Rick Gallina

I have fallen in love with taking portraits. Taking portraits help me show you how I see these people, to express how I am feeling, and to tell my story.

I’m Rick. I’m a portrait photographer in Southern Colorado. I have worked in professional advertising sales, and am currently a photography teacher at the high school level. I have an undergrad in Mass Communications and an M.Ed. in Education. What does all of that even mean and how is it relevant? It means that at my core I truly enjoy working with people, whether it was with businesses developing comprehensive marketing strategies, with my students helping them develop their passion for art and creativity, or now working with amazing people helping them create visuals that they can cherish and be proud of. I believe this love for connecting with people shows itself in my work.

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Amanda Lucier

Amanda Lucier graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Reed College with a degree in Political Science and is finishing her Master’s degree in Photojournalism at the University of Missouri. Currently a staff photographer at the Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, VA, she interned at The Herald in Jasper, Ind., and the Dallas Morning News in Dallas, Tx. Amanda was twice a Rhodes Scholarship finalist, Runner-Up 2008 College Photographer of the Year, and was recently named Virginia News Photographer of the Year.

Lynn Geesaman

Born in Cleveland in 1938, Lynn Geesaman was introduced to photography while studying physics at Wellesley College. An interest in gardens led to research, travel and photography in England, France, Belgium, Italy and Germany. New to Geesaman’s work is her use of brilliant color. Through meticulous darkroom printing, we are confronted with glowing yellow trees, glistening orange foliage and soft green waters that challenge our perception of natures’ colors. Lynn Geesaman has exhibited widely in museums and galleries throughout the U.S. and Europe including Bibliothéque Nationale de France, Paris; The American Cultural Center, Brussels; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts; and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. She has received many honors including the Minnesota State Arts Board Fellowship and the Arts Midwest/NEA Regional Visual Arts Fellowship Award

Erez Sabag

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Lee Miller

 

Lee Miller first entered the world of photography in New York as a model to the great photographers of the day such as Edward STEICHEN, HOYNINGEN-HUENE and Arnold GENTHE.

In 1929 she went to Paris and worked with the well known Surrealist artist and photographer Man RAY, and succeeded in establishing her own studio. She became known as a portraitist and fashion photographer, but her most enduring body of work is that of her Surrealist images. She returned to New York in 1932, and again set up her own studio which ran for 2 years and was highly successful. It closed when she married a wealthy Egyptian businessman Aziz ELOUI BEY and went to live with him in Cairo, Egypt. She became fascinated by long range desert travel and photographed desert villages and ruins. During a visit to Paris in 1937 she met Roland PENROSE, the Surrealist artist who was to become her second husband, and travelled with him to Greece and Romania. In 1939 she left Egypt for London shortly before World War II broke out. She moved in with Roland PENROSE and defying orders from the US Embassy to return to America she took a job as a freelance photographer on Vogue.

In 1944 she became a correspondent accredited to the US Army, and teamed up with Time Life photographer David E. SCHERMAN. She followed the US troops overseas on D Day + 20. She was probably the only woman combat photo-journalist to cover the front line war in Europe and among her many exploits she witnessed the siege of St Malo, the Liberation of Paris, the fighting in Luxembourg and Alsace, the Russian/American link up at Torgau, the liberation of Buchenwald and Dachau. She billeted in both Hitler and Eva Brauns houses in Munich, and photographed Hitlers house Wachenfeld at Berchtesgaden in flames on the eve of Germanys surrender. Penetrating deep into Eastern Europe, she covered harrowing scenes of children dying in Vienna, peasant life in post war Hungary and finally the execution of Prime Minister Lazlo Bardossy.

After the war she continued to contribute to Vogue for a further 2 years, covering fashion and celebrities. In 1947 she married Roland PENROSE and contributed to his biographies of PICASSO, MIRÓ, Man RAY and TÀPIES. Some of her portraits of famous artists like PICASSO are the most powerful portraits of the individuals ever produced, but it is mainly for the witty Surrealist images which permeate all her work that she is best remembered.

Mark Citret

Mark Citret was born in 1949 in Buffalo, New York, and grew up in San Francisco. He began photographing seriously in 1968, and received both his BA and MA in Art from San Francisco State University.

Most of Citret’s work is not specific to any locale or subject matter. Still, he has worked on many photographic projects over the course of his career, and continues to do so. From 1973 to 1975 he lived in and photographed Halcott Center, a farming valley in New York’s Catskill Mountains. In the mid to late 1980s he produced a large body of work with the working title of “Unnatural Wonders”, which is his personal survey of architecture in the national parks. He spent four years, 1990 to 1993, photographing a massive construction site in the southwest corner of San Francisco.

Since he moved to his current home in 1986, he has been photographing the ever changing play of ocean and sky from the cliff behind his house. Currently he is in the midst of a multi-year commission from the University of California San Francisco, photographing the construction of their 43 acre Mission Bay life-sciences campus.

Lori Vrba

I was raised in a small, back-woods Southeast Texas town.  I did not grow up with an exposure to art.  I did not have an uncle with a darkroom.  I didn’t really hold a camera until I was a grown woman.  I am a self-taught artist committed to film and the traditional wet darkroom.  I work intuitively in every creative element of my medium with an acute awareness of what and who has come before me.  My life experiences have brought me to this place where I find myself overwhelmed with the drive to make photographs about who I am…what moves me, what I feel inside, what I believe to be sacred and enduring.  I make pictures to challenge, calm, excite and satisfy my mind and heart.  I share my work in hopes of leaving some permanent, telling mark on the world…that I Was Here.

Alan Hunter

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Alan Hunter (b. 1985) is a Seattle-based photographer, artist, and carpenter. He enjoys building and destroying, road trips, chopping wood, winter, black coffee, the forest, heavy metal, mutts, hops, and tacos.

David Doubilet

David Doubilet is a well known underwater photographer known primarily for his work published in National Geographic Magazine. He was born in New York and started taking photos underwater at the young age of 12. He started with a Brownie Hawkeye in a rubber anesthesiologist’s bag to keep the water out of the camera. During his summer holidays, he spent his time along the New Jersey coast. He later worked as a diver and photographer for the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratories in New Jersey. He also spent much time in the Caribbean. While a dive instructor in the Bahamas he found his motivation to capture the beauty of the sea and everything in it.

His goal is to “redefine photographic boundaries” every time he enters the water. This has helped him achieve some of his greatest shots. In order to capture all the underwater wildlife, he takes several cameras with him on each of his trips. The main obstacle in underwater photography is the impossibility of changing lenses or film underwater.

Doubilet’s ingenuity lead him to the invention of the split lens camera. This allowed him to take pictures above and below water simultaneously. This worked by having a separate focus point on the top half and bottom half of the scene. When the picture is taken, it is recorded onto the same negative.

He has shot well over sixty stories for National Geographic and published numerous books on his own. His most recent was a photo shot in Cuban waters entitled “The Last Caribbean Refuge.

James Whitlow Delano

I’ve always been strongly affected by the environment, since I was a young child living beside a nuclear research lab in California. It was not outside of town but in it. Sometimes we’d hear, and feel, open-air explosions, some of which, I would learn later, contained depleted uranium. It was the height of the Cold War and people did not ask many questions then. At 7, we moved to the industrial New York City metropolitan area. Industrial contamination was so close to our leafy neighborhood, the wind sometimes carried fumes from refineries shattering our Rockwellian pretensions. Early on, I hatched a plan to move back westward away from the city to where there were mountains and forests; to the Rockies, then California again before landing in Tokyo. Naturally, I suppose, I became a documentary storyteller and a collector of visual evidence from my base in Asia for the past 2 decades. The documentary work focuses on humanity’s relationship with the environment and the ecological consequences of rapid development in East Asia, including violations of indigenous land and human rights. On the street, an “out of the corner of the eye” immediacy drives the work to peer beneath the surface at what is unspoken.

The work has been published and exhibited throughout the world and led to four monograph photo books, the first being “Empire: Impressions from China” and the latest on the “Black Tsunami: Japan 2011” on the epoch-changing triple disaster in Japan. Projects have been cited with the Alfred Eisenstadt Award (from Columbia University and Life Magazine), Leica’s Oskar Barnack, Picture of the Year International, NPPA Best of Photojournalism, PDN and others for work from China, Japan, Afghanistan and Burma (Myanmar), etc. In 2015, I founded EverydayClimateChange (ECC) Instagram feed, where photographers from 6 continents document global climate change on 7 continents. ECC bears witness that climate change is not happening “over there” but it is also happening right here and right now. ECC is not a western view on climate change because photographers come from the north, the south; the east and the west; and are as diverse as the cultures in which we were all raised.

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Ezra Stoller

Ezra Stoller is known as one of the most influential photographers of Modern architecture. He created iconic images of mid-Century buildings that help define the cultural memory of structures such as the Saarinen’s TWA Terminal, Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum. Of Stoller’s work, architecture critic Paul Goldberger once noted, “…his work has made him perhaps the most celebrated architectural photographer of the 20th Century; his pictures…have in and of themselves played a major role in shaping the public’s perception of what modern architecture is about.”

Ezra Stoller was born in Chicago in 1915 and graduated from New York University in 1938 with a degree in Industrial Design. As part of his war service, he worked with Paul Strand at the Office for Emergency Management and at the Signal Corps Photo Center. In 1961, Stoller was awarded the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal. His photographs have been exhibited internationally and are in numerous museum collections, including The Whitney Museum of American Art; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Canadian Centre for Architecture; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Doug Rickard

Rickard’s work evokes a connection to the tradition of American street photography, with knowing references to Walker Evans, Robert Frank and Stephen Shore. He both follows and advances that tradition, with a documentary strategy that acknowledges an increasingly technological world—a world in which a camera mounted on a moving car can generate evidence of the people and places it is leaving behind. Collectively, these images present a photographic portrait of the socially disenfranchised and economically powerless, those living an inversion of the American Dream.
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Donna Ferrato

Donna Ferrato is an internationally-known documentary photographer. Her gifts for exploration, illumination, and documentation coupled with a commitment to revealing the darker sides of humanity, have made her a giant in the medium. She has four books including Living with the Enemy which sold over 40,000 copies, and Love & Lust, published by Aperture. She has participated in over 500 one-woman shows and has received awards such as the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanistic Photography (1987), the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism (2003), and the Gender Fairness Award from the New York State Supreme Court Judges (2009). She founded a non-profit called Domestic Abuse Awareness for over a decade and in 2014 launched a campaign called I Am Unbeatable, which features women who have left their abusers. In November 2016, TIME magazine announced her photograph of a woman being hit by her husband (1982) as one of the “100 Most Influential Photographs of All Time.” Currently, Ferrato is documenting her rapidly-changing New York neighborhood of Tribeca for a new book, and leads experimental photo workshops called The Erotic Eye.

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Harold Eugene Edgerton

 

 

 

 

 

Harold Eugene Edgerton, born in Fremont, Nebraska, on April 6, 1903, was the inventor of stroboscopic photography. Beginning in 1921, he studied electric engineering at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, later at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. There he worked as an assistant in 1927 and from 1928-68 as a professor. Edgerton’s uncle taught him the basics of photography when he was 15.

Amber Rose Ortolano

Born in Honolulu, Hawaii, Amber has traveled across the United States throughout most of her childhood. At 16, she has been featured in and interviewed for numerous magazines and websites.

“I hope people see themselves. Each one of my photos is a small moment, and they will all add up to one life, and I really hope people see that; it’s not just about being beautiful or pleasing to the eye, I want people to experience a rush of feelings, as if their whole life is flashing before them.”

Amber currently lives in New York.

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Ami Vitale

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In the beginning, photography was my passport to meeting people, learning, and experiencing new cultures. Now it is more than just a passport. It’s a tool for creating awareness and understanding across cultures, communities, and countries; a tool to make sense of our commonalities in the world we share.

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Nicholas Nixon




Nicholas Nixon, born in 1947, is known for the ease and intimacy of his black and white large format photography. Nixon has photographed porch life in the rural south, schools in and around Boston, cityscapes, sick and dying people, the intimacy of couples, and the ongoing annual portrait of his wife, Bebe, and her three sisters (which he began in 1975). Recording his subjects close and with meticulous detail facilitates the connection between the viewer and the subject. Nixon has been awarded three National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and two Guggenheim Fellowships. In 2014, Nixon’s annual portrait series, The Brown Sisters, reached its 40th anniversary and was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art. In Summer 2013 Nixon’s book Close Far was released by Steidl. The body of work explores the relationship of the self in physical and psychological proximity to the urban landscape. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston exhibited Nicholas Nixon: Family Album, through May 2011. In 2006, Nixon’s ongoing portrait of the Brown sisters was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas. In 2005 Nixon had a solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and the Cincinnati Art Museum. Nixon’s work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, among many others.

 

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Wayne F. Miller

 

 

 

 

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Wayne F. Miller (September 19, 1918 – May 22, 2013) was an American photographer known for his series of photographs The Way of Life of the Northern Negro. Active as a photographer from 1942 until 1975, he was a contributor to Magnum Photos beginning in 1958.

David Guttenfelder

David Guttenfelder is a National Geographic Photographer focusing on geopolitical conflict, conservation and culture.

Guttenfelder has spent more than 20 years as a photojournalist and documentary photographer based in Nairobi, Abidjan, New Delhi, Jerusalem and Tokyo covering world events in nearly 100 countries. In 2011, he helped open a bureau in North Korea for the AP, the first western news agency to have an office in the otherwise-isolated country. Guttenfelder has made more than 40 trips to North Korea.

Guttenfelder is a eight-time World Press Photo Award winner and a seven-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is the 2013 ICP Infinity Prize winner for photojournalism and a winner of the Overseas Press Club of America John Faber, Olivier Rebbot, & Feature Photography awards. Pictures of the Year International and the NPPA have named him Photojournalist of the Year. In 2016, a photograph of his made in North Korea was named among TIME Magazine’s “100 Most Influential Photographs Ever Taken”.

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Steven Lyon

Steven Lyon is an artist hailing from the beaches of California.. For over three decades, Steven has engineered a creative legacy both in front of and behind the camera. The start of his career saw Lyon as the face for designers such as Gianni Versace, Claude Montana, Jean Paul Gaultier, Cerruti, and Trussardi .

He bought his first camera in 1998 and moved to Paris to re-immerse himself in the Paris fashion world, this time behind the lens. Using film as his medium and drawing inspiration from cinema and the iconic photographers of the ‘80’s, he developed his own signature style and established himself as an irreverent, borderline rebel in today’s homogenized fashion world. He quickly developed a rich, intimate and cinematic aesthetic and contributed to publications such as Vanity Fairy, GQ, Vogue, S Magazine, Treats and 25, amongst many others. His work has been exhibited in numerous galleries worldwide.

In 2012, Steven founded a registered 501c3 nonprofit organization called Lyonheartlove. For the past 3 years, Lyon has been filming a full-length feature documentary in Africa called,
“Something that Matters.” The documentary takes a raw, first-hand look at the escalating crisis of poaching and corruption, which threatens extinction to the entire Rhino species. “Something that Matters” is the inaugural project under the auspices of Lyonheartlove. Lyon is also currently at work on producing and directing a book and documentary called, “Kings of the Catwalk: Project 80’s” – a project highlighting the top male models of the 80’s and how HIV effected their lives and changed the industry at its most glamorous time in history. This marks another project under the Lyonheartlove banner. Proceeds from the book will go to AIDS research.

Lyon’s directorial work has been noticed by a variety of international film festivals. His music video “Fire” for the band The Winery Dogs was the official selection for both “New York Film Week”, “The Mexico International Fashion Film Festival”and the “Los Angeles International Film Festival.” It garnered top prize in “Hollywood International Motion Picture Film Festival.” His sultry sexy short film “Remember Cuba” has recently been selected for the “Los Angeles CineFest.”

Steven currently resides in NYC and Paris with his legendary, man’s best friend – Rudy.

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