Paul Russell

Paul Russell is a British street photographer, based in Weymouth, Dorset. He is a member of the In-Public international street photography collective.
Russell’s work has been published in one self-published book of his own, in a few survey publications on street photography, and is in the collection of the Museum of London. He has had solo exhibitions in venues around the UK, and in group exhibitions in various locations worldwide.
Phil Coomes, writing for BBC News in 2011, spoke of him as “street photographer Paul Russell whose eye for a humorous moment is as keen as any you will find.”

Clive Arrowsmith


Clive Arrowsmith is a celebrated international photographer who is based in London.
After leaving art school in North Wales, where he had studied painting and design, he attended Kingston College of Art (where he gained a first class Degree) on graduation he painted for two years. He then began taking photographs whilst working as a graphic designer for Rediffusion TV (the makers of the legendary music show Ready Steady Go!).
On leaving television to work as a photographer, he soon gained commissions from leading fashion magazines (following the delivery of a dynamic set of photos of the Paris Collections) for, most notably, British & French Vogue, Nova Magazine, Harpers, The Sunday Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Esquire U.S.A, and the F.T. “How to Spend It” luxury magazine and numerous publications world wide.
Clive continues to work in this genre in both editorial and advertising photography but is equally known for his music and celebrity images of Sir Paul McCartney, Wings, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck, George Harrison, Daniel Barenboim, Anna Netrebko, Art Garfunkel, Def Leppard, Prince Charles, Michael Caine and Damien Hirst to name just a few of the celebrated people he has photographed.
Clive is also an accomplished landscape and still life photographer with a large collection of archive images available at Camera Press London (contact Jaqui Wald on + 44 (0)207 940 9123).
Clive Arrowsmith is the only photographer to have photographed the Pirelli Calendar two years in succession, taking on the themes of Heroines and Chinese Astrology with typical enthusiasm. The Heroines calendar was also the subject of a TV documentary for Granada TV which was fronted by broadcasting legend Michael Aspel and documented the story behind the pictures, including the entire set blowing of the edge of a cliff!
Having worked on so many major stills advertising campaigns for clients like De Beers, Revlon, G.H.D. Morello, Caroline Castigliano, Lexus, Hassleblad and Yves Saint Laurent etc. Clive continued to broaden his creative scope by moving on to direct commercials. He has directed for Heinz, Revlon, Hamlet Cigars (winner of The Silver Lion Cannes Film Festival), Rapeed Sunglasses, Greenmail Whitney Beer and music videos of artists like Lee Griffiths, Jamiroquai, Jools Holland, ZTT and Def Leppard and still has ambitions to direct more documentary and film projects.
Clive has worked on the Free Tibet campaign with the Heavy Metal band, Chthonic, in Taiwan and has also photographed portraits of His Holiness the Dalai Lama several times.
Clive recently reinvigorated his long standing relationship with Japanese design legend Kansai Yamamoto (he designed the clothes for David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust incarnation) and travelled to Japan to work with Kansai photographing his new collection and filming behind the scenes at his ‘Hello Tokyo’ Super show”.
Clive was recently made a fellow of The Royal Photographic Society. His work is also included in the newly released limited edition book VOGUE Voice of The Century (Genesis Publications) and in 50 Years of Pirelli (Taschen publications).

Mark Fearnley

Mark Fearnley is a UK-based fine art street photographer who is completely impassioned by photography. He started off working as an interior decorative artist, painting grand houses using various paint effects. His love for art went further and Mark started painting abstract canvases, which in turn led to numerous exhibitions in different galleries around the country. From visiting these galleries and realising that photography uses much the same techniques as art, such as composition and focal point, and with his creative eye, his love for photography was born and this is where you find him today.
As a photographer Mark seeks to visualise a scene before it happens, often waiting to capture a moment that will hopefully then become a great photo. He has an addiction for black and white photography but is also just as at home working with colour.
As an artist, he enjoys experimenting with blur and abstract photography images, and you’ll be able to browse some in his website’s Portfolio. Mood and atmosphere play a big part in his photos. Another signature of Mark’s work is using the human element and negative space to add a narrative dimension: the rest of the storytelling is then left for you to decide for yourself.
Professionally, Mark offers fine art street photography workshops in London and everyone is welcome – from amateurs to professionals, mobile phone to DSLR users. Using a range of DSLRs and specialising in iPhone photography himself, an expert like Mark believes that the best camera you own is the one that you have with you.
Mark is inspired by global photographers such as Fan Ho, Januchi Hakoyama, Daido Moriyamo and Trent Park. In his website, you will find a spectrum of images in his Portfolio of his own travels around the globe showing examples of iPhone and DSLR photography.

Brasil, Alex Saberi

Alex Saberi is a National Geographic photographer from London. He began photography as a hobby by mainly taking photos of Richmond Park and has had a photo book of the park published in 2012. The park was the perfect place to practice his photography skills which he went onto use on his photo trips around the world. Most recently he has been spending his time photographing the beaches, jungles and wildlife of Ubatuba in Brazil.

He has appeared in many digital camera magazines and publications. As well as this Alex has won several photography competitions, from winning the Environmental Protection Agency’s wildlife competition, to winning on several worldwide online competition websites. He came second in Landscape photographer of the year with his photo “One man and his Dog”, and appeared several times in both the British wildlife photographer of the year books and landscape photographer of the year books.

He has also appeared much of the national press including Daily Mail, Metro, Evening Standard, The Times, The Sun, The Telegraph with his year in Richmond Park collection. He also appeared in the November edition of the national geographic and is a National Geographic exclusive artist.

Norman Parkinson

I like to make people look as good as they’d like to look, and with luck, a shade better

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Martin Chamberlain

I am a photographer based in London, UK. Many of the images on this website have featured in exhibitions around the world, including Australia, Nepal, Qatar, Austria, Italy, Czech Republic, Luxemburg and the UK. They have also featured in numerous magazines and books on travel photography.

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Nils Jorgensen

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Humans, Haris Nukem

It’s undeniable that Haris Nukem‘s photos are their own brand of cool. These aren’t typical glamour shots of cookie-cutter models in pristine settings. Models are sometimes photographed in rooms among strewn clothing, casually posing in bathtubs, doing headstands in hallways, or interacting with other fashionably attractive counterparts. The aforementioned models Haris captures are interesting and beautifully flawed creatures who emit vibes of effortless badassery. Freckles, tattoos, iconic beards, body modifications, and piercing eyes are captured in exquisitely high contrast. But, it’s not only the ‘rad’ individuals that make these photos so stylistically memorable and captivating; it’s a combination of the lighting that’s employed and masterful retouching that make for a cinematic look. Haris definitely portrays a darker, grittier side to fashion photography and has a refreshing take on portraiture.

Below you’ll find Haris’ straightforward, reflective, mildly humorous (i.e. “Tiger-Style”) responses to Beautiful.bizarre’s interview questions. To see more of his work beyond here, follow him on various forms of social media where you’ll stay up to date with his upcoming projects (#breatheproject and #capsulecouples), calls for London-based models, and see more of his radiant photography along with comical quips.

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Trevor Cole

 

To capture people, wildlife and landscapes and the interactions between them in the light of a world in transition is to encapsulate an inimitable moment which will never again materialise. My own ‘take’ as a geographer photographer!

Born in the City of Derry in Northern Ireland and still have inextricable links to my home country. Since leaving I have lived in England, Singapore, Togo, Italy, Ethiopia, Brazil and most recently in Ireland. My photography, together with travel, have become two of my life’s passions and they in turn are an integral part of having studied Geography at University and taught it in international schools. My photography focuses on culture, landscapes and wildlife; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life.

I believe fully in the concepts of sustainable tourism and development and in trying to support a perspective which enables a greater harmony to exist between people and their environment. I often use my images to educate or enhance the knowledge of others. This has promoted not only my own areas of interest but also a genuine interest in travel to others. Considered reflections may be used to market and to disseminate and promote acquired knowledge in a stimulating way. To record an image digitally or on film certainly helps to bring the reality of such experiences to life.

I have published images in magazines, calendars and cards and presented to the Royal Geographical Society. Images have been used for educational purposes and I have exhibited in Ethiopia and Ireland. I have also reached the final of travel photographer of the year (TPOTY) in 2010 and 2011.

My Facebook page is – http://www.facebook.com/AlternativeVisionsPhotography and 500px – http://500px.com/trevcole

Colin Templeton

I am a Glasgow-based, award-winning photographer with 22 years’ experience in news, features, PR, and sport. My work has appeared across the board, including The Guardian, The Times, The Sunday Times, The Independent, The Sun, Daily Express, The Mirror, Sunday Mirror, Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, Daily Record, Sunday Mail, The Scotsman, Scotland on Sunday, HELLO! magazine, Black + White Photography magazine and Leica Fotografie International magazine. Formerly a staff photographer with national titles The Herald/Sunday Herald/The National/Evening Times, I’m now freelancing in central Scotland, and beyond.

My in-depth experience of how PR and newspapers work means that I know what will work in a picture and, just as importantly, what won’t.

I studied photography at Glasgow College of Building and Printing and got my break shooting football matches for the Scottish Sun.

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Trevor Cole

To capture people, wildlife and landscapes and the interactions between them in the light of a world in transition is to encapsulate an inimitable moment which will never again materialise. My own ‘take’ as a geographer photographer!

Born in the City of Derry in Northern Ireland and still have inextricable links to my home country. Since leaving I have lived in England, Singapore, Togo, Italy, Ethiopia, Brazil and most recently in Ireland. My photography, together with travel, have become two of my life’s passions and they in turn are an integral part of having studied Geography at University and taught it in international schools. My photography focuses on culture, landscapes and wildlife; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life.

I believe fully in the concepts of sustainable tourism and development and in trying to support a perspective which enables a greater harmony to exist between people and their environment. I often use my images to educate or enhance the knowledge of others. This has promoted not only my own areas of interest but also a genuine interest in travel to others. Considered reflections may be used to market and to disseminate and promote acquired knowledge in a stimulating way. To record an image digitally or on film certainly helps to bring the reality of such experiences to life.

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Haris Nukem

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Sze Tsung Nicolás Leong

Sze Tsung Nicolás Leong is a British-American artist, born in Mexico City in 1970, and currently based in New York and Los Angeles.

Leong’s work includes the series Cities, a detailed depiction of urban formations throughout the globe, from medieval towns to recent constructions, that together form a picture of the world at this particular moment in time at the beginning of the twenty-first century; Horizons, an international collection of images of natural terrains and urban landscapes that considers the relationships between far and near, foreign and familiar; and History Images, which examines the erasure of history and the reshaping of society through the built environment.

Works from these series are included in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the National Galleries of Scotland, the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Yale University Art Gallery, among others.

Jonė Reed

Jone Reed‘s black and white photographs are as alluring as they are haunting. Whether it’s the blur of a body or the depth of shade and shadow, Reed has a natural ability to provoke emotion with her work. Describing photography as “the expression of artistic freedom,” her work transports the viewer to a place of atmospheric attraction

John Thomson

John Thomson (14 June 1837 – 29 September 1921) was a pioneering Scottish photographer, geographer, and traveller. He was one of the first photographers to travel to the Far East, documenting the people, landscapes and artefacts of eastern cultures. Upon returning home, his work among the street people of London cemented his reputation, and is regarded as a classic instance of social documentary which laid the foundations for photojournalism. He went on to become a portrait photographer of High Society in Mayfair, gaining the Royal Warrant in 1881.

Constance Stuart Larrabee

Constance Stuart Larrabee, a photographer who recorded the vanishing tribes of southern Africa, the World War II battlefields of Europe and her life on Maryland’s tranquil Eastern Shore, died on July 27 at her home in Chestertown, Md. She was 85.

Known as Constance Stuart earlier in her career, Mrs. Larrabee in 1997 donated her African images to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art, her World War II pictures to the Corcoran Gallery and her views of the Eastern Shore to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.

She photographed South African soldiers fighting their way up the Italian boot, as well as the liberation of Paris, with Gen. Charles de Gaulle, in profile, addressing a crowd. Finally, the show ended on a genteel note in Maryland, where she bred Norwich and Norfolk terriers on a farm and depicted the rivers and creeks, wildlife and people of her surroundings.

Two of her South African photographs were included in Edward Steichen’s famous international exhibition and collection of the mid-1950’s, ”The Family of Man.” The Museum of Modern Art billed it as ”the greatest photographic exhibition of all time,” and she shared the credits with the likes of Margaret Bourke-White, Frank Capra and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

Born in England, Mrs. Larrabee grew up in Pretoria, South Africa, and studied photography in London and Munich. In 1936 she started a portrait studio in Pretoria to capture the white South African elite along with visitors like Noel Coward and members of the British royal family.

Apart from her commercial work, she began to chronicle the vanishing ethnic cultures of Bushmen, Transkei peoples and others in the region. Her exhibitions drew national attention and led to her appointment as a war photographer.

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Malcolm Pasley

After studying photography at Art College and serving as an assistant for two years, Malcolm embarked on a career as a commercial fashion & beauty photographer in the 1980’s. After spending ten years doing this, and coinciding with a move to Los Angeles, he changed direction and became passionate about platinum printing, an early photographic printing process which involves hand coating papers with platinum salts to produce a completely permanent photographic image composed of metallic platinum. Having returned to Great Britain, he continues to work on personal and commissioned projects and exhibits in galleries in Europe, Japan and the United States.
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Tony Ray- Jones

Tony Ray-Jones died in 1972 from leukaemia, aged just 30. After studying photography in England in the late 1950s he went for further study in New York between 1961 and 1964. The exhibition explains that in America ‘the street’ was much more a focus of outdoor life and community and was much more photographed and described than in rainy England.

When he returned to the UK in 1965, Ray-Jones was determined to apply the American aesthetic to record the quirks and character of English street life and his pioneering approach to the drama and narrative of ‘ordinary’ life became hugely influential on all succeeding photographers.

Ray-Jones spent the later 1960s travelling extensively all over England, observing human beings in all their eccentricity and quirkiness. He was photographing what he saw as a disappearing way of life, aware of the onrushing encroachment of Americanisation, of consumerism, of white goods and conveniences which was replacing the England of back-to-backs, outside loos and heavy prams

All is not lost, Romany WG

In his ongoing series, All Is Not Lost, photographer Romany WG captures a different kind of beauty to abandoned buildings with the use of fearless models in his shots, often posing nude to convey passion, strength, softness and sometimes humour.

Choosing locations across Europe, he works with women whose “beauty works both in contrast and harmony to backdrops of forgotten industry, dying chateaus, decrepit hospitals and raw nature.” These exceptional images of female beauty and power distil the essence of defiance against the ravages of time.

Speaking further of the project, Romany said: “Ten years ago I started taking pictures of abandoned places, but after a few years I started to think there was something missing. These buildings were fairly soulless, so about five years ago I introduced models into my pictures. At first with costumes, but these became too bulky and restrictive – especially when trying to enter some abandoned sites. So then I found myself shooting more nudes.”

Now available in a limited edition book, All Is Not Lost makes a beautiful addition to the coffee table. Discover more at romanywg.com

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Chiko Ohayon

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