Schilte & Portielje,

Schilte & Portielje, who live and work in Rotterdam, are primarily known for their photography of series of unusual and very recognizable figurines. They display an intricate way of playing with and relating to each other: fantastic poetic, dreamlike figures who abduct the spectator into the artists world of wonders and miracles. The figures approach in the middle of a nondescript, plain, undefined room. They offer frontal and back views and grotesquely contorted bodies. They wear costumes adorned with veils and lace, corsages and garters, jewelry, neckties and collars, transparent fabrics and body hugging clothes. All these accessories create different characters in this theatric role play. The game lives of abstraction. How do huge feet go with a delicate body? Which intricacies are woven into the mesh of physical abnormalities? How do these bodies relate to the pieces of furniture that have been added to the decor for the characters to hold onto or lean against? It is the full intention of the artists not to give a satisfactory answer to these questions, they willingly create confusion and force the spectator to focus more intensely.

During recent years, the artists perfected their mise en scene. “Photoworks beyond reality” emphasizes surprising moments in surrealist, erotically charged moments. This creates a scrapbook full of subtle hints and uncertain role play. We can never see the full faces of Schilte & Portielje‘s figurines, mouth and nose are rarely recognizable, the entire head is mostly covered by eclectic hats, fabrics, hairdos or the entire face is headed another way.
Subtle eroticism, demanding poses or the quiet poetry of desire are the elements used in this dark world rich in contrast. Most of the time, female characters appear in his series. „Our work deals with the fundamental aspects of human existence, male or female alike. Sexual identity is not our subject, but ambiguity is important for us because it creates room for interpretation and identification,” say the artists.

Huub Schilte and Jacqueline Portielje collaborate since 1997 under the name Schilte & Portielje. „We prefer to work in absence of a preset theme or subject. We chose fragments of images from our own digital library, and then proceed independently to determine how the chosen fragment could fit into the concept of the new work. Frequently, we exchange the works so that one continues where the other stopped.”

Sometimes their work reminds the viewer of the sought-after Carte de Visite images, in fashion during the second half of the 19th century. However, the subjects of Schilte & Portielje are extremely timely. Their forms and design with historical patterns – like the consistent use of black-and-white photography reference analog role models. But the photographers use a well developed digital collage technique to achieve their trademark figurine, very much anchored in the present. „Most importantly, we look at our work settled somewhere between photography and painting. We love contrast between computer techniques and the slightly nostalgic charm of black-and white photography that enables us to increase the distance between art and reality.” The presentation of their work also resembles the classical medium of photography. By framing their work in historical fashion and protecting the surface with shellac they give their prints the aura of uniqueness, strongly resembling paintings.

Aart Klein

 

1

2

3

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aart Klein’s career as a photographer began in 1930 with the photo press agency Polygoon. Although he was working there initially as an office clerk, he also started doing some photography himself. During his nine years at Polygoon’s, Aart Klein grew into one of the agency’s foremost photographers. Unfortunately, the negatives of the photographs he made in that period have been lost. During the German occupation, Aart Klein held a number of small jobs as a photographer. In 1943, he was forced to do labour in Germany, where he continued working as a photographer. After a year, he obtained leave, and when he got back to the Netherlands he went into hiding. During the last year of the German occupation, Aart Klein worked for the resistance and his photographs were passed on to England.

After Holland’s liberation in 1945, he set up the photographers’ cooperative agency Particam with Maria Austria, Henk Jonker and Wim Zilver Rupe . The agency specialized in ballet, theatre and cabaret, and owed its monopoly in the field partly to the method Aart Klein and Maria Austria had developed to increase the sensitivity of slow films, so that there was no more need to use a flash during performances.

In 1956, Aart Klein left Particam and set up as freelance photographer. From that time on, he worked regularly for the quality paper Algemeen Handelsblad and was commissioned to produce a great number of photography books.

Infrastructure, urbanization, water and landscape are the thread that runs through Aart Klein’s whole oeuvre. In 1999, he explained the fascination these subjects held for him: ‘I really grew up with the idea of ‘the Netherlands rising’. Industry, the Delta Works and ports are subjects that strongly appeal to me.’ In contrast to many other photographers of his generation, people play a minor part in Aart Klein’s work and he developed his own vision on landscape photography.

He once said: ‘My photography is called black-and-white photography, but in fact it is just the other way round: white on black. Because if you don’t do anything, you get a black image. It’s only when you open the shutter that something happens: then you draw in white.’ The strong black-white contrasts originate from the period when Aart Klein participated in the cooperative photographer’s agency. Together with Maria Austria he devised a method of taking photographs in a theatre without having to use a flash. The negatives were ‘pushed’ in a well heated developer to achieve strong black-and-white contrasts. A major part of the artistic process took place while printing the negatives. In the dark room, Aart Klein determined quite precisely how he wished an image to be cropped.

The way he worked was often characterized as graphic; he thought this to be ‘a rather superficial characterization that ignored the content’. Just as many other socially committed photographers, Aart Klein was a member of the photography branch of the Gebonden Kunsten federatie GKf (Bound Arts Federation) and was a co-founder of the Nederlandse Vereniging van Fotojournalisten (Dutch Association of Press Photographers). Although his work has been associated with ‘subjective photography’, that trend is more a confirmation of what he was already doing than a source of inspiration. He never joined the more aesthetically oriented Nederlandse Fotografen Kunstkring (Dutch Photographers Art Society).

In 1986, the Museum for Modern Art De Beyerd in Breda organized a retrospective. On that occasion, a boxed set containing two portfolios with unknown work by Aart Klein made its appearance. In 1982, Aart Klein received the Capi-Lux Alblas Prize and in 1996, the Fonds voor Beeldende Kunsten, Vormgeving en Bouwkunst (Foundation for the Visual Arts, Design and Architecture) awarded him the photography prize for his entire oeuvre.

 

 

Lida Chaulet

A Dutch photographer having lived in the Netherlands for most of her life, while travelling abroad, from time to time. At age 10, she received her first camera as a first prize, resulting she carried her camera everywhere, becoming professional some years later.

She studied chemistry, math, computer sciences and programming languages. Her career has encompassed: chemical analyst, technical support engineer and as manager of an international computer help-desk. Recently she commenced a senior position for the Publicity & Promotion of a Lighting firm.

In 2004 she was asked for a few photography projects and this made her decide to study photography at the Fotovakschool in Apeldoorn (NL), specializing in Portrait and Fashion.

Horst P. Horst, Ruth Bernard, Jeanloup Sieff, Elliott Erwitt, André Kertész, Herb Ritts, and Robert Doisneau, amongst others, have influenced her professional views.

2007 was her start for capturing nudes, working with light to emphasize the beauty of the human form.

Home

Caspar Claasen

I’m a photographer based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. I am fascinated by extraordinary interactions between people, often individuals, and their everyday surroundings.

How an apparently everyday moment can become a short story when photographed.

How a non–scripted moment can appear so surreal, meaningful, esthetic or humorous that it looks scripted. But it isn’t.

I am thrilled when I succeed in doing this.

Home

Lida Chaulet

A Dutch photographer having lived in the Netherlands for most of her life, while travelling abroad, from time to time. At age 10, she received her first camera as a first prize, resulting she carried her camera everywhere, becoming professional some years later.

She studied chemistry, math, computer sciences and programming languages. Her career has encompassed: chemical analyst, technical support engineer and as manager of an international computer help-desk. Recently she commenced a senior position for the Publicity & Promotion of a Lighting firm.

In 2004 she was asked for a few photography projects and this made her decide to study photography at the Fotovakschool in Apeldoorn (NL), specializing in Portrait and Fashion.

Horst P. Horst, Ruth Bernard, Jeanloup Sieff, Elliott Erwitt, André Kertész, Herb Ritts, and Robert Doisneau, amongst others, have influenced her professional views.

Home

Laura Hospes

Laura Hospes (1994) has been capturing her own self with the camera since the tender age of 16, out of a need to connect with people. This need has not waned over the years; it has only become more necessary. Hospes’ self portraits are her way of making clear what is inside of her. Her camera consoles and understands her better than anyone else. Photography is her medium to accept and process the many struggles in her life. The resulting images are intense and arresting, as well as being a captivating glimpse inside the world of a young woman dealing with depression and anxiety.

Hospes was named one of the 50 best emerging photographers of 2015 by the international jury for the Lensculture Emerging Talent Awards. Her work has been frequently featured both home and abroad.

Guardar

Danielle van Zadelhoff

Home

Anne Barlinckhoff

 

Home

Ed van der Elsken

 


Ed van der Elsken was born in Amsterdam in 1925. He lives and works in Paris from 1950 to 1954. In this period, he lives with Ata Kando and her 3 children.
He moves back to Amsterdam and lives there from 1954 to 1971. He travels a lot for his work, for instance to Bagara, Central Africa in 1957, and makes a long world trip in1959 and 1960 with Gerda van der Veen, his second wife.Shortly after, they have two children Tinelou and Daan. During his many travels, he makes reports in colour for the monthly magazine Avenue.
From 1971, he lives in the country near Edam. In this period, he often travels to Japan and also works in Amsterdam. He is living with Anneke Hilhorst and they have a son named John. In 1988 he is diagnosed with cancer. He dies in 1990.

Ed van der Elsken (1925-1990) – the ‘enfant terrible’ of Dutch photography – was a talented photographer and filmmaker who expressed his meetings with people in photos, photo books and films for more than 40 years. Strolling through cities such as Paris, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Amsterdam or travelling through Africa and Japan, he preferably took photographs of striking individuals with character. His first photo book was published in 1956 Love on the left bank, which instantly made him world-famous. Some twenty photo books followed. He also made several television films, mostly about subjects regarding his own life.

Claire Droppert

My name is Claire Droppert and I’m a freelance photographer and graphic designer based in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

I have lived by the coast for the majority of my life. I’ve been inspired by the wide open expanse of coastlines, together with the more traditional features of the inland landscapes. Throughout I consistently focus and combine both simplicity and minimalism to achieve a dreamy artistic approach to my photography.

My photographic preference is for landscapes and desolate / open spaces. The locations allow myself to subtly maintain a unique and silent feel to my work. Within my Silence series I continually strive to incorporate a strong vision, modern editing techniques, soft tones and smooth lines in an inspiring and appealing way. I also try to engage with the world around me by incorporating my vision, thoughts and ideas into modern urban architecture.

My work has been exhibited in New York, Brussels and Rotterdam. More of my images have appeared in publications including Discovery magazine, Instaphotographers Annual, Photo digitaal magazine, HP de Tijd, Algemeen dagblad and Get inspired magazine.

Media outlets that have also featured my photography are The Huffington Post, Wired, ABC News,Lightroom, Gizmodo, This is Colossal, Visual News, Cult of Mac, Fastcodesign, Design You Trust, Fubiz, Crispme, Bloginity, The Blaze and Photographyblogger, along with many more national and international art, design, and news websites.

Hellen van Meene

Hellen van Meene (Alkmaar, Netherlands, 1972) is known for her (mostly) square photographic portraits of teenage girls. Her work was first exhibited in 1996 and has been shown around the world since then. Her photos are in the collection of many prominent museums, including Guggenheim NYC and MoMA. She lives and works in Heiloo and her subjects now include boys, still lifes, dogs and other animals.

Bertien van Manen

1-prometeo1

Home

Cornelie Tollens

índice

 

6d986d1b315aabcf939fd7115bcc3c44

H o m e

Edwin Giesbers

Edwin Giesbers is a professional freelance nature photographer who lives in Nijmegen (the Netherlands).
Already during early childhood he has been exploring nature in his own residential environment. Already at the age of 16 he started combining his love for nature with photography. Since 2005 Edwin is a dedicated fulltime nature photographer.

Edwin creates complet stories (pictures and text) for several magazines. Articles has been published in renowned magazines such as BBC Wildlife Magazine, National Geographic, Terre Sauvage and Camera Natura. In 2011 he was commissioned by National Geographic and Dutch Media to produce a book on nature photography in the Netherlands and Belgium. In the Netherlands, Edwin is commissioned by magazines such as Roots magazine and National Geographic Magazine.

Worldwide his pictures have been awarded in several leading international photo competitions. Including multiple first prices at the European Nature Photographer of the Year and Natures Best contest. Examples can be found at the award page.

His work is represented bij Nature Picture Library (England), an international leading photo agency which has a partnership with Minden Pictures (US). Since 2009 Edwin has joined IEPA (International Environment Photographers Association). He also supports the work of Orangutan Outreach Netherlands with images and presentations.

In the beginning of the year 2014 Edwin started his project “Frogs Life Project” which aims to draw attention to endangered amphibians. Through photo stories in magazines, exhibitions and a book about frogs Edwin hopes to spread knowledge about amphibians. A fixed percentage of the nett sales is going to organizations that are commited to protect amphibians and also do research on the diseases that threaten the amphibians. More about this project: http://www.frogs-life.com

Edwin says:
People ask me quite often why I became a professional nature photographer. What else? Already as a young boy I explored the beauty of nature around my home. I could found often on my knees crawling throug the field where I had exciting encounters with strange-looking insects and friendly croaking frogs. There is nothing more beautiful than that! Nowadays nature photography is still an excuse for me to crawl around in a field with beautiful flowers and small animals. Just like in my early childhood, but now with a camera in my hands.

Ed van der Elsken

 

Ed van der Elsken was born in Amsterdam in 1925. He lives and works in Paris from 1950 to 1954. In this period, he lives with Ata Kando and her 3 children.
He moves back to Amsterdam and lives there from 1954 to 1971. He travels a lot for his work, for instance to Bagara, Central Africa in 1957, and makes a long world trip in1959 and 1960 with Gerda van der Veen, his second wife.Shortly after, they have two children Tinelou and Daan. During his many travels, he makes reports in colour for the monthly magazine Avenue.
From 1971, he lives in the country near Edam. In this period, he often travels to Japan and also works in Amsterdam. He is living with Anneke Hilhorst and they have a son named John. In 1998 he is diagnosed with cancer. He dies in 1990.

Ed van der Elsken (1925-1990) – the ‘enfant terrible’ of Dutch photography – was a talented photographer and filmmaker who expressed his meetings with people in photos, photo books and films for more than 40 years. Strolling through cities such as Paris, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Amsterdam or travelling through Africa and Japan, he preferably took photographs of striking individuals with character. His first photo book was published in 1956 Love on the left bank, which instantly made him world-famous. Some twenty photo books followed. He also made several television films, mostly about subjects regarding his own life.

Anton Corbijn

1

1

H o m e

Erwin Olaf

1

2

3

4

 

 

 

 

 

5

6

Born in 1959 in Hilversum (the Netherlands), lives in Amsterdam (the Netherlands).

Erwin Olaf’s art implicitly visualises the unspoken, the overlooked, that which typically resists easy documentation. Olaf’s trademark is to address social issues, taboos and bourgeois conventions within the framework of a highly stylised and cunning mode of imagery. With the aid of his razor-sharp aesthetic intuition, Olaf purposely conceals his themes so that the viewer unconsciously and initially accepts the concealment found in his photo series. Yet in the end, his unconventional style never fails to deliver dramatic visual and emotional impact. By providing scenic and striking design, along with the utmost perfect composition in his typical, immaculate ‘OWN’ style, combined with his passion for conceiving flawless scenarios, he vividly captures the essence of contemporary life.

Mixing photojournalism with studio photography, Olaf emerged on the international art scene in 1988, when his series Chessmen was awarded the first prize in the Young European Photographer competition. This award was followed by an exhibition at the Ludwig Museum in Cologne, Germany in the same year. In his earlier work on the subject of social exclusion Olaf was deliberately disturbing with the intention of raising awareness and he was dedicated towards exploring issues of class, race, sexual taste, beliefs, habits and grace. In the series Rain (2004), Hope (2005), Grief (2007) and Fall (2008) Olaf challenges the notion of domestic bliss. Dusk (2009) and Dawn (2010) show how culture can become repression, despite a beautiful appearance. A similar disengagement takes place in Olaf’s Hotel (2010) series in which he explores the subtle range of detached melancholic emotions in dimly-lit exquisitely furnished timeless hotel rooms. In the series The Siege and Relief of Leiden (2011) Olaf depicts a number of now iconic scenes from the relief and brings the leading figures together in a dramatic setting. The series Keyhole (2011/2012), centered around Erwin Olaf’s first 3D installation. The Keyhole (already in the collection of the Museum voor Moderne Kunst Arnhem, The Netherlands and the Samsung Children’s Museum, Seoul, South Korea) balances on the thin line between intimacy, shame and feelings of guilt. In 2012 Erwin Olaf created the series Berlin, entirely shot on location. Using historically important settings in Berlin Erwin Olaf shows children and (young) adults in a transcendent relation with each other. In 2014 a new multimedia project named Waiting will be shown for the first time to the public.

Julius Tjintjelaar

francisco-solares-larrave

Joel-Julius-Tjintjelaar-03

Joel-Tjintjelaar-fstoppers-dani-diamond-500px-who-to-follow.-710x710

Paul Bellaart

 

 

 

 

1

 

Raul Neijhorst

 

 

1

2