Stedelijk Museum held an exhibition of her work.

Eva Besnyö died in Laren, Netherlands on December 12, 2002.

Alberto García-Alix

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Alberto García-Alix, nacido en 1957, es un fotógrafo español de León, España. Ganador del Premio Nacional de Fotografía en 1999, su trabajo ha llegado a diferentes países y ha sido elogiado por publicaciones como Vogue, British Journal of Photography o Vanity Fair. Amante de las motocicletas y los retratos, sus cámaras Leica y Hasselblad han inmortalizado importantes artistas nacionales e internacionales. Siempre se ha inspirado en las bicicletas, los tatuajes, la música y la noche. Él define sus retratos como una confrontación con su propio modelo. García-Alix es una de las figuras más destacadas del movimiento conocido como La Movida Madrileña, dejando imágenes bien conocidas y poderosas de la juventud de este movimiento cultural. Entre sus miembros están algunos de sus amigos, que posteriormente se han convertido en personalidades de renombre en diferentes campos, Pedro Almodóvar, Rossy de Palma, Emma Suárez, Camarón de la Isla y muchos otros. A menudo violentamente desvergonzado, sus obras son recurrentemente retratos crudos y desnudos. A menudo se consideran reacciones exageradas, pero su poder expresivo y eficacia gráfica es innegable. García-Alix ha dedicado toda su carrera a la fotografía en blanco y negro como documentación personal y social. Desde sus largas estancias en Francia y China en 2007 y 2008, ha estado experimentando con video documentando sus imágenes acompañadas de sus propios textos y voz.

Don Hudson

I was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1950 and have lived in the area my entire life. In 1972 I decided to act on my love of photography and enrolled in art school. During my two years there I studied the language, both the history and the history-in-making, honed my technical skills, and most importantly, began an association with like-minded souls playing the game of photography. For 40 years, through peaks and valleys of activity, my playing of the game has been about my personal relationship with how the camera describes the appearance of truth in a photograph. You will have to look at the photographs for further explanation. I consider myself a thoughtful, and proudly amateur photographer. A book of my photographs from the last century, From The Archives, has recently been published in France.

Don Hudson

Chris Simpson

CHRIS SIMPSON Born in 1952 in Zurich, raised in Africa and Mauritius. His unique way of seeing was influenced by the exoticism of the natural world around him. Simpson’s photographs, with their clean lines and uncluttered compositions, exemplify his innate understanding of the simplicity of natural beauty and form.

Educated in the UK and trained at art school in London in the early 1970s, his internship at Vogue Studios with David Bailey, Clive Arrowsmith and Olivero Toscani convinced him that his initial path was fashion.

He spent the next 20 years as a fashion photographer, living in both Paris and London. In the late 1980s, he was shooting high-profile advertising campaigns for British Airways, Mercedes-Benz, Bacardi Rum, Stella Artois and the Australian Tourist Board, taking time off between commissions to shoot pictures for himself.

1987 marked a turning point in his career when he travelled to the Northern Territory in Australia to photograph the Aboriginal people. The pictures he brought back, portraying the timeless, dreamlike quality of the land and the warmth and dignity of the people, were exhibited to great acclaim. That success ultimately led him to devote more of his time to taking his own pictures.

His globetrotting has taken him from remote regions such as the Atacama Desert and Easter Island, to the Himba tribe of Namibia and tobacco farmers in Cuba. His trip to Madagascar in 1997 resulted in many inspirational pictures, one of them being his signature picture Allée des Baobabs. At every location, he brilliantly captures the very essence and character of the landscape, the people and the atmosphere.

Richard Tuschman

RICHARD TUSCHMAN began experimenting with digital imaging in the early 1990’s, developing a style that synthesized his interests in photography, painting and assemblage. He has been exhibited widely, both in the US and internationally. Accolades and awards include Prix de la Photographie Paris (Gold Medal, People’s Choice), Critical Mass Top 50, International Kontinent Awards (1st Place, Fine Art Projects) and Center Project Launch Juror’s Award (chosen by Roger Watson, Fox Talbot Museum) among others. His photographs have been published on numerous online magazines/journals including Slate, LensCulture, LensScratch and Huffington Post. In 2016 he was named a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in Photography. He currently lives and works in New York and Europe.

Vitas Luckus

Vitas Luckus was born on May 29, 1943 in Kaunas, Lithuania. At the age of eighteen, after graduating with a degree in drawing and painting, his parents gave him an AGFA camera, which initiated his fascination in photography. In the following years he developed a great interest in art photography and became a member of the Kaunas Photo Club, to which he was elected president a few years later.
According to Luckus, the conventional use of light and visual arrangement of a photograph would leave out essential elements that could retrieve the vitality and different levels of reality. He advocated a style in which there was no hierarchy of meaning: every element in the photographic composition was of equal importance. Only then was it possible to capture the “truth” and represent the essence of a scene, of life itself.
For his series, and last work, Attitude towards Old Photography, Luckus made montages from a large collection of photographic images other than his own. In the book he created of these works, text and titles were deliberately excluded to maintain the unity of his constructed realism. In his diary he wrote:
In the beginning I tried to classify my work according to social phenomena and photographical style, emphasizing the topic of life and death. This made me feel like a Lithuanian artist carving statues of God or the saints. When I put everything on the table, however, I felt like a god myself. In front of me I had an Asian and a Red Indian, a Negro, a white, a Moslem, a Buddhist, a Christian, the Czarist army, the Polish army, the Kaiser, the war, funerals and weddings. I shuffled thousands of images into a heap an found they were an orderly heap of life, because everything here was life and because all of us, whether a boxer, a Czar, a beggar or a half-naked woman were disclosed here. Archive photography seemed to me to reflect a bottomless well, waiting for someone to look into it and understand it.
Luckus was known to drink excessively and experienced ongoing confrontation with the authorities. This battle was set off by his refusal to adhere to the conventional standards of beauty, regulations that were firmly guarded by the Lithuanian government. In 1987, during a visit from several men to his home, Luckus got into an argument with one of the men, who was later identified as a KGB agent. The fight became violent and Luckus stabbed and killed the man. Only moments after the incident, Tanya Luckiene, his wife, found Luckus: he had jumped to his death from their balcony.
Together with Aleksandras Macijauskas, Vitas Luckus is considered to be a reformer of the traditional romantic realism within Lithuanian photography.

Chris Simpson


CHRIS SIMPSON Born in 1952 in Zurich, raised in Africa and Mauritius. His unique way of seeing was influenced by the exoticism of the natural world around him. Simpson’s photographs, with their clean lines and uncluttered compositions, exemplify his innate understanding of the simplicity of natural beauty and form.


Educated in the UK and trained at art school in London in the early 1970s, his internship at Vogue Studios with David Bailey, Clive Arrowsmith and Olivero Toscani convinced him that his initial path was fashion.


He spent the next 20 years as a fashion photographer, living in both Paris and London. In the late 1980s, he was shooting high-profile advertising campaigns for British Airways, Mercedes-Benz, Bacardi Rum, Stella Artois and the Australian Tourist Board, taking time off between commissions to shoot pictures for himself.


1987 marked a turning point in his career when he travelled to the Northern Territory in Australia to photograph the Aboriginal people. The pictures he brought back, portraying the timeless, dreamlike quality of the land and the warmth and dignity of the people, were exhibited to great acclaim. That success ultimately led him to devote more of his time to taking his own pictures.


His globetrotting has taken him from remote regions such as the Atacama Desert and Easter Island, to the Himba tribe of Namibia and tobacco farmers in Cuba. His trip to Madagascar in 1997 resulted in many inspirational pictures, one of them being his signature picture Allée des Baobabs. At every location, he brilliantly captures the very essence and character of the landscape, the people and the atmosphere.

Alex Saberi


Alex Saberi is a National Geographic photographer from London. He began photography as a hobby by mainly taking photos of Richmond Park and has had a photo book of the park published in 2012. .
The park was the perfect place to practice his photography skills which he went onto use on his photo trips around the world. Most recently he has been spending his time photographing the beaches, jungles and wildlife of Ubatuba in Brazil.
He has appeared in many digital camera magazines and publications. As well as this Alex has won several photography competitions, from winning the Environmental Protection Agency’s wildlife competition, to winning on several worldwide online competition websites. He came second in Landscape photographer of the year with his photo “One man and his Dog”, and appeared several times in both the British wildlife photographer of the year books and landscape photographer of the year books.
The vast majority of these photos are available for commercial use through my agent Nat Geo Creative. If not please contact me directly here

Minotaur Island, Mehran Khalili

In 2016, my family and I moved to Crete. The largest of Greece’s islands, it’s an idyllic place—rich in mythology, history, and nature.

Yet since I arrived, I’ve also felt a strange, dark energy here. Not from the people, but from the island itself. As if the nature and environment sometimes present an imminent threat.

This photo series is my attempt to exorcise this feeling; to bring it into the light so I can better understand it and, ultimately, rid myself of it.

Anders Beer Wilse

Anders Beer Wilse (12 June 1865 – 21 February 1949) was a Norwegian photographer whose photography visually documented Norway in the early to mid-20th century.Wilse was born in Flekkefjord, but grew up in Kragerø and decided early to become a sailor. After having graduated with a technical degree from the technical school in Horten in 1882, he emigrated to the United States in 1884. He did not find work in the beginning, but eventually settled in Seattle working for the United States Geological Survey. He is reported to have acquired his first camera in 1886. He opened a photography store in Seattle in 1897, after having visited Norway and married Helen Marie Hutchinson. In 1900, his wife and children moved to Norway, and Wilse himself joined them, opening a photography store in Christiania in 1901, after 17 years in the United States.Wilse traveled extensively in Norway, both on assignment and for his own interest. He brought his 10 kg camera to inaccessible places through rugged terrain, going as far north as Svalbard. He photographed both natural sceneries and people at work, including the fishing industry in Lofoten before the introduction of motorized boats. His photography business was also a commercial success, and he acquired among other things the entire archive of Axel Lindahl, who had photographed scenes in Norway in the 1880s and 1890s.Most of his negatives are now preserved at museums, including Norsk Folkemuseum, where more than 100,000 sceneries and ethnological images are held, Oslo Bymuseum for images related to the history of Oslo, the National Library of Norway for portrait photography, and the Norwegian Maritime Museum for maritime photographs.

Sengo Pérez da Silva

Sengo Pérez da Silva, nacido en Melo, Uruguay, en 1961 es un fotografo uruguayo. Reportero gráfico profesional desde 1982, ha publicando en Semanario Brecha y diarios La República y El Observador (Uruguay) Revistas Veja e Isto é (Brasil) y Boston Globe (EE.UU.) En 1989 se radico en Brasil trabajando para los diarios O Estado de Sao Paulo y Jornal da Tarde. Desde 1990 en Perú como editor gráfico de suplementos en Página Libre, El Suplemento (diario Expreso), diarios Gestión, El Sol, Correo y las revistas deportivas Don Balón y El Gráfico. Productor periodístico de televisión en los canales América TV, canal 4 Y ATV, canal 9. Colaboraciones para las agencias Reuters, Associated Press, France Presse, EFE, la cadena de periódicos KRT (EE.UU.) Bild (Alemania), Houston Chronicle (EE.UU.), UNICEF, y las revistas Rumbos y Somos (El Comercio).

Juan Manuel Figueroa Aznar

Juan Manuel Figueroa Aznar, nacido en 1878, en Caraz, Ancash, fue un fotografo pionero peruano. Es considerado uno de los representantes más destacados del florecimiento fotográfico del Cusco entre inicios y la primera mitad del siglo XX. Artista multifacético, se concibió a sí mismo ante todo como pintor, sin sospechar que una de sus prácticas subsidiarias e intermitentes se apreciaría en las pocas pero importantes antologías del arte fotográfico peruano y latinoamericano. Su predilección por el retrato lo acercó a la fotografía y a una técnica en boga, el foto-óleo o la foto coloreada, técnica que combinaba los barnices de la tradición pictórica occidental con las tendencias modernas. A la manera de Max T. Vargas en Arequipa, en cuyo estudio trabajó como pintor de telones de fondo, introdujo una práctica muy poco frecuente para la época: retratar indígenas en el estudio, un escenario reservado a los pudientes. En la década de los veinte se asoció al círculo intelectual del indigenismo de Luis E. Valcárcel, quien lo nombró director artístico de la Misión Peruana de Arte Incaico que recorrió La Paz, Buenos Aires y Montevideo en 1923, llevando consigo a un equipo de músicos y actores cusqueños que fueron registrados por el lente del fotógrafo. Murio en 1951, en Paucartambo, Cusco.