Mauro De Bettio

Difficult to express, but I’m quite sure photography is for me my primary way of speaking.
In my life I had the chance to visit wonderful places and especially to meet great people.
My purpose is, and has always been, capture the feeling of what I “touch”, not just the appearance of it.
Capture the essence and express the nuances of a person in just one frame showing those subtleties that can be hard to describe in words.
Reproducing every emotion, from happiness to sadness, from fear to excitement.
Through simply showing an images, evoke an emotion in someone else, make people stop and think.
Stop them in their tracks just with a glance at an image.
Photography is a fantastic story-telling medium.
Just ask yourself what story you want to tell, and photography can get you there.

Mauro De Bettio (born March 4, 1975) lives now in Barcelona, Spain.

Larry Towell

Larry Towell’s business card reads ‘Human Being’. Experience as a poet and a folk musician has done much to shape his personal style. The son of a car repairman, Towell grew up in a large family in rural Ontario. During studies in visual arts at Toronto’s York University, he was given a camera and taught how to process black and white film.
A stint of volunteer work in Calcutta in 1976 provoked Towell to photograph and write. Back in Canada, he taught folk music to support himself and his family. In 1984 he became a freelance photographer and writer focusing on the dispossessed, exile and peasant rebellion. He completed projects on the Nicaraguan Contra war, on the relatives of the disappeared in Guatemala, and on American Vietnam War veterans who had returned to Vietnam to rebuild the country. His first published magazine essay, ‘Paradise Lost’, exposed the ecological consequences of the catastrophic Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska’s Prince William Sound. He became a Magnum nominee in 1988, and a full member in 1993.
In 1996 Towell completed a project based on ten years of reportage in El Salvador, followed the next year by a major book on the Palestinians. His fascination with landlessness also led him to the Mennonite migrant workers of Mexico, an eleven-year project completed in 2000. With the help of the inaugural Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, he finished a second highly acclaimed book on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in 2005, and in 2008 released the award-winning The World From My Front Porch, a project on his own family in rural Ontario where he sharecrops a 75 acre farm.

Alain Daussin

The Belgian Alain Daussin, who was born in Brussels, was introduced to the world of picture by a comic strip drawer (Maurice Tillieux) and started photography studies in 1977 in a school of the City of Brussels. After three years, he entered the labour market. But he was soon discovered by the “Photo” magazine (France), and his pictures were published under the heading ‘young talent’. From that time on, he worked for lots of magazines and advertising campaigns. He specialized in female photography. In 1983, his career was launched: some of his pictures were spread in the whole world through the publishing of black and white art posters and postcards (Catch publishing, Verkerke, Art Unlimited). In 1985, he received the Eurobest Award of advertising for his picture in the Belgian campaign » Le soir, les hommes accouchent « . Although he was more famous for his black and white pictures, he did not abandon the colour pictures. Since the middle of the eighties, he has collaborated on a regular basis with magazines such as « Photo », « Max », « Telerama », « Zoom » in France or « Elle », « Knacht », « Donna », « Per lui » in Italy, « Stern » in Germany, for « Amateur Photographer’s » in London … He had an exhibition in London in the Portfolio Gallery within the framework of the festival of contemporary art as well as in Rome and Milan in 1990 within the framework of an exhibition that was organized by Lancôme, called « Imagine Donna, La femme de 1940 à nos jours ». In 2000, he exhibited at the Bortier gallery in Brussels a work called « Corps et Eau ». He joined the « Getty images » group in 1997. Alain Daussin Works for advertising (Bultex, Renault (Award), Vedior, Mac- Leans, Le Soir) and collaborates with the biggest European magazines. He also had an exhibition in Brussels in Gallery « Espace Blanche » in 2007. In 2014 his work was exhibited in Genève in the gallery « Krisal » and in Saint Tropez (France). His work his regularly sold in contemporary art fairs such as the « Art Hamptons » fine art fair in US, Cornette de saint Cyr in Belgium or Drouot in France. Online magazines (ND Magazine, Fineartnude, Monovisions) specialized in photography regularly publish his images. Today, Alain Daussin lives in Brussels and keeps collaborating for with Getty images, magazines and fine art market.

Schilte & Portielje,

Schilte & Portielje, who live and work in Rotterdam, are primarily known for their photography of series of unusual and very recognizable figurines. They display an intricate way of playing with and relating to each other: fantastic poetic, dreamlike figures who abduct the spectator into the artists world of wonders and miracles. The figures approach in the middle of a nondescript, plain, undefined room. They offer frontal and back views and grotesquely contorted bodies. They wear costumes adorned with veils and lace, corsages and garters, jewelry, neckties and collars, transparent fabrics and body hugging clothes. All these accessories create different characters in this theatric role play. The game lives of abstraction. How do huge feet go with a delicate body? Which intricacies are woven into the mesh of physical abnormalities? How do these bodies relate to the pieces of furniture that have been added to the decor for the characters to hold onto or lean against? It is the full intention of the artists not to give a satisfactory answer to these questions, they willingly create confusion and force the spectator to focus more intensely.

During recent years, the artists perfected their mise en scene. “Photoworks beyond reality” emphasizes surprising moments in surrealist, erotically charged moments. This creates a scrapbook full of subtle hints and uncertain role play. We can never see the full faces of Schilte & Portielje‘s figurines, mouth and nose are rarely recognizable, the entire head is mostly covered by eclectic hats, fabrics, hairdos or the entire face is headed another way.
Subtle eroticism, demanding poses or the quiet poetry of desire are the elements used in this dark world rich in contrast. Most of the time, female characters appear in his series. „Our work deals with the fundamental aspects of human existence, male or female alike. Sexual identity is not our subject, but ambiguity is important for us because it creates room for interpretation and identification,” say the artists.

Huub Schilte and Jacqueline Portielje collaborate since 1997 under the name Schilte & Portielje. „We prefer to work in absence of a preset theme or subject. We chose fragments of images from our own digital library, and then proceed independently to determine how the chosen fragment could fit into the concept of the new work. Frequently, we exchange the works so that one continues where the other stopped.”

Sometimes their work reminds the viewer of the sought-after Carte de Visite images, in fashion during the second half of the 19th century. However, the subjects of Schilte & Portielje are extremely timely. Their forms and design with historical patterns – like the consistent use of black-and-white photography reference analog role models. But the photographers use a well developed digital collage technique to achieve their trademark figurine, very much anchored in the present. „Most importantly, we look at our work settled somewhere between photography and painting. We love contrast between computer techniques and the slightly nostalgic charm of black-and white photography that enables us to increase the distance between art and reality.” The presentation of their work also resembles the classical medium of photography. By framing their work in historical fashion and protecting the surface with shellac they give their prints the aura of uniqueness, strongly resembling paintings.

Christian Lamontagne

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Pedro Luis Raota

Raota retrató gauchos, niños, obreros, ancianos, campesinos y familias. Lo hizo en la Pampa, en los Andes, en los países del Este de Europa, pero también se recreó con igual soltura ante paisajes de relevante teatralidad, ante imágenes de un fotoperiodismo de gran precisión o con creaciones cuya composición desafía la imaginación del espectador
Adelantándose a las técnicas digitales, Raota plasma retazos de una realidad que parecen sacados de un escenario teatral, cuyos protagonistas tienen una desgarradora fuerza en su mirada. Sólo la elegancia de los encuadres y el tamiz de la luz parecen poder competir con el magnetismo de los ojos, reclamo del alma de los seres que pueblan sus fotografías. 

Michel Gravel

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François Kollar

Francois Kollar (1904-1979) was born in Hungary. In 1923 he moved to Paris, where he worked as a studio manager for the printing company Draeger. At 24 he became a professional photographer, setting up his own studio in 1930. Kollar employed many of the new vision photographic techniques and found commercial work with several fashion magazines, as well as advertising agencies. Throughout his photographic career, he was drawn to industrial subjects. Kollar often photographed people in their roles in the production process; likely, he was influenced by his first jobs working on the railways and as a lathe operator in a car factory.

Floria González

Floria Gónzález was born in Monterrey on July 20, 1980n NL, moving to Acuña Coahuila in 1983, moved to Mexico City an age 16 where he lives and works. She studied photography and film in Mexico City and San Antonio, TX. In 2003 she starts working forming two ways; one inside photography and commercial video and the other in art.

Mario Tursi

Mario Tursi was born in Rome on 9th August 1929 from a family of photographer; his father was a photoengraver and his mother a photographer and manager of photographic labs.

Since an early age he began to use the camera. In the years 1943-44 he made his professional apprenticeship working as “street photographer” for Studio Lombardini.Soon after the Liberation he was hired by Felice Giordani, official Vatican photographer, for whom he worked for a couple of years, until 1948 when he started as photo reporter for agency VEDO (Visioni Editoriali Diffuse Ovunque), the most important Italian agency at the time, run by Adolfo Porry Pastotel. He began to work also for the Associated Press and made several reportages around the world.

In 1956 he took over the agency VEDO and became the manager. During that time he started to go on film sets for some specials. Within years, his visits on film sets from irregular became more and more frequent, extended also to international productions. In 1962, with Mare matto directed by Renato Castellani, he debuted as still photographer, followed by, two years later, Let’s Talk About Men by Lina Wertmuller.

Closed down the agency VEDO in 1965, he definitely focused on cinema photography beginning, among other things, working with Visconti, who wanted him on the set of all his latest films.

Since then he has worked with mainly all of the major Italian directors from Pasolini to Petri, from Rosi to Lattuada to Scola. He worked a lot also with younger directors such as Giuseppe Bertolucci, Massimo Troisi and Roberto Benigni. Often he was asked to work abroad as recorded by the films The name of the Rose by Annaud, Pirates by Polanski, The Last Temptation of Christ by Scorsese and The Horseman on the Roof by Rappeneau.

In 1979 he received a special mention for the still photographs taken for Stay as You Are during the 8th edition of “The Hollywood Reporter” Key Art Awards and, in 1989, he won in Cannes the Grand Prix of Cinema Photography for the shots on The Last Temptation of Christ. In recent years he followed the making of Kundun by Scorsese, Dangerous Beauty by Herskovits, A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Hoffman, Titus by Taymor and U-571 by Mostow. His last work was on the set of Gangs of New York by Martin Scorsese, film he recorded entirely.

Considered among the greatest still photographers of Italian cinema, Mario Tursi died in Roma on 1st September 2008.

John Vachon

Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, John Vachon received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from St. Thomas College at age twenty, followed by further studies at the Catholic University of America (1935–36). After being hired as an assistant messenger with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) in 1937, Vachon quickly developed his own photographic skills. He became a member of the FSA’s regular photographic staff and produced memorable documentary series in the Plains states. After moving to New York, Vachon in 1947 became a member of the Photo League, contributing numerous book reviews to the newsletter Photo Notes and participating in the 1948 exhibition This Is the Photo League. After working for many years as a staff photographer at Look magazine, Vachon became a visiting professor at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1974.

Erwin Blumenfeld

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Erwin Blumenfeld proved himself to be one of photography’s greatest pioneers during his 35-year-long career, breaking new ground in formal experimentation, developing innovative concepts through his fashion shoots, and enjoying unprecedented commercial success as a result.

Blumenfeld’s entry into photography was somewhat serendipitous: in the early 1930s, while running a leather shop in Amsterdam, he uncovered a fully equipped darkroom behind a boarded-up door in a storeroom, allegedly left behind by a previous tenant.

So he began experimenting, eventually forging a path for himself as a portrait photographer and displaying his photos in the shop’s windows. His earliest creations – collages and satirical pieces created in the Dadaist tradition to channel his anti-war sentiment – are a fascinating insight into his work.

As his practice evolved, Blumenfeld continued to reject photography’s formal limitations, playing instead with double and triple exposures, solarisation and high-contrast printing to achieve his uncompromising artistic vision.

As Blumenfeld turned from art to fashion photography – he made his debut in Vogue with the help of fashion royalty Cecil Beaton in 1944, and his dynamic concepts and exaltation of women made him a favourite among the most influential fashion magazines of the day – these progressive techniques only continued.

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Seydou Keïta

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Seydou Keïta’s photographs eloquently portray Bamako society during its era of transition from a cosmopolitan French colony to an independent capital. Initially trained by his father to be a carpenter, Keïta’s career as a photographer was launched in 1935 by an uncle who gave him his first camera, a Kodak Brownie Flash, which he had purchased during a trip to Senegal. During his adolescence Keïta mastered the technical challenges of shooting and printing; he later purchased a large-format camera. The larger format not only offered an exceptional degree of resolution, it also made it possible for Keïta to make high quality contact prints without the aid of an enlarger. In 1948 he opened his own studio in Bamako and he quickly built up a successful business. Whether photographing single individuals, families, or professional associations, Keïta balanced a strict sense of formality with a remarkable level of intimacy with his subjects. Like many professional photographers, he furnished his studio with numerous props, from backdrops and costumes, to Vespas and luxury cars. He would renew these props every few years, which later allowed him to establish a chronology for his work. Keïta commented on his studio practice, “It’s easy to take a photo, but what really made a difference was that I always knew how to find the right position, and I was never wrong. Their head slightly turned, a serious face, the position of the hands . . . I was capable of making someone look really good.”

Keïta went to exceptional lengths to bring out the beauty of his subjects and the brilliant patterns of his backdrops proved a particularly effective foil. He worked intuitively, reinventing portrait photography through his search for extreme precision. In 1962 the newly installed Socialist government made Keïta its official photographer; shortly thereafter he closed down his studio, although he remained active until his retirement in 1977. His archive of over 10,000 negatives was gradually brought to light in the early 1990s; Keïta has since achieved international recognition. Inventive and highly modern, his emphasis on the essential components of portrait photography—light, subject, framing—firmly establishes Keïta among the twentieth-century masters of the genre.

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Mario De Biasi

Deported in Germany, Mario de Biasi begins to take photographs in 1944 thanks to a camera found in the rubbles of Nuremberg. He becomes famous with his portraits of actresses such as Claudia Cardinale, Brigitte Bardot or Sophia Loren alongside the depiction of the Iran Shah’s wedding. Yet what earned the Italian photographer the nickname of the ‘Italiano pazzo’ (the mad Italian) was his reports of conflicts such as the Hungarian revolution of 1956 or extreme experiences such as his Siberian exploration, throughout the world. Uniting the glamour of actresses to social episodes, Mario de Biasi created one of his most iconic images thanks to a group of Italian men observing the curvaceous back of Moira Orfei.

Inge Morath

 

 


I personally arrived slowly at photography. I studied languages at university, took some courses in journalism, worked first as a translator and then as an editor for the Information Services Branch of the occupying American Forces in Salzburg, later in Vienna. In my spare time I wrote playlets for the Red-White-Red network and articles for various illustrated magazines, among them the Wiener Illustrierte. I started to be asked to supply some suitable photographs with my stories, which left me at a loss. I had never seriously occupied myself with photography; I did not even know a photographer. I had always been passionately interested in painting and drawing, but the artistic poverty of the “Third Reich,” where our only chance to see the major achievements of contemporary art was in (from my side at least) eagerly awaited exhibitions hung in school corridors under the title Entartete Kunst (degenerate art, including Picasso, etc.), provided no possibility for an education in visual matters. So I started to buy LIFE Magazine and photographic books and in my search for photographers I met Lothar Rübelt and Franz Hubmann and Erich Lessing and Ernst Haas.

Meanwhile I had become the Austrian editor of Heute magazine, published by the Americans in Munich, and started to work with Ernst Haas as a photography-writer team. Heute editor Warren Trabant forwarded a couple of our stories to Robert Capa, who summoned us to join the young Magnum Photos in Paris. Supplied with much food and a little money we boarded a train, left Vienna and stayed in Paris. Besides my work with Ernst, I started to write texts for the photographs sent to the Paris office by the then members of Magnum from all kinds of countries: Cartier-Bresson from the Orient, George Rodger from Africa, David Seymour from Greece, etc. I started to accompany different photographers on assignments for which also I had done the preparatory research, and later edited their contact sheets. I think that it is from this work that I learned the most.

A short marriage to an Englishman brought separation from Magnum and a move to London. I continued to write stories but found to my amazement that suddenly now that I was no longer accompanied by photographers the world around me seemed to be filled with things that wanted to be photographed. I had finally discovered my own way to express what interested or obsessed me in a way with which I could live. After the war I had often suffered from the fact that my native language, German, was for most of the world the language of the enemy, and although I was able to write stories in English or French it did not touch the roots. So turning to the image felt both like a relief and an inner necessity.

I took up a period of apprenticeship with Simon Guttmann, who had the reputation of a querulous genius of the picture magazine world; he had played a role in the early days of the Berliner Illustrierte under the Ullsteins. Somewhere along the way, Robert Capa had been one of his apprentices, too. Now Simon Guttmann worked as an adviser to Picture Post. I bought a used Leica, worked incessantly and, as I was known as the only non-photographing person in this milieu and knew I would not be taken seriously if I suddenly showed up with photographs, I turned my name around and, as Egni Tharom, started sending my picture stories to any magazine I thought might be interested. Sometimes I sold something, sometimes I got letters praising my eye but deploring my technique. I spent nights in the darkrooms of professionals, learning a lot as a free assistant. For Mr. Guttmann I stood in front of theatres to take pictures of arriving luminaries, and covered catastrophes like floods and fires.

As I was selling more pictures, my confidence grew. I went back to Paris and worked for three months on a story about the Prêtres Ouvriers (worker priests), the first militant Catholic priests who, as “missionaries within their own country” and with permission from their orders, lived the life of workers in factories and the poorest quarters of Paris. It was a difficult story, and when I finally was finished, pictures enlarged and text written, I decided to risk it. I showed it all to Capa, asking his opinion about the photographs which he liked. So I confessed that I had taken them and after the first shock he said, “Ok, show me the rest of your work; if it is as good we’ll take you.”

So I was invited to join Magnum, first for a year as an associate, then as a full member. There followed many years of constant travel, shooting stories in different parts of the world, as well as industrial work, stills for movies and theatre, fashion, works for art magazines shot with big cameras and, more and more, portraits. In 1956, my first book Fiesta in Pamplona appeared. And so it has really more or less been going on until today.

Lemvo Jean Abou Bakar Depara

Photographer Lemvo Jean Abou Bakar Depara captured the life of beautiful young people living in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s during the 1950’s-70’s, a time when fashion, music, clubs and night-life was greatly influenced by Europe and the West.
Depara purchased his first video camera to record his wedding in 1950; four years later, he was made official photographer to the Zairian singer Franco. In 1975 he became official photographer to the National Assembly of Democratic Republic of Congo. He also took many photographs of the social scene of Kinshasa. He opened his studio, Jean Whisky Depara, in Kinshasa. He worked there until 1956 making portraits, family photographs and pictures of celebrations. In that time Kinshasa was a center for music where rumba and cha-cha were played the whole night. Many people from West Africa came there to spend the night in the clubs and cafes.
Depara mixed with the public as a photographer. He was famous for his love for women, whom he tried to seduce camera in hand. At his death in 1997 he left a large archive of untitled negatives; many of these have been reprinted and titled for sale since his death.

Mucuripe, Chico Albuquerque

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Hugo Cifuentes


Hugo Gilberto Cifuentes Navarro, nacido en Otavalo, Ecuador, en 1923 fue un artista plastico y fotógrafo pionero latinoamericano. Cifuentes comenzó a estudiar dibujo y pintura en la década de 1940, antes de dedicarse a la fotografía. Recibió su primer premio de composición fotográfica en 1949. En la década de 1960, Cifuentes se unió a VAN, Vanguardia Artística Nacional, un grupo de artistas progresistas informales, fundado por Enrique Tábara, que rompió la tradición artística predominante y se inspiró en el Movimiento Constructivista, el Movimiento Surrealista y el arte precolombino. A medida que Cifuentes desarrollaba su propio vocabulario visual, los matices humorísticos se hicieron evidentes en su arte. Cifuentes respondió a conflictos internos y otras miserias que se apoderaron de Ecuador con humor. Al ver las cosas desde un ángulo diferente, Cifuentes agregó nuevas capas a las realidades a menudo difíciles. En 1983, Cifuentes ganó el Premio Casa de las Américas. Murio en Quito, Ecuador, en el año 2000

Franco Pinna

Franco Pimna was an Italian photographer of the second half of the 20th century and one of the main representatives of neorealism. He developed his work in black and white.

He was born in La Maddalena, on July 29, 1925. In 1952 he moved to Rome and, after a brief experience as a cinedocumentary operator, constituted the cooperative Fotografi Associati together with Plinio De Martiis, Caio Mario Garrubba, Nicola Sansone, Pablo Volta, which was dissolved in 1954 due to economic difficulties. He followed the anthropologist Ernesto De Martino during several research expeditions in southern Italy, obtaining documents of great artistic and cultural value. In 1959 he published his first book, entitled La Sila, which was followed by Sardegna una civiltà di pietra . Meanwhile, his photos appear in the magazines Life, Stern, Sunday Times, Vogue, Paris Match, Epoca, L’espresso, Panorama. From 1965 Pinna became the trusted photographer of Federico Fellini and made scene photos of his films Giulietta degli spiriti, up to Fellini’s Casanova in 1976; he also publishes some photo books inspired by his films. He died suddenly in Rome on April 2, 1978.

Complex City, Arindam Thokder


Large cities in India have some distinctive characteristics. Among other things they are large, busy, and chaotic. Since I was raised in a small town in northeast India my first reaction, when visiting such a city, was to be overwhelmed by its complexity. I was fascinated by the skyscrapers, hoardings, traffic, and the large numbers of people (many of who were, just like me, chasing their dreams). After moving to Bangalore, I began to roam its streets with my camera. Soon I discovered beauty in the most mundane of everyday encounters. I became enamored with colors in a market, the play of shadows on a street, and the unintentional balletic dance of passing strangers. Photographing these kinds of things has brought many smiles to my face, and that’s why I’m looking forward to continuing my ongoing journey of discovery.