Wolfgang Tillmans

Central to Tillmans’ career has been an extended flirtation with banality, pursued not merely for its own sake, in a spirit of slacker irony, but with the deep, philosophical conviction that no aspect of the social, physical or political world is devoid of meaning or unworthy of investigation. If individual images occasionally fall flat out of context . . . it needn’t detract from virtue of the pursuit and the value of such a holisitic perspective.” In other words, if one thing matters, everything matters.

Holly Myers

René Groebli

Réne Groebli was born in Zurich, Switzerland. In the 1940s he studied under the noted photographer, Hans Finsler. In 1949 he secured his place among European post-war artists with his iconic portfolio Magic of the Rail. By the early 1950s, Groebli was working as a photographer for Life, Picture Post and other international magazines and participated in the first Subjektive Fototgraphie exhibition in Saarbrüken. In 1955, he was included in the Family of Man exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. In subsequent years, the artist opened a studio for industrial and advertising photography, and continued his personal work through the present day. In 1999, the Zurich Kunsthaus Art Museum showed a retrospective of his photographs from the years 1946 to 1996. Groebli currently resides in Switzerland.

Fabienne Collard

I’m a young belgian photographer.
In a few words, I just love telling stories in squares. Mood is very precious in my pictures. I took my pictures with a Fuji x100, an holga and sometimes with my phone.
Winner of Ilford B&W award in 2013, I was also published in several photo magazines.

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Martin Chamberlain

I am a photographer based in London, UK. Many of the images on this website have featured in exhibitions around the world, including Australia, Nepal, Qatar, Austria, Italy, Czech Republic, Luxemburg and the UK. They have also featured in numerous magazines and books on travel photography.

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Debbie Caffery

Caffery has been making photographs of the people and culture of her native Louisiana for over 30 years. Past projects include documentation of sugarcane field and mill workers, alligator hunting, and family portraits in Louisiana, as well as photographs of rural Mexico and Portugal. She will soon publish a new book documenting prostitution in Mexico. Caffery’s work has been included in solo exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, Cleveland Museum of Art, Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Photography, and the Gitterman Gallery, New York.

She has received numerous awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship (2005), the first Lou Stoumen Prize (1996), and the Louisiana Governor’s Art Award (1990). Her work is included in the permanent collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian Institution, Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the New Orleans Museum of Art. Caffery has published several highly praised books, including Polly, The Shadows, and Carry Me Home.

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Nicolás Muller

 

Frank Eugene

Frank Eugene Smith, who was later known by his artist name Frank Eugene and who adopted German citizenship in 1906, was born in New York in 1865. After a first training at the City College, Eugene began to study painting in New York in 1884 and switched to the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich in 1886. During his years of study Eugene began to be interested in the new media of photography and studied further autodidactically. As soon as 1889 Eugene had his first one-man show at the Camera-Club’ in New York, which was founded by Alfred Stieglitz. After his graduation Eugene returned to New York in 1894 and worked for some years as a stage designer and portrait painter, specialising in portraying well-known theatre-actors. Since 1900 he lived in Germany again and got envolved with artistic photography, was admitted to the Linked ring’ in London and founded – together with Stieglitz and Edward Steichen – the American photographer’s society Photo-Session’. Between 1904 and 1910 Eugene’s works were published as heliographs in the advanced photography journal Camera Work’ and became internationally known. Eugene orientated himself in his photographs at painting, following the romanticising style of art photography: Eugene’s treatment of the negatives with opaque colours and etching needle led to his wanted pictorial and graphic effects and with his favoured techniques like platinum print and the rubber-bichrome.technique, he achieved the modern blur of his positives. Since 1907 Eugene began his educational work at the Lehr-und Versuchsanstalt für Fotographie in Munich, which he continued at his chair for artistic photography at the Königliche Akademie für Grafische Künste in Leipzig in 1913. In 1907 Eugene organised a meeting between Stieglitz, Steichen and Heinrich Kühn and brought forward the assimilation of German art photographers to American guidelines. Frank Eugene died in Munich in 1936.

Fernando Lemos

 

Fernando Lemos is a painter, graphic artist and photographer from Portugal.

Early in his career, in 1960 , Fernando Lemos, photographer from Portugal, is participating in intellectual resistance movement against the dictatorship of Salazar. His Production is experimental, close to the experimental nature inspired by work of Man Ray.

He came in Brazil and lived in the Pension Maua , in Rio de Janeiro, where he photographs writers and artists. In 1953 , some of his photos are display at the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo – MAM / SP [ Museum of Modern Art of São Paulo ] and the Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro – MAM / RJ [ Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro ] . His works resemble those of modern Brazilian photographers of the late 1940s, related to Foto Cine Clube Bandeirante [Photo Film Club Bandeirante] .

Fernando Lemos still working with construction techniques and organization of space , as in Luz Teimosa [ Stubborn Light ] , 1951/1952 , where the light is revealed in lines that intersect , in a subtle way , an atmosphere confined . The brief period during which he devoted himself more intensely to photography ends shortly after his arrival in Brazil. He began to work with drawing and painting and produces non- figurative works . He first uses shapes cut out the background , often close to graphic signs in compositions mainly structured by line , as in Símbolos [ Symbols ] , 1967. In other works , he uses geometry as an expressive form , and also creates organic forms evoking symbols. It also explores the luminosity of watercolor.

Fernando Lemos also works with visual communication and graphic planning, and as an illustrator for several publications. With Décio Pignatari (1927) , he led the design studio Maitiry in São Paulo. His design work is still not well known

Max Dupain

Max Dupain was Australia’s most respected and influential black & white photographer of the 20th century. His images capture a long gone era in which Australian society was vastly different from what it is now. With his documentary eye his images exude quality and demonstrate Dupain’s mastership of light and form.

Dupain was considered the pioneer of modernism in Australian photography, an approach that departed from the sentimentality of soft focused, nostalgic imagery to the simplified world of light contrasts, sharp focus, varying angles and creative compositions.

Ferdinando Scianna

 

 

 



Ferdinando Scianna started taking photographs in the 1960s while studying literature, philosophy and art history at the University of Palermo. It was then that he began to photograph the Sicilian people systematically. Feste Religiose in Sicilia (1965) included an essay by the Sicilian writer Leonardo Sciascia, and it was the first of many collaborations with famous writers.

Scianna moved to Milan in 1966. The following year he started working for the weekly magazine L’Europeo, first as a photographer, then from 1973 as a journalist. He also wrote on politics for Le Monde Diplomatique and on literature and photography for La Quinzaine Littéraire.

In 1977 he published Les Siciliens in France and La Villa Dei Mostri in Italy. During this period Scianna met Henri Cartier-Bresson, and in 1982 he joined Magnum Photos. He entered the field of fashion photography in the late 1980s. At the end of the decade he published a retrospective, Le Forme del Caos (1989).

Scianna returned to exploring the meaning of religious rituals with Viaggio a Lourdes (1995), then two years later he published a collection of images of sleepers – Dormire Forse Sognare (To Sleep, Perchance to Dream). His portraits of the Argentinean writer Jorge Luis Borges were published in 1999, and in the same year the exhibition Niños del Mundo displayed Scianna’s images of children from around the world.

In 2002 Scianna completed Quelli di Bagheria, a book on his home town in Sicily, in which he tries to reconstruct the atmosphere of his youth through writings and photographs of Bagheria and the people who live there.

Josef Breitenbach

 

 

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Josef Breitenbach was born on the 3rd of April 1896 into a middle-class wine-merchant family of Jewish descent. He attended technical high school from 1912–15 and trained as a salesman for an instrument firm and later as a book keeper for an insurance firm. He attended Ludwig-Maximillian University in Munich (philosophy and art history, 1914 to 1917) and became active in the Youth Section and later the Pacifist wing of the Social Democratic Party. In 1918, he took part in the Soviet-inspired Bavarian coup d’état, which was the first spark of the revolutionary fire that swept over Germany in the wake of the armistice. For a few months, Breitenbach also occupied an official position in the new government. Although the revolution was short-lived, the ties he forged with the radical circles of Munich’s intelligentsia later helped him establish his reputation as a photographer.

In 1932, after several unsuccessful years at the head of the family business—during which period he was mainly engaged with perfecting his use of a camera—Breitenbach opened his first photographic studio. His clients were prominent members of Munich’s bohemia, including actors and actresses performing in the Munich theater. Munich was a stronghold of libertarians and refined people, whose spirit Breitenbach captured in theatrical portraits of his friend, the journalist Theo Riegler. This world vanished in 1933 with Hitler’s takeover.

More than his Jewish roots, the photographer’s political past made him a target for persecution. In August, 1933, a band of Sturmabteilung (SA) storm troopers, members of Hitler’s private army, banged on the door of his studio. Using a portrait of German nobleman Franz von Papen he’d taken the year before when he was Chancellor of Germany, and a letter of thanks he’d received, Breitenbach convinced the troopers that he was under Papen’s protection. With his passport about to expire, Breitenbach made his way to France a few days later, joining other German exiles seeking refuge in Paris.

 The Surrealist “revolution” had by then become dominant in the Parisian art scene. Soon after his arrival, Breitenbach came into contact with André Breton and his circle. Preferring to retain his independence, he never became a member of the Surrealist group, but did show work in important exhibitions of Surrealist photography alongside Man Ray, Jacques-André Boiffard, Brassaï, Eli Lotar, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Roger Parry.

Breitenbach only lived in Paris for six years, until the war broke out in 1939. Yet during this period, he produced some of his most inventive work. He adopted several techniques favored by new photographers such as superimpression, montage, solarization, printing in negative, and the photogram. More importantly, he was one of the rare artists of the pre-War years to produce color photographs, which he did by using processes of bleaching, toning and pigmentation. Examples are the images “Montparnasse”, “Portrait of a Woman in Black and Red”, and Forever and Ever.

During his years in Paris, he was also an active member of the German exile community, which alerted the democratic world to the threat of fascism. He participated in the 1938 exhibition by the Union des Artistes Allemandes Libres, “Five Years of Hitler Dictatorship”. A high point for Breitenbach was his collaboration with Bertolt Brecht, summarized by portraits of the playwright. The war interrupted this second chapter of the photographer’s life. Interned by the French as a suspicious alien, then drafted into a civilian corps composed of foreigners, Breitenbach eventually escaped to New York from Marseille in 1941.

Breitenbach seemingly had no trouble adjusting to America. New York, the city in which he would spend the rest of his life, became home to him, as evidenced by his photomontage of 1942, “We New Yorkers”. He responded to the electric beat of the city, composing photographs such as “Radio City” (1942) that have a jazz-like quality.

 The 1950s and 1960s were years of intense activity for Breitenbach. He did photographic reportage in Asia for the United Nations and other varied businesses, documenting relief work. He exhibited his photographs extensively in the United States from the 1940s to the mid-1960s, including at the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The time not spent on the road was spent absorbed by his teaching at Cooper Union and The New School.

Since his death in New York on the 7th of October 1984, there have been 26 one person exhibitions of his work, shown in New York, Paris, Berlin, Munich, and multiple other locations in both Europe in the United States. Eight books have been published on his work, including two by Larissa Dryansky (Josef Breitenbach and Josef Breitenbach Manifesto) and Josef Breitenbach Photographien, published by Schirmer/Mosel. The Josef Breitenbach archive is located at the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, Tucso

Colin Templeton

I am a Glasgow-based, award-winning photographer with 22 years’ experience in news, features, PR, and sport. My work has appeared across the board, including The Guardian, The Times, The Sunday Times, The Independent, The Sun, Daily Express, The Mirror, Sunday Mirror, Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, Daily Record, Sunday Mail, The Scotsman, Scotland on Sunday, HELLO! magazine, Black + White Photography magazine and Leica Fotografie International magazine. Formerly a staff photographer with national titles The Herald/Sunday Herald/The National/Evening Times, I’m now freelancing in central Scotland, and beyond.

My in-depth experience of how PR and newspapers work means that I know what will work in a picture and, just as importantly, what won’t.

I studied photography at Glasgow College of Building and Printing and got my break shooting football matches for the Scottish Sun.

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Ana Conde

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Kansuke Yamamoto

 

The son of an amateur pictorialist photographer, Yamamoto Kansuke first studied French poetry and literature in Tokyo while he experimented with creative collages and photography influenced by European Surrealism and in particular Marcel Duchamp, René Magritte and Man Ray. At the end of the 1930s, he became a member of the avant-garde artistic movement, VOU and helped establish the Nagoya Foto Avant-Garde which encouraged innovative photography. Yamamoto Kansuke pioneered a poetic and elaborate signature style that merged European-inspired Surrealist iconography with distinctly Japanese motifs and concerns. The Japanese photographer appreciated Surrealism’s anti-establishment and anti-war positions as well as its bizarre takes on the human subconscious: ‘Artwork comes out of some disobedient spirit against readymade things of society. … Pure spirit should be a proactive spirit that attracts a new generation … Rebellion against each generation and the reformation of a generation is our purpose.’ These characteristics threatened Japanese Surrealists with imprisonment while Western members of the movement strongly denied to bestow them with legitimacy. Yamamoto Kansuke nonetheless continued to create dark and complex works that reflected on freedom – often symbolized by the birdcage motif – and war as he addressed World War II with his Premonition of Genocide

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Caspar Claasen

I’m a photographer based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. I am fascinated by extraordinary interactions between people, often individuals, and their everyday surroundings.

How an apparently everyday moment can become a short story when photographed.

How a non–scripted moment can appear so surreal, meaningful, esthetic or humorous that it looks scripted. But it isn’t.

I am thrilled when I succeed in doing this.

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Iwata Nakayama

Iwata Nakayama was a renowned Japanese photographer born in 1895 in Yanagawa, in Fukuoka.

His father was an inventor who held a patent of a fire extinguisher. Iwata moved to Tokyo and was educated in a private school Kyohoku-Chūgakkō. After graduating from that school, he entered Tokyo University of the Arts as a first student of its photography course. After learning artistic and commercial techniques there, he moved to the U.S. in 1918 as an overseas student of California State University, sent by Japan government. However he quit studying and began to work at a photo studio run by Tōyō Kikuchi in New York. With his practical skills, he established his own studio, Laquan Studio, in New York.

Nakayama succeeded as an artisan, and traveled around Europe with his wife Masako and his son Iwao . He stayed in Paris and he came to know Man Ray and László Moholy-Nagy and their works (but he wrote that he didn’t follow their style). And he and his family went back to Japan in 1927.

He began to work as a professional photographer in Kobe and drove Japanese Avant-garde Photo Arts. He associated Ashiya Camera Kurabu and educated some his juniors. And released some works in the magazines Asahi Camera, Nihon Shashin Nenkan and so on. Furthermore, he made one of the first commercial montage photography in 1930.

In 1932, he, Yasuzō Nojima and Nobuo Ina published their monthly magazine Kōga. This magazine was a critical turning point of Japanese artistic photography. Nakayama was a pioneer of Japanese avant-garde photography and inspired many Japanese photographers through his those works.

During World War II, he couldn’t work to the full. His works became more and more abstract. The War over, he resumed his professional work and creating new artistic pieces, but in 1949, he suddenly died (at 54). It was just a few days after he was selected as a trustee of the Japanese Photography Association.

Imogen Cunningham

Imogen Cunningham occupies a singular position in the history of American art of the twentieth century. For over half the history of photography, she explored- with innovation and a new perspective- all the major traditions associated with the medium as fine art.

Cunningham has been most widely acclaimed for the photographs made during the 1920s and 1930s, particularly close-up images of plants and nudes. She also made portraits which are now considered classics in photography, including images of Alfred Stieglitz, Spencer Tracy, and Martha Graham.

She was a founding member of the West Coast-based Group f.64, which championed an un-manipulated, direct approach with the camera, or “straight” photography. Her photographs are represented in major collections and museums around the world.

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Émile Savitry

The Académie de la Grande Chaumière, cafés like Le Dôme, La Rotonde, and La Coupole, artists’ studios where nude models used to pose, Boulevard Edgar Quinet and jazz clubs: this was the heart of Montparnasse where Émile Savory began his painting career, started as photographer, and frequented his sculptors, painters, poets and musicians friends. It was there that this talented jack-of-all-trades who “had many strings to his bow ” lived his entire life.

His work revived “the hot hours of Montparnasse”, this artistic, friendly hotspot rooted in the smoky atmosphere of the cafés of the Vavin crossroads. There, one could see Alberto Giacometti, Victor Brauner and Antoine Prinner who Savitry photographed in the intimacy of their studios; Samuel Granowski, captured at the bar of La Rotonde; Pablo Neruda, returning from Spain after the French victory, here he was photographed at La Coupole with Paul Grimault and some Latin-American friends, mourning the Spanish Republic which he had always supported.

It was after his return from the Pacific Islands (where he had fled, frightened from a success too quickly acquired during his first painting exhibition at Galerie Zborowski in 1929) that he met Django Reinhardt at the port of Toulon. He offered room and board to the still unknown gypsy guitarist and introduced him to the music of Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong. The Reinhardt family soon joined Savitry in Paris and took refuge from time to time in the photographer’s beautiful apartment on Boulevard Edgar Quinet, made evident in a few touching photographs.

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Mark Citret

Mark Citret was born in 1949 in Buffalo, New York, and grew up in San Francisco. He began photographing seriously in 1968, and received both his BA and MA in Art from San Francisco State University.

Most of Citret’s work is not specific to any locale or subject matter. Still, he has worked on many photographic projects over the course of his career, and continues to do so. From 1973 to 1975 he lived in and photographed Halcott Center, a farming valley in New York’s Catskill Mountains. In the mid to late 1980s he produced a large body of work with the working title of “Unnatural Wonders”, which is his personal survey of architecture in the national parks. He spent four years, 1990 to 1993, photographing a massive construction site in the southwest corner of San Francisco.

Since he moved to his current home in 1986, he has been photographing the ever changing play of ocean and sky from the cliff behind his house. Currently he is in the midst of a multi-year commission from the University of California San Francisco, photographing the construction of their 43 acre Mission Bay life-sciences campus.

Alan Hunter

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Alan Hunter (b. 1985) is a Seattle-based photographer, artist, and carpenter. He enjoys building and destroying, road trips, chopping wood, winter, black coffee, the forest, heavy metal, mutts, hops, and tacos.