Nicholas Nixon




Nicholas Nixon, born in 1947, is known for the ease and intimacy of his black and white large format photography. Nixon has photographed porch life in the rural south, schools in and around Boston, cityscapes, sick and dying people, the intimacy of couples, and the ongoing annual portrait of his wife, Bebe, and her three sisters (which he began in 1975). Recording his subjects close and with meticulous detail facilitates the connection between the viewer and the subject. Nixon has been awarded three National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and two Guggenheim Fellowships. In 2014, Nixon’s annual portrait series, The Brown Sisters, reached its 40th anniversary and was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art. In Summer 2013 Nixon’s book Close Far was released by Steidl. The body of work explores the relationship of the self in physical and psychological proximity to the urban landscape. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston exhibited Nicholas Nixon: Family Album, through May 2011. In 2006, Nixon’s ongoing portrait of the Brown sisters was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas. In 2005 Nixon had a solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and the Cincinnati Art Museum. Nixon’s work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, among many others.

 

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The Winners of World Press Photo 2017

The Dive

Sports – Second Prize, Singles Gaël Monfils of France dives for a forehand in his fourth round match against Andrey Kuznetsov of Russia during the 2016 Australian Open at Melbourne Park, Australia. The Australian Open holds the record for the highest attendance at a Grand Slam event.

Medics Assist a Wounded Girl

Spot News – Second Prize, Singles A Syrian girl cries out as a wounded child lies next to her at a makeshift hospital on 12 September 2016. She had been injured in reported government airstrikes on the rebel-held town of Douma, east of Damascus, Syria


Caretta Caretta Trapped

Nature – First Prize, Singles A sea turtle entangled in a fishing net swims off the coast of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.


Big Cat In My Backyard!

Nature – Second Prize, Singles A wild leopard strolls through Sanjay Gandhi National Park, a protected area in the northern part of Mumbai city, India. The leopard is on its nocturnal prowl in the adjacent human settlements in search of food, which in these areas is typically dogs or pigs.

Monarchs In The Snow

Nature – Third Prize, Singles A carpet of monarch butterflies covers the forest floor of El Rosario Butterfly Sanctuary, in Michoacán, Mexico. The storm hit the mountains of Central Mexico, creating havoc in the wintering colonies of monarch butterflies just as they were starting their migration back north to the USA and Canada.

Rhino Wars

Nature – First Prize, Stories A black rhino bull is seen dead, poached for its horns less than 8 hours earlier at Hluhluwe Umfolozi Game Reserve, South Africa. Inside Kruger National Park, the largest rhinoceros reserve in the world, along the border of Mozambique and South Africa, there exists a battle between poachers and small NGOs trying to protect this rare species.


Pandas Gone Wild

Nature – Second Prize, Stories Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a massive wild enclosure at a conservation center in Wolong Nature Reserve


Now You See Me

Nature – Third Prize, Stories Buffalos at the drinking station. These photos combine a well-known natural phenomenon: the starry sky and portraits of wild animals not visible to the naked eye. The series needed very accurate planning, research, and preparation as the photos were made with remote control, and no modification was possible while capturing the photos.

What ISIS Left Behind

People – First Prize, Singles Five-year-old Maha and her family fled from the village Hawija outside Mosul, Iraq, seven days ago. The fear of so-called Islamic State and the lack of food forced them to leave their home, her mother says. Now Maha lays on a dirty mattress in the overcrowded transit center in Debaga’s refugee camp.

Praying for a miracle – mental health problems in disabling environments in Africa

People – Second Prize, Singles Hellen (41) lives with a mental health problem. Her illness developed later in life. In developing countries, over 80 percent of people living with mental health problems do not receive any treatment. In African countries, treatment often comes in the form of prayer from a pastor or traditional healer. Modern medicine is available to very few.

Fidelity

People – Third Prize, Singles A woman strokes a girl’s head as she rests on her lap whilst sitting on a sofa in a police station in Camaguey, Cuba, on 12 February 2016, with a portrait of Fidel Castro hanging above them.

Enfarinat

People – Second Prize, Stories On 28 December each year, the “Floured War,” a 200-year-old tradition, takes place in Ibi in the province of Alicante, Spain. During the festival, the citizens are divided into two groups: the ‘Enfarinat’ (the floured) group simulates a coup d’etat and a second group tries to calm the rebellion. The teams play with flour, water, eggs, and colored smoke bombs

Grand National Steeplechase

Sports – First Prize, Singles Jockey Nina Carberry flies off her horse, Sir Des Champs, as they fall at The Chair fence during the Grand National steeplechase, during day three of the Grand National Meeting at Aintree Racecourse.

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The Winners of World Press Photo 2017

Iraq’s Battle To Reclaim Its Cities

General News – Second Prize, Stories More than two years after the Islamic State first blitzed across Iraq in 2014, Iraqi security forces are scrambling to evict the militant group from Mosul, its last major stronghold in the country. The campaign has displaced nearly 70,000 Iraqis, and may uproot hundreds of thousands more. A family flees the fighting in Mosul, as oil fields burned in Qayyara, Iraq.


Taking A Stand In Baton Rouge

Contemporary Issues – First Prize, Singles Lone activist Ieshia Evans stands her ground while offering her hands for arrest as she is charged by riot police during a protest against police brutality outside the Baton Rouge Police Department in Louisiana. Evans, a 28-year-old Pennsylvania nurse and mother of one, traveled to Baton Rouge to protest against the shooting of Alton Sterling.

Migrant Crossing

Contemporary Issues – Second Prize, Singles A woman is supported by two men while crossing a river, as refugees attempt to reach Macedonia on a route that would bypass the border fence

The Libyan Migrant Trap

Contemporary Issues – Third Prize, Singles Two Nigerian refugees cry and embrace in a detention center for refugees in Surman, Libya. The detention center houses hundreds of women escaping precarious conditions. Many claim they are regularly beaten or sexually assaulted, and receive insufficient amounts of food and water at the center. Most of these women were attempting to reach Europe by being smuggled across the Mediterranean in boats setting sail from neighboring Sabratah.

Victims Of The Zika Virus

Contemporary Issues – Second Prize, Stories In September 2015, babies in Brazil began to be born with microcephaly and other malformations, and in April 2016 the link between the Zika virus and these malformations was confirmed. Marcela (2) observes her sisters in her mother’s lap at the family’s home in the rural area of Areia. Twin sisters Heloisa (left) and Heloá (right) were born seven months prior with microcephaly caused by the Zika virus

Copacabana Palace

Contemporary Issues – Third Prize, Stories “Copacabana Palace,” an ironically named series of condominiums in Brazil, houses more than 300 homeless families. Built more than 30 years ago, construction on this complex was never finished and has since become squatted. A pastor, who also lives in the occupied buildings, explains all the construction problems. A couple of weeks ago, the hall floors from a building crashed down at night.

The Silent Victims Of A Forgotten War

Daily Life – First Prize, Singles Afghanistan has endured armed conflict since 1979, when the Soviet Union invaded. Afghan civilians are at greater risk today than at any time since Taliban rule, which ended in 2001. According to UN statistics, in the first half of 2016 at least 1,600 people died, and more than 3,500 people were injured. At the hospital, Najiba holds her two-year-old nephew Shabir who was injured from a bomb blast in Kabul on 29 March 2016.

Sweat Makes Champions

Daily Life – Second Prize, Singles Four students of a gymnastics school in Xuzhou, China, do toe-pressure training for 30 minutes in the afternoon.

Cuba On The Edge Of Change

Daily Life – First Prize, Stories In December, days after Fidel Castro’s death, his ashes were taken into the countryside, on a route that retraced, in reverse, the steps of the revolution he led in 1959. Towns and villages along the route were emptied of residents as thousands tried to catch a glimpse of Castro’s remains. For many, the death of Fidel Castro felt like that of a father.

Out Of The Way

Daily Life – Second Prize, Stories In Russia’s extreme north, century-long ways of life dominate the daily life of some of the most isolated parts of the desolate landscape. Modern civilization penetrates slowly and fragmentarily. There are no roads, and only one helicopter shuttle twice monthly. The residents’ ancestors can be traced back to hereditary hunters in a small settlement near Nizhnyaya Tunguska River, Russia, more than 300 years ago

Offensive On Mosul

General News – First Prize, Singles The Iraqi Special Operations Forces search houses of Gogjali, an eastern district of Mosul, looking for Daesh members, equipment, and evidence on 2 November 2016.

Left Alone

General News – Second Prize, Singles An 11-year-old girl from Nigeria (left), who said her mother died in Libya, cries next to her 10-year-old brother aboard an NGO rescue boat. The children had sailed for hours in an overcrowded rubber boat with other refugees during a rescue operation on the Mediterranean Sea, about 23 kilometers north of Sabratha, Libya.

Life Inside The Philippines’ Most Overcrowded Jail

General News – Third Prize, Singles An image from Quezon City Jail, one of the Philippines’ most overcrowded prisons. Conditions are getting worse as police wage an unprecedented war on crime. There are 3,800 inmates at the jail, which was built six decades ago to house 800, and they engage in a relentless contest for space. Men take turns to sleep on the cracked cement floor of an open-air basketball court, the steps of staircases, underneath beds and hammocks made out of old blankets.

They Are Slaughtering Us Like Animals

General News – First Prize, Stories President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines began his anti-drug campaign when he took office on 30 June 2016. Since then, more than 2,000 people have been slain at the hands of the police alone. Six-year-old Jimji cries in anguish as she screams “papa” before funeral parlor workers move the body of her father, Jimboy Bolasa, from the wake at the start of the funeral to Navotas Cemetery in Manila, Philippines. Unidentified men abducted Mr. Bolasa and a neighborhood friend one night. Less than an hour later, their beaten bodies, with signs of torture and gunshot wounds, were dumped under a nearby bridge.

Black Days Of Ukraine

Long-Term Projects – First Prize Ordinary people became victims of the conflict between self-proclaimed republics and the official Ukrainian authorities from 2014 onwards in the region of Donbass. Civilians escape from a fire at a house destroyed by an air attack in the Luhanskaya village.

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Doug Caplan

With a photographic career spanning over 20 years, Doug has been focused at producing monochromatic photographic artworks that approach a wide scale of subjects. His work is often presented in a multi-layered way, with an overt attempt to challenge the viewer.

By applying digital alterations and subtle abstraction concepts, Doug investigates the dynamics of landscape, architecture & urban environments, including the manipulation and his personal interpretations of the subject captured. Rather than presenting a factual reality, an illusion is fabricated to conjure the realms of our imagination.

Doug’s photography directly responds to the surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences from the artist as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that go un-noticed

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Viki Kollerová

Is a Slovakian photographer based in Bratislava who is influenced by Frida Kahlo, Francesca Woodman, Marina Abramovic, Maya Deren, Arno Rafael Minkkinen… and the places that embraced her.

More about Viki Kollerová and her works here.

 

Winners of the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

Sardine Run, Grand Prize Winner, and First Place Action Winner. During the sardine migration along the Wild Coast of South Africa, millions of sardines are preyed upon by marine predators such as dolphins, marine birds, sharks, whales, penguins, sailfishes, and sea lions. The hunt begins with common dolphins that have developed special hunting techniques to create and drive bait balls to the surface. In recent years, probably due to overfishing and climate change, the annual sardine run has become more and more unpredictable. It took me two weeks to have the opportunity to witness and capture this marine predation.  © G. Lecoeu

Pacific Storm, 3rd Place, Landscape. An isolated cumulonimbus storm developed over the Pacific Ocean a few miles south of the coast of Panama City. It sat atop a temperature inversion that created a thick overcast layer of clouds. The strong updrafts of the storm quickly reached the tropopause and spread out, creating the characteristic anvil. The strongest updrafts pierced the tropopause and turned into what scientists call the overshooting tops. The entire frame was lit by a single lightning from within the storm in a moonless night on June 16, 2016. © Santiago Borja

Toxic Vanity, 3rd Place, Environmental Issues. This image is a magnification of plastic particles in eyeliner, exploring just one facet of the synthetic swarm suspended in our oceans. The particles, lash-lengthening fibers, illuminating powders, and glitters these products contain are in fact tiny pieces of plastic. Every time we wash these products from our bodies or ingest them as we lick the glosses from our lips, we unknowingly add to the trillions of microplastic particles currently infesting every level of the ocean. This photograph was taken at Falmouth University in Cornwall, United Kingdom, in May 2016 using a reflective photographic microscope with a stacking panoramic process to create the final image. © Eleanor Ryder

Crow Chasing Buffy Owl, Honorable Mention, Animal Portraits. This shot was taken on an early September afternoon along the riverbank at Pasir Ris Park in east Singapore. I was hoping to capture wildlife in action when some movement in the bushes nearby caught my attention. Instinctively, I prepared my equipment to capture any action that might ensue. I was fortunate enough to witness this adult crow chasing an adult buffy fish owl right in front of me, proving at once that the crow was the more aggressive species of the two. The entire spectacle between these day and night creatures lasted less than two seconds and exemplified nature in its uninhibited form.© Kawrence Chia Boon Oo

Approach, 2nd Place, Action. An EF2 tornado bears down on a home in Wray, Colorado, on May 7, 2016. As soon as we were safe, as the tornado roared off into the distance through a field before roping out, we scrambled up the hill to check on the residents. Thankfully, everyone was all right, and we were grateful for that. As I was checking in with a young woman coming out of the basement, we became very aware of a strong new circulation right above our heads. We needed to run for cover and did so before saying a proper goodbye. © Tori O’Shea

Outside Facebook HQ, 2nd Place, Environmental Issues. Eighty percent of the San Francisco Bay Area wetlands—16,500 acres—has been developed for salt mining. Water is channeled into these large ponds, leaves through evaporation, and the salt is then collected. The tint of each pond is an indication of its salinity. Microorganisms inside the pond change color according to the salinity of its environment. This high-salinity salt pond is located right next to Facebook headquarters, where about 4,000 people work every day. © Chris McCann

No Snow, No Ice? Honorable Mention, Environmental Issues. A solitary bear sits on the edge of Barter Island, Alaska. There is no snow when, at this time of year, there should be. The locals in Kaktovik noted that it’s been an unseasonably warm winter, and that the ice will be late in forming this year. This will have an impact on the local polar bear population when it comes time to hunt seals for their food in the winter months. © Patty Waymire

Wildfire at the beach, Honorable Mention, Environmental Issues. A young woman in a bikini looks at an approaching forest fire near the beach. A firefighting plane drops water to extinguish the wildfire. This image was taken at the beach of Son Serra, on the island of Mallorca, on August 18, 2016. © Sergej Chursyn

Proud Momma, 2nd Place. Animal Portraits. A female peacock bass guards her brood in a Miami, Florida, freshwater lake. She will protect her young fry from a variety of predatory fish until they are large enough to fend for themselves. This tropical freshwater species, also known as the peacock cichlid, was introduced in Florida in the mid-1980s from South America to control the tilapia population, another invasive species. Throughout its native range (and in Florida) it’s a prized sportfish known for its fighting spirit. © Michael O’Neill

Wild Rink, 2nd Place, Landscape. The first cold days of winter have frozen the surface of a pond, and the first snowfall has revealed its delicate beauty. In low-pressure conditions, southwest winds push the clouds against the vertical peaks of the Pale di San Martino. At dusk, a long shutter speed enhances the movement of the clouds around Cimon della Pala, one of the highest peaks in the Dolomites. © Alessandro Gruzza

Dragging You Deep Into the Woods! 1st Place, Animal Portraits. I shot this at Amboli, Maharashtra, India, on July 24, 2016, during a morning stroll into the blissful rain forest. Ceaseless drizzles dampened the woods for 10 hours a day; the serene gloom kept me guessing if it was night or day. The heavy fog, chilling breeze, and perennial silence could calm roaring sprits. And there I saw this beauty. I wondered if I needed more reasons to capture the habitat, for I was blessed to see this at the place I was at. I immediately switched from the macro to the wide-angle lens and composed this frame. © Varun Aditya

Serendipitous Green Meteor, Honorable Mention, Landscape. Anand Varma was visiting me and I was showing him around a mountain range in South India called the Western Ghats. We camped on the side of a road and I set up my Nikon D600 and a 24-70mm lens to take 15-second exposures. I set the camera to take 999 images. I slept next to the camera and it continued taking pictures until dawn. It wasn’t until the next afternoon that I reviewed my images and noticed something unusually bright and green. I showed it to Anand, and we realized that I had captured an extremely rare event. After checking with a few experts, I learned that it was a green meteorite, and getting it on camera is very rare. This is an example of being at the right place at the right time to capture something totally unexpected. For those 15 seconds, I was the luckiest photographer on the planet. © Prasenjeet Yadav

Great Egrets Take Flight, 3rd Place, Action. A remarkable conservation success story, the graceful great egret was saved from the brink of disappearance in Hungary, where in 1921 there were only 31 mating pairs remaining. Less than a century later, international conservation efforts have triumphed. We can now count over 3,000 mating pairs in Hungary alone. Today, although their numbers are continuing to climb, the great egret remains the Hungarian Nature Conservation’s symbol, and they are still considered an endangered species that must be carefully protected. The birds are most active at dawn and dusk, and here they’re squabbling over food and jostling for space in the crowded swamp. © Zsolt Kudich

Jellyfish Feast, Honorable Mention, Action. I came across this jellyfish on a dive in Byron Bay, Australia. At the time there was a single turtle eating various parts of the jellyfish. Soon, two more turtles arrived in full force and started a tug-of-war to keep the best bits of the jellyfish. I moved in closer to position myself in between the action as the turtles snapped at each other and continued to eat, oblivious to my presence. Soon there was little left of this giant jellyfish, and a small group of fish were evicted from their shelter within the stinging tentacles. © Scott Portelli

Friendship Knows No Color, 3rd Place, Animal Portraits. Two bodies of Empusa pennata in the same plant was the rare scene I found when I visited one of my favorite locations for macro shots. This area is located near a village called Las Rozas in Madrid, Spain. There’s a small stream about one kilometer long where you can find a varied ecosystem with many different types of insects and arachnids. From May to September, I had seen up to four different Empusas alone on their plants, but on this day I was extremely lucky when I found two individuals on the same plant. I took advantage of such a discovery and mounted my macro set and took several photos of this magical scene, where the Empusas seem to play or dance, sharing the same plant like good friends. © Jose Pesquero Gomez

The 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year has been named! We received thousands of photos that showcase the awe-inspiring and diverse natural world around usSee all the winning images and explore the judges’ top photo selections. 

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The art of wine

A Romanian farmer shows his happiness after the harvest in Maramures. The population of this region still maintains a strong connection to the land and still carries out many agricultural activities manually. Gianluca De Bartolo

An autumnal glimpse of Cuneo’s Langhe taken at La Morra, portrays a wine producing area near Alba in a moment in which the light increases the beauty of the vineyards’ colors. Valentina Galvagno

This project carried out by locals is for aging wine directly in the ground which is rich in minerals, and makes the already awesome landscape of Lanzarote even more interesting. Francisco Mingorance 

 

In this photo we can see the Vineyards of Monferrato exalted by the radiant light which caresses the valley enhancing the typical autumn colors of the rows of vines. Roberto Tagliani

 

I took this shot from the suggestive La Morra’s Belvedere. During autumn, the hills of the Langhe area present a variety of colors and shades, from red to yellow, from green to brown. Franco Cappellari

A Moldovan vineyard photographed during the winter season is enhanced by the geometrical connotation of the image attained through the texture of the rows and the dividing line drawn by the road that separates two vine varieties Anatolie Poiata

 

This image is about the traditional grape harvest in Sicily. The title in dialect refers to the must, picked and pressed in a cylindric shape. In this picture, you can see all the wine flowing from the pressed must. Riccardo Colelli

 

This shot captures the moment after harvesting in which the grapes are arranged by a Sicilian farmer before they are to be pressed. Riccardo Colelli

 

A stage of the process of Chines wine making. This distilled wine is made with a brewing process which is thousands of years old and has been declared as intangible cultural heritage of China. Xiaolong Guo 

 

Charlotte Green, castle owner in Seggiano, discovered some old Etruscan wine-making basins. Here she is taking a rest in one of them with her Sangiovese grapes. Bruno Bruchi

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2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest


Buffalo Mud Bath.” An African Buffalo full of mud late in the afternoon in the Masai Mara, Kenya. A different portrait for this powerful animal. Chris Schmid


“Atlantic Puffin.” A closeup of an Atlantic Puffin on the protected nesting site of Machias Seal Island, off the coast of Maine. Access to the island is very restricted for the benefit of the puffins. It was an amazing experience to be up so close to these beautiful and unique birds that spend the majority of their lives at sea. Harry Collins


“Congeal.” A jelly-like wave curls in multiple layers over a shallow reef on the New South Wales South Coast, Australia. When there’s no wind on the ocean’s surface, waves can can look like surreal sheets of melting glass. Warren Keelan


Paradise for Flamingoes 2.” Thousands of flamingoes live in Lake Bogoria [in Kenya] where it’s like paradise for them. Yu Huiping


“Pop the Top.” Waves shoot high into the evening air like champagne at a party in a celebration of life and the joy of being in nature. Na Pali Coast, Hawaii. Lee Scott


“Celestial Terrestrial #1.” The alien-looking southern calamari squid is native to Australian and New Zealand coastlines. Its dot-painting-like skin patterns are reminiscent of ancient Aboriginal paintings. It took me several weeks of night dives and patience to achieve this unique portrait: When I shot this frame I was elated!! Matthew Smith


“American Flowers #1.” In Greenland’s pristine landscape lies a US Air Force base which was abandoned in 1947 and everything was left behind: vehicles, asbestos laced structures, and over 10,000 aviation fuel barrels. The Inuits who live in the region call the rusted remains American Flowers. In 2014 and 2015 I camped out solo to photograph it. In 2015 my 5 day solo camping trip turned into 8, as I couldn’t get picked up due to the weather. Ken Bower


“Washing Highline in Kjerag.” In Norway, above the fjord, Paulo enjoys highlining at 980 meters above the ground, drying some laundry at the same time.  Fred Marie


“The Frozen Pond With Snow.” The famous “Blue Pond” in Hokkaido Biei-cho, Japan. The scheduled illumination period for the pond this year will be from November 1, 2016 to February 28, 2017. We, all the residents who are living in Biei town, are expecting more tourists from all over the world coming to visit us this year.  Kent Shiraishi

“From Floor to Cloud.” In Pienza, Tuscany, I was waiting for this lightning! Gilbert Fitoussi


“Skeeter Attack.” A group of mosquitos attack a snapping turtle. Each year, snapping turtles emerge from the wetlands at Bombay Hook NWR in Delaware. The mosquitos are particularly bad in this area and swarm these turtles.  Jerry am Ende


“Microscopic Underwater Butterfly.” Another delicate and beautiful underwater creature that appears during the vertical migration. This is the largest migration on Earth, and it occurs every night in the oceans around the world. Tiny planktonic creatures, larval forms, and pelagic miniatures come up to feed in the dead of night. This photo [was] taken in the Gulf Stream Current off SE Florida, in the Atlantic Ocean.  Suzan Meldonian


“Bear Hug.” Brown Bears, Katmai National Park, Alaska.  Aaron Baggenstos

“Pacific Storm.” A colossal cumulonimbus flashes over the Pacific Ocean as we circle around it at 37,000 feet en route to South America.  Santiago Borja

I was on a photographic safari in Chobe River, Botswana in April 2016 when I took this image. At this time of the year the water levels are high and herds of hippopotamus share the tributaries. This particular bull was very territorial and liked a mock charge whenever our boat (driven by a qualified local guide) passed his patch of the river on our daily outings. On this occasion, I pre-focussed my 600mm lens and fired a few shots at a safe distance and got this golden hour shot!

“Territorial Hippo.” I was on a photographic safari in Chobe River, Botswana in April 2016 when I took this image. At this time of the year the water levels are high and herds of hippopotamus share the tributaries. This particular bull was very territorial and liked to mock charge whenever our boat (driven by a qualified local guide) passed his patch of the river on our daily outings. On this occasion, I pre-focussed my 600mm lens and fired a few shots at a safe distance and got this golden hour shot! Sam Kurtul

National Geographic Magazine has opened its annual photo contest, with the deadline for submissions coming up on November 4. The Grand Prize Winner will receive a 10-day trip for two to the Galapagos Islands. The kind folks at National Geographic were once more kind enough to let me choose among the contest entries so far for display here. The captions below were written by the individual photographers

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Christian Brogi

Christian Brogi is a creative artist who expresses his talent in various disciplines, from the most modern, multimedia, classic ones, such as music composition, animation, photography, sculpture, film. His research is a multi-faceted, multi-faceted artist who shows in his works on multiple levels, from the formal to the emotional. The work of art becomes in this way the ideal means to communicate its presence in the new modern painting

Fábio Miguel Roque

Fábio Miguel Roque is a photographer born in Lisbon and based in Sintra, Portugal.
He studied photography at I.P.F. (Portuguese Institute of Photography), Lisbon between 2004 and 2007, later He then attended the workshops of History of Photography Contemporary at Ar.Co., 2010, and Photojournalism in MEF, 2013.
Worked as a photojournalist at the beginning of his career.
His work is mainly on documentary photography; more recently discovered is passion for a more personal kind of photography.
Has already made several solo exhibitions.
Runs the small publishing house, “The Unknown Books”.
Founding member of Preto Collective, a black and white photo collective.
Is member of the global photo collective, Latent Image Collective

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Consuelo Kanaga

Consuelo Kanaga, one of the pioneers of modern American photography, began her career as a photojournalist in 1915 in San Francisco. In the 1920s, Alfred Stieglitz inspired her to develop a more aesthetic approach, and a trip to Europe in 1928 awakened her lifelong preoccupation with European modernist painting and the ways in which that work was influenced by the sculpture of Africa. Kanaga successfully combined a Pictorialist aesthetic with a realist strategy, producing handsomely composed and carefully printed images. She was one of few white American photographers in the 1930s to make artistic portraits of African Americans.

In Frances with a Flower, the focus is so sharp that the slightly rough texture of the woman’s skin, shiny with perspiration at the hairline, seems palpable. The forehead, nose, and cheeks, highlighted by flash, contrast with the deep-set eyes lost in shadow, thus producing a sculptural dimension that turns the photograph into hills and valleys of light. The stark white blossom pressed to the woman’s nose emphasizes the sensuality of her face.

Rodney Smith


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Martine Franck

Martine Franck (April 2, 1938 – August 16, 2012) was a well-known Belgian documentary and portrait photographer, and the second wife of Henri Cartier-Bresson. A member of Magnum Photos for over 32 years, Franck was also co-founder and president of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation.

Elena Gallotta

Elena Gallotta is an Italian born fine-art photographer currently based in Ireland.

She comes from a ballet and theatre background which strongly influences her work.

Her images reflect her relationship with dance and non-verbal communication itself.

Her work can often be defined as an antropolologic study of the the human body and it’s mysterious subtle language.

Elena’s way of composing a picture and working with the light is hugely inspired by her passion for paintings, especially the Old Masters.

She has been published in numerous art magazines throughout Europe. In 2009 she went back to her first love when she was commissioned to make a short dance film by the Irish Arts Council.

She collaborated with two major dance performers from France and the film was a very productive visual-kinetic exchange between them all. The final result, “Story of One” was selected and screened in the Oxford Dance Festival in 2010.

Biswas Debanjan

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2016 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest


Barbara Dall’Angelo


Yuval Ofek


Gregory Lecoeur


Kiel Bristow


Amos Nachoum


Anabel Vargas


Jean Tmr


John Rollins


David Nam Lip Lee


Mark Meyer


Bill Klipp


Michel Zoghzoghi


Brett Rylance

This photo was taken on a summer morning. The weather is not prefaced any good, the mountains were completely shrouded by clouds. Only 5 short minutes the clouds have left to breathe a bit 'mountains before covering all again.

Federica Violin

The deadline to enter the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest is fast approaching—entries will be accepted until May 27, 2016. The grand prize winner will receive a seven-day Polar Bear Safari for two in Churchill, Canada. National Geographic was once more kind enough to allow me to share some of this year’s entries with you here, gathered from three categories: Nature, Cities, and People.

Finbarr O’Reilly

The best stories are those that challenge preconceived notions about a place or an issue, that challenge stereotypes and make people rethink their view on things

Paul Strand

Along with Edward Weston and Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand was one of the defining masters of early American modernist photography. Strand was introduced to photography by the renowned social documentarian Lewis Hine, who instilled in him an understanding of the photograph as a powerful tool that should be used for the betterment of humanity. Finding his own vision, in the early 20th century Strand began taking the photographs for which he is best known: scenes of urban hustle and bustle, formal abstractions, and street portraits.

Ralph Gibson

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Mahesh Balasubramanian

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