Dawn Black

"The Bather", De Pauw, Wassenaar

You could say that photography is in my blood. My father and grandfather were both keen amateur photographers plus my grandfather also worked at Ilford, the black and white film and paper company. As a youngster I was usually to be found with a camera in hand and justifiably earned the affectionate nickname of “David Bailey” in the family.

This early creativity and interest grew and saw me study History of Art and Architecture at university. This love of history and architectural design shows still in my landscape images as I have a tendency to include historical and modern buildings within the landscapes I photograph.

My passion for photography has continued to grow in the 30 years since I first picked up a camera. The creative possibilities provided by the digital technology now available has led me to where I am now, providing professional photographic services and selling my fine art images in a variety of media.

I endeavour to capture my images in-camera only using post processing to optimise the image with minimal adjustments – colour balance, exposure and contrast plus converting to black and white – much in the same way photographers of old processed in the dark room.

I have been very fortunate in having lived in three different countries over the past 13 years. In 2003 my family moved from Scotland to Singapore which afforded me some fantastic travel photography opportunities including many destinations within Australia plus Cambodia. I am now based in The Netherlands having returned to Europe in 2010. Here I am grasping the opportunity for travel with two hands, producing travel and fine art images from the UK, USA, Jordan, Malta, Italy, Austria and France plus locally within The Netherlands.

Commercially I have spent the last 5 years building up a busy interiors photography business. I help hotels and guest houses to showcase their spaces as well as helping property clients to increase their perceived value and speed up the rental and sales by enticing viewings with stunning but realistic images.


Bert Hardy



The eldest of seven children, Bert Hardy rose from humble working class origins in Blackfriars, London, leaving school at age 14 to work for a chemist where he learnt how to chemically process photos.

After selling 200 prints of King George V and Queen Mary passing by in a carriage, he went on to freelance for The Bicycle magazine, saving up to buy a second-hand, small-format Leica 35 mm camera which was to change his life.

Self taught and using the small Leica camera instead of the traditional larger press cameras, Hardy was recruited by the editor of Picture Post, Tom Hopkinson, in 1941. He went on to become the Post’s Chief Photographer, earning his first photographer credit for a February 1941 photo-essay about Blitz-stressed fire-fighters.

Hardy later served as a war photographer in the Army Film and Photographic Unit (AFPU) from 1942 until 1946, covering the D-Day landings in June 1944, the liberation of Paris and the allied advance across the Rhine. He was also one of the first photographers to enter the liberated Belsen to record the dreadful scenes there.

His later photo-journalism took him all around the world, and his famous 1951 Picture Post photograph of two young women sitting on railings at Blackpool – which has been reproduced all over the world – was taken on a humble Box Brownie camera.


Mick Waghorne

17-Pensive - Suzanne Marshall

Mick Waghorne is a photographer based in Wiltshire, England. As he wrote: “Whilst I was interested in photography as a teenager this largely waned until the onset of digital photography.”
In the last years has focused in shoot of nudes in studio environment.
“I like the blank canvas that I have before me and the challenge of creating something in tandem with the model with whom I’m working. The creation of the image is a two way thing.


Maisie Broadhead


Maisie Broadhead is an artist and visiting lecturer at the Royal College of Art, London. She established her studio in London in 2009 and has had five solo shows to date. Maisie’s work has been part of major shows at the National Gallery and the Design Museum London, National Gallery of Victoria, Australia and she won the Jerwood Makers Open in 2012 and the Pavilion Contemporary 3 commission in 2014. 

Her work is often a dialogue between the hand made object and the photographic image


Chiko Ohayon



Ben Hassett



Brian Venth



Finbarr O’Reilly


The best stories are those that challenge preconceived notions about a place or an issue, that challenge stereotypes and make people rethink their view on things

Felicity Ingram




Christopher Rimme


In an attempt to articulate the visceral potency of Christopher Rimmer’s photography, the author, Tony Park said Rimmer’s work looked so deeply into Africa’s heart that you could almost feel the heat and taste the dust.

Christopher Rimmer was born in England an emigrated to South Africa as a child. He began taking photographs as a teenager with a plastic 35mm Hanimex camera. After immigrating to Australia in 1981, he studied photography formally, firstly under Werner Hammerstingl and then later at Rusden College under Paul Green. He graduated in 1991.

His critically acclaimed photographs of Africa have been widely published in media around the world. He has exhibited in group and solo shows both in Australia and in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, South Africa & the U.S. His work is represented in several corporate and notable private collections. He obtained an Excellence accreditation in the Federation International de l’Art photographique in 2009 and platinum in 2010 and in 2012 received an Honourable Mention at the Montargis National Contest in France. He is a member of the Royal Photographic Society and was shortlisted for British magazine B&W Photographer of the Year for his work in Southern Africa in 2011 and again in 2012.

In 2014 his work ‘Sign of Life’ was screened at Visa Pour L’Image, Perpignan in France and the Ankor Photographic Festival in Cambodia.

Christopher Rimmer’s most recent work, Amapondo, photographed on the east coast of South Africa, will be exhibited throughout 2015 at Art Expo New York, Jan Royce Gallery, Cape Town, Art Room 9, Munich, Art San Diego, Spectrum Miami and Jeff Makin Gallery in Melbourne, Australia.

Art Business News Magazine nominated Christopher Rimmer Top Artist to Watch in their 2015 summer edition.

A stunning collection by a talented photographer. Prepare for a journey not just to Africa but to an oasis of balance and beauty.
Tim Butcher – Author

Rimmer’s portraits are richly layered with potent cross-cultural symbolism, a fusion of South African and Western imagery and fundamentally emotive. They are also simply stunning, peaceful, even joyful works by a masterful photographer.
Dr. Shireen Huda – Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Water Drops, Dave Wood




Dave Wood is a talented photographer from Bury, who currently based in Manchester, England. He started playing around with photography in September 2009 after borrowing a friends Nikon. Dave shoot a lot of macro, landscape and architecture photography, but his favourite category is water drops.

Paul Goldstein




Thomas Annan


Thomas Annan

michael james o’brien



Terry O’Neill


Terry O’Neill is a British photographer. He gained notoriety documenting the fashions, styles, and celebrities of the 1960s. O’Neill’s photographs display his knack for capturing his subjects candidly or in unconventional settings. His work has also been featured in numerous exhibitions. He was awarded The Royal Photographic Society’s Centenary medal ‘in recognition of a sustained, significant contribution to the art of photography’ in 2011

No other living photographer has embraced the span of fame, capturing the icons of our age from Winston Churchill to Nelson Mandela, from Frank Sinatra and Elvis to Amy Winehouse, from Audrey Hepburn and Brigitte Bardot to Kate Moss, as well as every James Bond from Sean Connery to Pierce Brosnan.

He photographed The Beatles and The Rolling Stones when they were still struggling young bands in 1963, pioneered backstage reportage photography with David Bowie, Elton John, The Who, Eric Clapton and Chuck Berry and his images have adorned historic rock albums, movie posters and international magazine covers.

Patrick Lichfield



Valda Bailey


I live in East Sussex although I grew up on the island of Jersey. I still retain an affinity for seascapes and coastal views even though I no longer have a beautiful beach on my back doorstep.

My approach to photography is greatly informed by my background in painting and I use in-camera multiple exposure and ICM (intentional camera movement) to blur detail and abstract shapes in the landscape.

I am driven by an exploration of colour and form. My objective is to create multi-layered images that depict the subtleties of the landscape around us. I am more concerned with portraying an interpretation rather than a literal representation of what I see before me.

I have been fortunate to have been tutored by some highly talented and inspirational professionals, most notably Jay Maisel and the time spent with him and his impressive array of guest speakers in New York continues to influence the way I approach my work.

I enjoy trying to push the boundaries of what photography is about and I strive to produce work that has movement and energy. A pivotal moment for me was coming across the work of Chris Friel and subsequently being tutored in the alternative techniques needed to produce such results by Doug Chinnery.

I have been influenced by many great talents; some of my inspirations include afore-mentioned Jay Maisel, Chris Friel and Doug Chinnery. Also Susan Burnstine, Fay Godwin, Ernst Haas, Aaron Siskind, Andre Kertesz, Vivian Maier, Sarah Moon, Arnold Newman, Klavdij Sluban, Alexey Titarenko, Charlie Waite to name just a few. Painters whose work I particularly admire include Bonnard, Cezanne, Chagall, Diebenkorn, Kandinsky, Klee, Matisse, Rothko, Van Gogh Frankethaler and many others too numerous to mention.

Olivia Arthur


Olivia Arthur is a British documentary photographer and member of the Magnum photography agency. Originally studying mathematics at Oxford University she later studied photojournalism at the London College of Printing.

She began working as a photographer in 2003 after moving to Delhi and was based in India for two and a half years.
In 2006 she left for Italy to take up a one-year residency with Fabrica, during which she began working on a series about women and the East-West cultural divide. This work has taken her to the border between Europe and Asia, Iran and Saudi Arabia. She has recieved support from the Inge Morath Award, the National Media Museum, OjodePez-PhotoEspana Award for Human Values.
In 2010 she co-founded Fishbar, a space for photography in London with Philipp Ebeling.
Her first book Jeddah Diary, about young women in Saudi Arabia, was published in 2012.
She continues to return to India – where her long-term work has been supported by a grant from the Fondation Jean-Luc Lagadere in Paris – and to

Baz Ratner



Philip Jones Griffiths

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Born in Rhuddlan, Wales, Philip Jones Griffiths studied pharmacy in Liverpool and worked in London while photographing part-time for the Manchester Guardian. In 1961 he became a full-time freelancer for the London-based Observer. He covered the Algerian War in 1962, then moved to Central Africa. From there he moved to Asia, photographing in Vietnam from 1966 to 1971.

His book on the war, Vietnam Inc., crystallized public opinion and gave form to Western misgivings about American involvement in Vietnam. One of the most detailed surveys of any conflict, Vietnam Inc. is also an in-depth document of Vietnamese culture under attack.

An associate member of Magnum since 1966, Griffiths became a member in 1971. In 1973 he covered the Yom Kippur War and then worked in Cambodia between 1973 and 1975. In 1977 he covered Asia from his base in Thailand. In 1980 Griffiths moved to New York to assume the presidency of Magnum, a post he held for a record five years.

Griffiths’ assignments, often self-engineered, took him to more than 120 countries. He continued to work for major publications such as Life and Geo on stories such as Buddhism in Cambodia, droughts in India, poverty in Texas, the re-greening of Vietnam, and the legacy of the Gulf War in Kuwait. His continued revisiting of Vietnam, examining the legacy of the war, lead to his two further books ‘Agent Orange’ and ‘Vietnam at Peace’.

Griffiths’ work reflects on the unequal relationship between technology and humanity, summed up in his book Dark Odyssey. Human foolishness always attracted Griffiths’ eye, but, faithful to the ethics of the Magnum founders, he believed in human dignity and in the capacity for improvement

Philip Jones Griffiths died at home in West London on 19th March 2008