Max Dupain

Max Dupain was Australia’s most respected and influential black & white photographer of the 20th century. His images capture a long gone era in which Australian society was vastly different from what it is now. With his documentary eye his images exude quality and demonstrate Dupain’s mastership of light and form.

Dupain was considered the pioneer of modernism in Australian photography, an approach that departed from the sentimentality of soft focused, nostalgic imagery to the simplified world of light contrasts, sharp focus, varying angles and creative compositions.

Aydın Büyüktaş

Aydın Büyüktaş, who was born in Ankara in 1972, dropped out form Bilkent University Tourism Management Department because it was not his future dream. After moving to Istanbul in 2000’s, he took charge in many awarded movies and advertising drives, while he is working for avant-garde companies such as Sinefekt and Makinefx after having improved himself in the fields of visual effect, 3D, animation and video. He started to give priority to freelance works after his character, which was designed by him in the form of 3D in 2008, gained international popularity. While he interested in Photography, he also has been continuing his academic education at the department of photography of Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University since 2012.

Jacob Riis

A pioneer in the use of photography as an agent of social reform, Jacob Riis immigrated to the United States in 1870. While working as a police reporter for the New York Tribune, he did a series of exposés on slum conditions on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, which led him to view photography as a way of communicating the need for slum reform to the public. He made photographs of these areas and published articles and gave lectures that had significant results, including the establishment of the Tenement House Commission in 1884. In 1888, Riis left the Tribune to work for the Evening Sun, where he began making the photographs that would be reproduced as engravings and halftones in How the Other Half Lives, his celebrated work documenting the living conditions of the poor, which was published to widespread acclaim in 1890. During the last twenty-five years of his life, Riis produced other books on similar topics, along with many writings and lantern slide lectures on themes relating to the improvement of social conditions for the lower classes. Despite their success during his lifetime, however, his photographs were largely forgotten after his death; ultimately his negatives were found and brought to the attention of the Museum of the City of New York, where a retrospective exhibition of his work was held in 1947.

Riis was among the first in the United States to conceive of photographic images as instruments for social change; he was also among the first to use flash powder to photograph interior views, and his book How the Other Half Lives was one of the earliest to employ halftone reproduction successfully. At a time when the poor were usually portrayed in sentimental genre scenes, Riis often shocked his audience by revealing the horrifying details of real life in poverty-stricken environments. His sympathetic portrayal of his subjects emphasized their humanity and bravery amid deplorable conditions, and encouraged a more sensitive attitude towards the poor in this country.

Lisa Hostetler

Danny Lyon

Danny Lyon is a photo-journalist, writer and filmmaker.

Among his many books are The Bikeriders, Conversations with the Dead, and Knave of Hearts. His latest non-fiction book is Like A Thief’s Dream, PowerHouse Books. Daniel Joseph Lyon was born in Brooklyn , New York on March 16, 1942. Roosevelt was President. World War Two was on going in Europe, Africa and Asia. Segregation was the law of the land in 13 southern states. Native Americans were not allowed to purchase alcohol in New Mexico. Most blacks could not or did not vote in the deep south. Lyon attended NYC public schools in Kew Gardens and Forest Hills, Queens, and in 1959 bought his first camera, an Exa SLR in Munich, Germany during a summer trip, then entered the University of Chicago, where he eventually majored in philosophy and ancient history. In 1963 he became The Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee’s (SNCC) first photographer . Danny Lyon’s photographs are in Museums and collections through out the world. His most recent one man show was at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. He regularly shows at the Edwynn Houk Gallery in NYC.

Oliver Rath

Ever since some creative know-it-all came up with this widespread witticism, saying “One Picture is Worth Ten Thousand Words”, the necessity to say anything about Oliver Rath is basically obsolete. Year of birth (78), place of birth (Heidelberg) – who cares about it anyway? His mover/shaker-mentality, his DJing-past, his talent to translate boredom of one thing into a passion for another one – it is all nice things to say about him, but you actually don’t need to know. His DIY-enthusiasm, that built up the whole technical foundation of his existence as a photographer, his mindscape that no school in this world could have teach him, his creative lunacy that’s hidden beneath this Frankish and easy going surface – they are all pretty ornaments for writings like these, but still: anything you could say about him doesn’t come close to the impression of his pictures.

Those are pictures of a maniac. His imagery is infiltrated by codes of urban hedonism, yet ruptured by sometimes prankish, sometimes caustic humour. It is a hard and rough picture language, a language without diplomatic attachments or compromise, but fuelled with unchecked temper and elegant to subtle sense for semantics. He takes everything in that makes a good picture: geometry, contrast, perspective, arrangement. But more than that, he’s a master of those little things, that push a good picture to become an outstanding one. He is the advocate of maximizing impacts. He’ll find the big talk even in the smallest gestures. He might just slam you in the face with a picture. But he might lick your wounds with the very next one. His sense for the right sentiment is without comparison, be it on national or international scale. Call him man of the moment. What do I say? Call him a depicting chronicler of the Zeitgeist. Well, why do I say so much anyway? Just find one of his pictures and call him your new favourite photographer.

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Eugeni Forcano

Eugeni Forcano entered the world of photography like a whirlwind, answering Josep Vergés and Néstor Luján’s invitation to joint the magazine Destino in 1960. Self-taught and intuitive, he gazed with wisdom, passion and irony at all around him. In 1964, Joan Perucho highlighted the human depths of Forcano’s work, whilst in 1966, Josep Pla, always sparing in this praise, said of him: “He is a great photographer, a great artist. He is different and unpredictable. Singular”. According to José Corredor–Matheos Forcano “makes us to see that reality is always surprising”. Forcano has the gift of anticipation. Andrés Trapiello insists that “the most important thing in his photographs is the beating of all that is still alive”, whilst Josep Maria Espinàs considers that “you can hear his characters speak”.

Photography marked Forcano’s life forever. An evolutionist and a dreamer, his career embraced different stages: fashion, illustration, symbolism… as well as painstaking research into colour as a new form of artistic expression. Jorge Rueda, writing about Forcano’s colour photography, congratulated him: “At last you have managed to photograph sighs”. Javier Pérez Andújar defines him as follows: “He is, more than an avant-garde photographer, a vitalist photographer who understands the language of his time”.

The facts would appear to confirm this. According to Josep Maria Huertas Claveria, Forcano is “one of the greatest photographers Catalonia has ever produced”.

Ferdinando Scianna

 

 

 



Ferdinando Scianna started taking photographs in the 1960s while studying literature, philosophy and art history at the University of Palermo. It was then that he began to photograph the Sicilian people systematically. Feste Religiose in Sicilia (1965) included an essay by the Sicilian writer Leonardo Sciascia, and it was the first of many collaborations with famous writers.

Scianna moved to Milan in 1966. The following year he started working for the weekly magazine L’Europeo, first as a photographer, then from 1973 as a journalist. He also wrote on politics for Le Monde Diplomatique and on literature and photography for La Quinzaine Littéraire.

In 1977 he published Les Siciliens in France and La Villa Dei Mostri in Italy. During this period Scianna met Henri Cartier-Bresson, and in 1982 he joined Magnum Photos. He entered the field of fashion photography in the late 1980s. At the end of the decade he published a retrospective, Le Forme del Caos (1989).

Scianna returned to exploring the meaning of religious rituals with Viaggio a Lourdes (1995), then two years later he published a collection of images of sleepers – Dormire Forse Sognare (To Sleep, Perchance to Dream). His portraits of the Argentinean writer Jorge Luis Borges were published in 1999, and in the same year the exhibition Niños del Mundo displayed Scianna’s images of children from around the world.

In 2002 Scianna completed Quelli di Bagheria, a book on his home town in Sicily, in which he tries to reconstruct the atmosphere of his youth through writings and photographs of Bagheria and the people who live there.

Humans, Haris Nukem

It’s undeniable that Haris Nukem‘s photos are their own brand of cool. These aren’t typical glamour shots of cookie-cutter models in pristine settings. Models are sometimes photographed in rooms among strewn clothing, casually posing in bathtubs, doing headstands in hallways, or interacting with other fashionably attractive counterparts. The aforementioned models Haris captures are interesting and beautifully flawed creatures who emit vibes of effortless badassery. Freckles, tattoos, iconic beards, body modifications, and piercing eyes are captured in exquisitely high contrast. But, it’s not only the ‘rad’ individuals that make these photos so stylistically memorable and captivating; it’s a combination of the lighting that’s employed and masterful retouching that make for a cinematic look. Haris definitely portrays a darker, grittier side to fashion photography and has a refreshing take on portraiture.

Below you’ll find Haris’ straightforward, reflective, mildly humorous (i.e. “Tiger-Style”) responses to Beautiful.bizarre’s interview questions. To see more of his work beyond here, follow him on various forms of social media where you’ll stay up to date with his upcoming projects (#breatheproject and #capsulecouples), calls for London-based models, and see more of his radiant photography along with comical quips.

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Lida Chaulet

A Dutch photographer having lived in the Netherlands for most of her life, while travelling abroad, from time to time. At age 10, she received her first camera as a first prize, resulting she carried her camera everywhere, becoming professional some years later.

She studied chemistry, math, computer sciences and programming languages. Her career has encompassed: chemical analyst, technical support engineer and as manager of an international computer help-desk. Recently she commenced a senior position for the Publicity & Promotion of a Lighting firm.

In 2004 she was asked for a few photography projects and this made her decide to study photography at the Fotovakschool in Apeldoorn (NL), specializing in Portrait and Fashion.

Horst P. Horst, Ruth Bernard, Jeanloup Sieff, Elliott Erwitt, André Kertész, Herb Ritts, and Robert Doisneau, amongst others, have influenced her professional views.

2007 was her start for capturing nudes, working with light to emphasize the beauty of the human form.

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Katsuji Fukuda

 

Born 1899 in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Fukuda moved to Tokyo in 1919 to work at Takachiho Seisakusho (now: Olympus Corporation). Following the Great Kanto Earthquake, he moved to Osaka. In 1926, he won the Ilford Diamond Prize at the “First Japanese Photography Art Exhibition.” The following year, his attempt to establish a photography museum in Sakai (Osaka) failed, but Fukuda continued to take photography such as still life and compositions under the influence of Bauhaus aesthetics. His series “Camera Diagnostics” (published in “Asahi Camera”, 1936) was well-received, and Fukuda thus compiled “How to Photograph Women,” and other instructional books on photography. After the war, he focused on nudes, publishing “Shell of Light” (Hikari no kaigara) in 1949.

While realism became the dominant current in photography, Fukuda never gave up on his own, unique approach. In 1955, he received funding from the Canon Photo Competition to travel to Italy, and published his photographs from Italy in the next year. Books on Kyoto, Ginza and Sumidagawa followed. Since the late 1950s, Fukuda also engaged in experimental photography. In 1970, his solo exhibition “Flowers and Nudes: Fukuda Katsuji Exhibition” was held at Takashimaya Department Store in Nihonbashi (Tokyo). Fukuda passed away in 1991, aged 92. His works are held at the Yokohama Museum of Art, the Kawasaki City Museum, the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the Yamaguchi Prefectural Museum of Art and others.

Raymond Depardon

 

 

 

 

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Raymond Depardon, born in France in 1942, began taking photographs on his family farm in Garet at the age of 12. Apprenticed to a photographer-optician in Villefranche-sur-Saône, he left for Paris in 1958.

He joined the Dalmas agency in Paris in 1960 as a reporter, and in 1966 he co-founded the Gamma agency, reporting from all over the world. From 1974 to 1977, as a photographer and film-maker, he covered the kidnap of a French ethnologist, François Claustre, in northern Chad. Alongside his photographic career, he began to make documentary films: 1974, Une Partie de Campagne and San Clemente.

In 1978 Depardon joined Magnum and continued his reportage work until the publication of Notes in 1979 and Correspondance New Yorkaise in 1981. In that same year, Reporters came out and stayed on the programme of a cinema in the Latin Quarter for seven months. In 1984 he took part in the DATAR project on the French countryside.

While still pursuing his film-making career, he received the Grand Prix National de la Photographie in 1991, but his films also won recognition: in 1995 his film Délits Flagrants, on the French justice system, received a César Award for best documentary, and in 1998 he undertook the first in a series of three films devoted to the French rural world. The Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris mounted an important exhibition of his work in 2000. The sequel to his work on French justice was shown as part of the official selection at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004.

As part of an initiative by the Fondation Cartier for contemporary art, Depardon made an installation of films on twelve large cities, shown in Paris, Tokyo and Berlin between 2004 and 2007. In 2006 he was invited to be artistic director of the Rencontres Internationales d’Arles. He is working on a photographic project on French territory which is due to be completed in 2010. He has made eighteen feature-length films and published forty-seven books.

Melodie McDaniel

Melodie McDaniel is a still life, celebrity, advertising photographer and film director.

Melodie’s first professional job was album artwork for Suzanne Vega, which received critical praise and led to further work with such musical artists as Smashing Pumpkins, Mazzy Star, Cat Power, Pharrell Williams, and Lily Allen. She went on to direct music videos, including clips for Annie Lennox, Blonde Redhead, Patti Smith, and Madonna. Melodie signed with The Directors Bureau in 2002. Melodie has since worked on spots for Chevy, Toyota, Vodafone, Zune, and Nike.

Melodie McDaniel continues to maintain a dual career in commercials/music videos and still photography.

Melodie McDaniel has shot editorially for Nylon Magazine, Giant Magazine, Elle, Vogue, Spin Magazine, Dazed & Confused, Interview, 10 Magazine, Jane Magazine, Details and Lula Magazine.

She has photographed celebrities including as Lily Allen, Ludacris, Pharrell Williams, Rihanna, Ryan Gosling, Carrie Underwood, Rob Machado, Robin Tunney.

She also the music video: “Carnival” with Natalie Merchant

Josef Breitenbach

 

 

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Josef Breitenbach was born on the 3rd of April 1896 into a middle-class wine-merchant family of Jewish descent. He attended technical high school from 1912–15 and trained as a salesman for an instrument firm and later as a book keeper for an insurance firm. He attended Ludwig-Maximillian University in Munich (philosophy and art history, 1914 to 1917) and became active in the Youth Section and later the Pacifist wing of the Social Democratic Party. In 1918, he took part in the Soviet-inspired Bavarian coup d’état, which was the first spark of the revolutionary fire that swept over Germany in the wake of the armistice. For a few months, Breitenbach also occupied an official position in the new government. Although the revolution was short-lived, the ties he forged with the radical circles of Munich’s intelligentsia later helped him establish his reputation as a photographer.

In 1932, after several unsuccessful years at the head of the family business—during which period he was mainly engaged with perfecting his use of a camera—Breitenbach opened his first photographic studio. His clients were prominent members of Munich’s bohemia, including actors and actresses performing in the Munich theater. Munich was a stronghold of libertarians and refined people, whose spirit Breitenbach captured in theatrical portraits of his friend, the journalist Theo Riegler. This world vanished in 1933 with Hitler’s takeover.

More than his Jewish roots, the photographer’s political past made him a target for persecution. In August, 1933, a band of Sturmabteilung (SA) storm troopers, members of Hitler’s private army, banged on the door of his studio. Using a portrait of German nobleman Franz von Papen he’d taken the year before when he was Chancellor of Germany, and a letter of thanks he’d received, Breitenbach convinced the troopers that he was under Papen’s protection. With his passport about to expire, Breitenbach made his way to France a few days later, joining other German exiles seeking refuge in Paris.

 The Surrealist “revolution” had by then become dominant in the Parisian art scene. Soon after his arrival, Breitenbach came into contact with André Breton and his circle. Preferring to retain his independence, he never became a member of the Surrealist group, but did show work in important exhibitions of Surrealist photography alongside Man Ray, Jacques-André Boiffard, Brassaï, Eli Lotar, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Roger Parry.

Breitenbach only lived in Paris for six years, until the war broke out in 1939. Yet during this period, he produced some of his most inventive work. He adopted several techniques favored by new photographers such as superimpression, montage, solarization, printing in negative, and the photogram. More importantly, he was one of the rare artists of the pre-War years to produce color photographs, which he did by using processes of bleaching, toning and pigmentation. Examples are the images “Montparnasse”, “Portrait of a Woman in Black and Red”, and Forever and Ever.

During his years in Paris, he was also an active member of the German exile community, which alerted the democratic world to the threat of fascism. He participated in the 1938 exhibition by the Union des Artistes Allemandes Libres, “Five Years of Hitler Dictatorship”. A high point for Breitenbach was his collaboration with Bertolt Brecht, summarized by portraits of the playwright. The war interrupted this second chapter of the photographer’s life. Interned by the French as a suspicious alien, then drafted into a civilian corps composed of foreigners, Breitenbach eventually escaped to New York from Marseille in 1941.

Breitenbach seemingly had no trouble adjusting to America. New York, the city in which he would spend the rest of his life, became home to him, as evidenced by his photomontage of 1942, “We New Yorkers”. He responded to the electric beat of the city, composing photographs such as “Radio City” (1942) that have a jazz-like quality.

 The 1950s and 1960s were years of intense activity for Breitenbach. He did photographic reportage in Asia for the United Nations and other varied businesses, documenting relief work. He exhibited his photographs extensively in the United States from the 1940s to the mid-1960s, including at the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The time not spent on the road was spent absorbed by his teaching at Cooper Union and The New School.

Since his death in New York on the 7th of October 1984, there have been 26 one person exhibitions of his work, shown in New York, Paris, Berlin, Munich, and multiple other locations in both Europe in the United States. Eight books have been published on his work, including two by Larissa Dryansky (Josef Breitenbach and Josef Breitenbach Manifesto) and Josef Breitenbach Photographien, published by Schirmer/Mosel. The Josef Breitenbach archive is located at the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, Tucso

Raquel Chicheri

Me guío bastante por el instinto, supongo que tengo una noción bastante clara del resultado a la hora de disparar, aunque no es nada programado, soy incapaz de organizar y planear con un mínimo de detalle una sesión de fotos.

Veo si me gusta lo que tengo delante, supongo que en ese momento mi cabeza empieza a trabajar con esquemas mentales de composición, y por supuesto también está presente el componente emocional de la imagen, uno de los motivos por lo que yo encuentro tan atractivas algunas imágenes que a otras personas pueden no sugerirle nada.

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Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks was an American photographer, musician, writer and film director. He is best remembered for his photographic essays for Life magazine and as the director of the 1971 film, Shaft.

Gordon Parks was one of the seminal figures of twentieth century photography. A humanitarian with a deep commitment to social justice, he left behind a body of work that documents many of the most important aspects of American culture from the early 1940s up until his death in 2006, with a focus on race relations, poverty, Civil Rights, and urban life. In addition, Parks was also a celebrated composer, author, and filmmaker who interacted with many of the most prominent people of his era—from politicians and artists to celebrities and athletes.

Born into poverty and segregation in Kansas in 1912, Parks was drawn to photography as a young man when he saw images of migrant workers published in a magazine. After buying a camera at a pawnshop, he taught himself how to use it and despite his lack of professional training, he found employment with the Farm Security Administration (F.S.A.), which was then chronicling the nation’s social conditions. Parks quickly developed a style that would make him one of the most celebrated photographers of his age, allowing him to break the color line in professional photography while creating remarkably expressive images that consistently explored the social and economic impact of racism.

When the F.S.A. closed in 1943, Parks became a freelance photographer, balancing work for fashion magazines with his passion for documenting humanitarian issues. His 1948 photo essay on the life of a Harlem gang leader won him widespread acclaim and a position as the first African American staff photographer and writer for Life Magazine, then by far the most prominent photojournalist publication in the world. Parks would remain at Life Magazine for two decades, chronicling subjects related to racism and poverty, as well as taking memorable pictures of celebrities and politicians (including Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and Stokely Carmichael). His most famous images, such as Emerging Man, 1952, and American Gothic, 1942, capture the essence of activism and humanitarianism in mid-twentieth century America and have become iconic images, defining their era for later generations. They also rallied support for the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement, for which Parks himself was a tireless advocate as well as a documentarian.

Parks spent much of the last three decades of his life expanding his style, conducting experiments with color photography. He continued working up until his death in 2006, winning numerous awards, including the National Medal of Arts in 1988, and over fifty honorary doctorates. He was also a noted composer and author, and in 1969, became the first African American to write and direct a Hollywood feature film based on his bestselling novel The Learning Tree. This was followed in 1971 by the hugely successful motion picture Shaft. The core of his accomplishment, however, remains his photography the scope, quality, and enduring national significance of which is reflected throughout the Collection. According to Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Center at Harvard University, “Gordon Parks is the most important black photographer in the history of photojournalism. Long after the events that he photographed have been forgotten, his images will remain with us, testaments to the genius of his art, transcending time, place and subject matter.”

Stefan Rappo

 

Stefan Rappo is the photographer of emotion. He creates refined and understated images free of embellishment or sophisticated staging. A return to the natural state and the primacy of emotions. With a cinematic allure, his images are like short films, silent and poetic – odes to women. Most striking is the calm and serenity. The spectator, although held at a distance, infiltrates the intimacy of the play, a huis-clos where the palpable tensions play off each other to create a narration.

At 30 years of age, Stefan Rappo left Switzerland and his job as a designer and constructor of heavy forestry equipment to pursue studies in a photography school in the south of France. He worked as a photo assistant for Camilla Akrans and Bruno Aveillan, and then for Peter Lindbergh, with whom he has worked for more than five years now. In parallel he works on his personal projects including staged cinematic photo-stories, female nudes, as well as more commercial work.

His shoots are meticulously planned, but once on set he gives free reign to spontaneity and liberty. Thus the essential elements and the emotions coalesce, creating life.

Philippe Guédon, Normal Magazine

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Frank Guiller

Photography for-tells stories synonymous with our own primal, intrinsic desires to dive in and implicate, merge, and experience our external environments. The pause that holds us silently whilst observing opens doors that capture untold stories only we could conquer. Images filter constructs of rapacious emotional rapture. Visual stimulation impacts the exploration of the psyche through the processes of association thus hurdling emotions, voyeurism, pity, rage , lament. All of these perhaps, visionary in one stillness. A pause conveying all possibility. Rank Uiller

Emotions à Nu, Joana Choumali

 

“Being naked this is nothing to hide, It is not even need words because the body speaks for itself. “Victor Lévy Beaulieu “Emotions à nu ” is a serie of female portraits without a face. As the “naked truth”, human, beautiful unadorned, without makeup. Women are plural, fragile and strong. This work is an intimate journey, an emotional state to another, a quiet quest towards physical self-acceptance and serenity.

EMOTIONS A NU – 2013

Berlín, Martin U Waltz

 

 

Martin’s work is about the human element in urban space. He explores the underlying emotions in the city between existential angst, boredom and joy. Martin is a keen observer of the fragility and transiency in urban life. In his street photography Martin emphasizes the contrast between the soft fluid human shape and the hard and static fabric of city infrastructure. Martin uses strong geometrical compositions, still he thinks of his photography as associative and poetic.

His work draws inspiration from many sources beyond the world of photography: literature with the work of J.P. Sartre, Paul Bowles and Michel Houellebecq, painting between Rembrandt, Hopper and Penck, poetry with Baudelaire, Benn and Celan, movies from “The Third Man” to the work of Jim Jarmush and Wong Kar-wai and the recent “Victoria” and tv series like “The Wire” and “Fargo”.

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Pieter Hugo












Pieter Hugo is a photographic artist living in Cape Town. Major museum solo exhibitions have taken place at The Hague Museum of Photography, Musée de l’Elysée in Lausanne, Ludwig Museum in Budapest, Fotografiska in Stockholm, MAXXI in Rome and the Institute of Modern Art Brisbane, among others. Hugo has participated in numerous group exhibitions at institutions including Tate Modern, the Folkwang Museum, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, and the São Paulo Bienal. His work is represented in prominent public and private collections, among them the Museum of Modern Art, V&A Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art, J Paul Getty Museum, Walther Collection, Deutsche Börse Group, Folkwang Museum and Huis Marseille. Hugo received the Discovery Award at the Rencontres d’Arles Festival and the KLM Paul Huf Award in 2008, the Seydou Keita Award at the Rencontres de Bamako African Photography Biennial in 2011, and was shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012.