Courage, Steve McCurry

I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it.

The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.

Nelson Mandela

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Imogen Cunningham

Imogen Cunningham occupies a singular position in the history of American art of the twentieth century. For over half the history of photography, she explored- with innovation and a new perspective- all the major traditions associated with the medium as fine art.

Cunningham has been most widely acclaimed for the photographs made during the 1920s and 1930s, particularly close-up images of plants and nudes. She also made portraits which are now considered classics in photography, including images of Alfred Stieglitz, Spencer Tracy, and Martha Graham.

She was a founding member of the West Coast-based Group f.64, which championed an un-manipulated, direct approach with the camera, or “straight” photography. Her photographs are represented in major collections and museums around the world.

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Rick Gallina

I love portraiture. But perhaps more, I love exploring unknown places and stumbling across an interesting person and setting. I have been fortunate enough to randomly meet kind people who were generous enough to allow me to photograph them. Some of my favorite examples of these instances are below

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Valérie Jardin

Photography changed my life. The day I picked up a camera I became a storyteller. I learned to see the extraordinary in everyday life. And my passion for documenting humankind has led me to find beauty in the most unlikely of places. As a visual storyteller, photographic images are how I tell these stories. Chasing light is my desire, my obsession, my addiction.

Chasing Light.

The camera is an extension of my vision. It captures what I see. Images help me tell the story of the light I chase in the urban landscapes I visit. Every time I make an image, I capture a moment in time that will never occur again. Each frame I shoot becomes extraordinary in its uniqueness. The people. The architecture. The light. The shadows. When they come together, they form the stories of the cities that I want to show my students.

Telling Stories.

My love of humankind drives me to wander the city streets tirelessly to capture the candid moments of daily life. These are the everyday moments most people would not see. These are the moments I want to find and tell.

I thrive on searching and waiting for just the right moment when a story unfolds in a single frame; where context and subject intersect with me there, honored to tell its story to the world. And I am happiest when I get lost on purpose, and let the city reveal its magic to me. The urban landscape is always surprising me with the new stories that unfold throughout the day and into the night.

With this, photography continues to change my life.

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Dennis Mecham

I am, for the most part, self-taught. I can be very focused and can be very patient. I have a strong sense of perseverance which has helped immensely. The art form in which I had more formal training was music. I have found it to be a great asset in the photographic journey. Music requires a devotion and discipline which helps me daily in my photography.

Music, too, requires the merging of artistic expression and musical craft. You have to be both an artist and a technician. Photographers have a distinct advantage over musicians.

If you don’t practice your instrument every day, your skills can diminish noticeably. That doesn’t happen if you don’t take photographs for a few days. Because of the necessity for that mind/body interface, music is more demanding.

Describing my work through words seems rather crude compared to images. Words always qualify an experience that always falls short, with the exception of poetry. I think my work expresses what we are all doing. Finding our place in this life and to experience it on the fullest level possible. We are all searching to discover who we are, which I believe is the main purpose of existence.

With many of my images the concept is fixed in my mind as to what I want to achieve; the composition is there. I always leave room for spontaneity and surprises. I’m not very good at taking snapshots. Though I can take advantage of spontaneity, there has to be some main idea of what I am trying to achieve before I work on it or I burn up a lot of film and never achieve anything.

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Estevan Oriol

Estevan Oriol is an internationally celebrated professional photographer, director and urban lifestyle entrepreneur. Beginning his career as a hip-hop club bouncer turned tour manager for popular Los Angeles-based rap groups Cypress Hill and House of Pain, Estevan’s passion for photography developed while traveling the world. With an influential nudge and old camera from his father, renowned photographer Eriberto Oriol, Estevan began documenting life on the road and established a name for himself amid the emerging hip-hop scene.

Nearly 20 years later, Oriol’s extensive portfolio juxtaposes the glamorous and gritty planes of LA culture, featuring portraits of famous athletes, artists, celebrities and musicians as well as Latino, urban, gang, and tattoo counterculture lifestyles. He has photographed Al Pacino, Robert Dinero, Dennis Hopper, Marissa Miller, Kim Kardashian, Kanye West, Snoop Dogg, Floyd Mayweather, and Lance Armstrong amongst others. He has also produced shoots for internationally-acclaimed photographers such as Ellen von Unwerth for Sang Bleu and Luca Babini for GQ Italy.

In addition to shooting campaigns for companies including Cadillac, Nike and Rockford Fosgate and directing new media projects for My Cadillac Stories, MetroPCS, MTV and Apple, Estevan has designed album covers and/or directed music videos for artists including Eminem, Cypress Hill, Blink 182, Snoop Dogg and Xzibit.

Erin Mulvehill

My work aims to explore the human connections and subtle nuances that whisper into the ear of our every day. much of my work is rooted in the ideas of mind, body, seamlessness, and time. this is largely because my deepest beliefs lie in the principles of buddhism, the integration of art and life, and the preservation of beautiful moments. i am nomadic by nature and am inspired each day by the nothingness that resides in all things.

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Mark Seliger

 

 

Mark Seliger was born in Amarillo, Texas in 1959, where he lived with his parents, Maurice and Carol Lee, and his two older brothers and younger sister, until 1964, when they moved to Houston. Seliger’s early interest in photography began when his brother Frank promised to give him his Diana camera if he got a base hit in Little League. He didn’t get the hit, but he got on base (by getting a walk for getting hit in the shoulder with the ball), and the camera was his. His first love quickly became the darkroom where he began experimenting with printing and developing in the family’s bathroom. He attended Houston’s High School for Performing & Visual Arts and, from there, went on to attend East Texas State University, where his education began in earnest, as he studied the history of documentary photography. He moved to New York City in 1984. In 1987, he began shooting small assignments for Rolling Stone. He was signed as their Chief Photographer in 1992. During his time at Rolling Stone, Seliger shot over 125 covers and began a long term collaborative relationship with Design Director, Fred Woodward, which continued into their work with GQ. They have co-directed numerous music videos for artists such as Willie Nelson, Lenny Kravitz and Elvis Costello. In 2001, Seliger moved from Rolling Stone to Condé Nast. He shoots frequently for Vanity Fair, Elle, Italian Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue and German Vogue. In 2011, he co-founded a non-profit exhibition space for photography with Brent Langton called 401 Projects, which has featured shows for James Nachtwey, Eugene Richards, Albert Watson, Platon, among others. Seliger continues his love of the darkroom by using the platinum palladium process to create large-scale, 30”x40” prints, and his photographs have been exhibited in museums and galleries. He has published numerous books, including: On Christopher Street: Transgender Stories (Rizzoli, 2016), Listen (Rizzoli, 2010), Mark Seliger: The Music Book (teNeues, 2008), In My Stairwell (Rizzoli, 2005), Lenny Kravitz/Mark Seliger (Arena, 2001), Physiognomy (Bullfinch, 1999) and When They Came to Take My Father – Voices from the Holocaust (Arcade, 1996). Seliger is the recipient of such esteemed awards as: Alfred Eisenstaedt Award, Lucie Award, Clio Grand Prix, Cannes Lions Grand Prix, and ASME’s. In 2017, Seliger’s work became a part of the permanent collection of the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC.

 

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Marion Post Wolcott

Marion Post Wolcott was born in Montclair, New Jersey, and educated at the New School for Social Research, New York University, and at the University of Vienna. Upon graduation in 1932, she returned to New York to pursue a career in photography and attended workshops with Ralph Steiner. By 1936, she was a freelance photographer for Life, Fortune, and other magazines. She became a staff photographer for the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin in 1937 and remained there until Paul Strand recommended her to Roy Stryker at the Farm Security Administration, where she worked from 1938 to 1942. Wolcott suspended her photographic career thereafter in order to raise her family, but continued to photograph periodically as she traveled and taught, in Iran, Pakistan, Egypt, and New Mexico. In 1968 she returned to freelance photography in California and concentrated on color work, which she had been producing in the early 1940s. Wolcott’s photographs have been included in group and solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in 1962, ICP, and elsewhere. Among other honors she has received are the Dorothea Lange Award, and the 1991 Society of Photographic Education’s Lifetime Achievement Award. The several books on her life and career include Paul Henrickson’s Looking for the Light: The Hidden Life of Marion Post Wolcott (1992).

Wolcott’s documentary photographs for the FSA are notable for their variation in subject matter. Because she joined the organization late in its existence, Stryker often gave her assignments intended to complete projects already begun by others. Wolcott’s photographs show wealthy and middle-class subjects in addition to the poor people and migrant workers who appeared in most FSA photographs. Her body of work provides a view into another side of the 1930s in America, among that small percentage of people who could afford to escape the damaging effects of the Depression.

Rick Gallina

I have fallen in love with taking portraits. Taking portraits help me show you how I see these people, to express how I am feeling, and to tell my story.

I’m Rick. I’m a portrait photographer in Southern Colorado. I have worked in professional advertising sales, and am currently a photography teacher at the high school level. I have an undergrad in Mass Communications and an M.Ed. in Education. What does all of that even mean and how is it relevant? It means that at my core I truly enjoy working with people, whether it was with businesses developing comprehensive marketing strategies, with my students helping them develop their passion for art and creativity, or now working with amazing people helping them create visuals that they can cherish and be proud of. I believe this love for connecting with people shows itself in my work.

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Amanda Lucier

Amanda Lucier graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Reed College with a degree in Political Science and is finishing her Master’s degree in Photojournalism at the University of Missouri. Currently a staff photographer at the Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, VA, she interned at The Herald in Jasper, Ind., and the Dallas Morning News in Dallas, Tx. Amanda was twice a Rhodes Scholarship finalist, Runner-Up 2008 College Photographer of the Year, and was recently named Virginia News Photographer of the Year.

Lynn Geesaman

Born in Cleveland in 1938, Lynn Geesaman was introduced to photography while studying physics at Wellesley College. An interest in gardens led to research, travel and photography in England, France, Belgium, Italy and Germany. New to Geesaman’s work is her use of brilliant color. Through meticulous darkroom printing, we are confronted with glowing yellow trees, glistening orange foliage and soft green waters that challenge our perception of natures’ colors. Lynn Geesaman has exhibited widely in museums and galleries throughout the U.S. and Europe including Bibliothéque Nationale de France, Paris; The American Cultural Center, Brussels; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts; and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. She has received many honors including the Minnesota State Arts Board Fellowship and the Arts Midwest/NEA Regional Visual Arts Fellowship Award

Erez Sabag

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Lee Miller

 

Lee Miller first entered the world of photography in New York as a model to the great photographers of the day such as Edward STEICHEN, HOYNINGEN-HUENE and Arnold GENTHE.

In 1929 she went to Paris and worked with the well known Surrealist artist and photographer Man RAY, and succeeded in establishing her own studio. She became known as a portraitist and fashion photographer, but her most enduring body of work is that of her Surrealist images. She returned to New York in 1932, and again set up her own studio which ran for 2 years and was highly successful. It closed when she married a wealthy Egyptian businessman Aziz ELOUI BEY and went to live with him in Cairo, Egypt. She became fascinated by long range desert travel and photographed desert villages and ruins. During a visit to Paris in 1937 she met Roland PENROSE, the Surrealist artist who was to become her second husband, and travelled with him to Greece and Romania. In 1939 she left Egypt for London shortly before World War II broke out. She moved in with Roland PENROSE and defying orders from the US Embassy to return to America she took a job as a freelance photographer on Vogue.

In 1944 she became a correspondent accredited to the US Army, and teamed up with Time Life photographer David E. SCHERMAN. She followed the US troops overseas on D Day + 20. She was probably the only woman combat photo-journalist to cover the front line war in Europe and among her many exploits she witnessed the siege of St Malo, the Liberation of Paris, the fighting in Luxembourg and Alsace, the Russian/American link up at Torgau, the liberation of Buchenwald and Dachau. She billeted in both Hitler and Eva Brauns houses in Munich, and photographed Hitlers house Wachenfeld at Berchtesgaden in flames on the eve of Germanys surrender. Penetrating deep into Eastern Europe, she covered harrowing scenes of children dying in Vienna, peasant life in post war Hungary and finally the execution of Prime Minister Lazlo Bardossy.

After the war she continued to contribute to Vogue for a further 2 years, covering fashion and celebrities. In 1947 she married Roland PENROSE and contributed to his biographies of PICASSO, MIRÓ, Man RAY and TÀPIES. Some of her portraits of famous artists like PICASSO are the most powerful portraits of the individuals ever produced, but it is mainly for the witty Surrealist images which permeate all her work that she is best remembered.

Mark Citret

Mark Citret was born in 1949 in Buffalo, New York, and grew up in San Francisco. He began photographing seriously in 1968, and received both his BA and MA in Art from San Francisco State University.

Most of Citret’s work is not specific to any locale or subject matter. Still, he has worked on many photographic projects over the course of his career, and continues to do so. From 1973 to 1975 he lived in and photographed Halcott Center, a farming valley in New York’s Catskill Mountains. In the mid to late 1980s he produced a large body of work with the working title of “Unnatural Wonders”, which is his personal survey of architecture in the national parks. He spent four years, 1990 to 1993, photographing a massive construction site in the southwest corner of San Francisco.

Since he moved to his current home in 1986, he has been photographing the ever changing play of ocean and sky from the cliff behind his house. Currently he is in the midst of a multi-year commission from the University of California San Francisco, photographing the construction of their 43 acre Mission Bay life-sciences campus.

Lori Vrba

I was raised in a small, back-woods Southeast Texas town.  I did not grow up with an exposure to art.  I did not have an uncle with a darkroom.  I didn’t really hold a camera until I was a grown woman.  I am a self-taught artist committed to film and the traditional wet darkroom.  I work intuitively in every creative element of my medium with an acute awareness of what and who has come before me.  My life experiences have brought me to this place where I find myself overwhelmed with the drive to make photographs about who I am…what moves me, what I feel inside, what I believe to be sacred and enduring.  I make pictures to challenge, calm, excite and satisfy my mind and heart.  I share my work in hopes of leaving some permanent, telling mark on the world…that I Was Here.

Alan Hunter

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Alan Hunter (b. 1985) is a Seattle-based photographer, artist, and carpenter. He enjoys building and destroying, road trips, chopping wood, winter, black coffee, the forest, heavy metal, mutts, hops, and tacos.

David Doubilet

David Doubilet is a well known underwater photographer known primarily for his work published in National Geographic Magazine. He was born in New York and started taking photos underwater at the young age of 12. He started with a Brownie Hawkeye in a rubber anesthesiologist’s bag to keep the water out of the camera. During his summer holidays, he spent his time along the New Jersey coast. He later worked as a diver and photographer for the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratories in New Jersey. He also spent much time in the Caribbean. While a dive instructor in the Bahamas he found his motivation to capture the beauty of the sea and everything in it.

His goal is to “redefine photographic boundaries” every time he enters the water. This has helped him achieve some of his greatest shots. In order to capture all the underwater wildlife, he takes several cameras with him on each of his trips. The main obstacle in underwater photography is the impossibility of changing lenses or film underwater.

Doubilet’s ingenuity lead him to the invention of the split lens camera. This allowed him to take pictures above and below water simultaneously. This worked by having a separate focus point on the top half and bottom half of the scene. When the picture is taken, it is recorded onto the same negative.

He has shot well over sixty stories for National Geographic and published numerous books on his own. His most recent was a photo shot in Cuban waters entitled “The Last Caribbean Refuge.

James Whitlow Delano

I’ve always been strongly affected by the environment, since I was a young child living beside a nuclear research lab in California. It was not outside of town but in it. Sometimes we’d hear, and feel, open-air explosions, some of which, I would learn later, contained depleted uranium. It was the height of the Cold War and people did not ask many questions then. At 7, we moved to the industrial New York City metropolitan area. Industrial contamination was so close to our leafy neighborhood, the wind sometimes carried fumes from refineries shattering our Rockwellian pretensions. Early on, I hatched a plan to move back westward away from the city to where there were mountains and forests; to the Rockies, then California again before landing in Tokyo. Naturally, I suppose, I became a documentary storyteller and a collector of visual evidence from my base in Asia for the past 2 decades. The documentary work focuses on humanity’s relationship with the environment and the ecological consequences of rapid development in East Asia, including violations of indigenous land and human rights. On the street, an “out of the corner of the eye” immediacy drives the work to peer beneath the surface at what is unspoken.

The work has been published and exhibited throughout the world and led to four monograph photo books, the first being “Empire: Impressions from China” and the latest on the “Black Tsunami: Japan 2011” on the epoch-changing triple disaster in Japan. Projects have been cited with the Alfred Eisenstadt Award (from Columbia University and Life Magazine), Leica’s Oskar Barnack, Picture of the Year International, NPPA Best of Photojournalism, PDN and others for work from China, Japan, Afghanistan and Burma (Myanmar), etc. In 2015, I founded EverydayClimateChange (ECC) Instagram feed, where photographers from 6 continents document global climate change on 7 continents. ECC bears witness that climate change is not happening “over there” but it is also happening right here and right now. ECC is not a western view on climate change because photographers come from the north, the south; the east and the west; and are as diverse as the cultures in which we were all raised.

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Ezra Stoller

Ezra Stoller is known as one of the most influential photographers of Modern architecture. He created iconic images of mid-Century buildings that help define the cultural memory of structures such as the Saarinen’s TWA Terminal, Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum. Of Stoller’s work, architecture critic Paul Goldberger once noted, “…his work has made him perhaps the most celebrated architectural photographer of the 20th Century; his pictures…have in and of themselves played a major role in shaping the public’s perception of what modern architecture is about.”

Ezra Stoller was born in Chicago in 1915 and graduated from New York University in 1938 with a degree in Industrial Design. As part of his war service, he worked with Paul Strand at the Office for Emergency Management and at the Signal Corps Photo Center. In 1961, Stoller was awarded the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal. His photographs have been exhibited internationally and are in numerous museum collections, including The Whitney Museum of American Art; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Canadian Centre for Architecture; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.