Afghan, Zoran Marinovic

A long, dusty avenue takes you from the airport to the center of Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan. Although the road was renovated by the international community only a couple of months ago, our vehicle manages to hit a hole every couple of minutes. There are many holes on this half hour drive. The shield of the transporter vehicles bleeps on each site where a car-bomb exploded, and there lies the unmarked grave of a suicide bomber. Surprise attacks, numerous casualties, disbelief and fear, are the only signposts on this tiresome avenue today. When peace becomes reality and then vanishes. Where does God come to cry?

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Serge Chriqui

The notion that photography captures a single, specific moment in time – no matter how fleeting – has always held great appeal for me. The endeavour requires observing my surroundings, wherever I may be, while ‘chasing the light fantastic’. That endeavour, for me, is an intuitive one: from the gut, as it were… Never knowing what I will find, I let the scenes reveal themselves one at a time, as photographic opportunities so often do… I travel to photograph! Discovering new places and surroundings add fuel to a burning passion for photographing the world around me. In the end, my photography strives to be art – always attempting to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary! It won’t usually be mistaken for documentary, commercial or other types of photography – it aims to be an artistic glimpse at the world through my lens.

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The Longings of the Others, Sandra Hoyn

Bangladesh is one of the few Muslim countries where prostitution in registered brothels is legal. The Kandapara brothel in Tangail is the oldest and one of the largest, it has existed for some 200 years. It has been demolished in 2014 but has been established again with the help of local NGOs. Here live and work more than 700 sex workers with their children and their madams. Most of the women were either trafficked or born inside the brothel and secure in this way their livelihood. Their customers are police men, politics, farmers, fishermen, factory workers, groups of teenage boys.

The brothel district is surrounded by a two meter wall. In the narrow streets there are food stalls, tee shops and street vendors. The brothel is a place with its own rules and hierarchies which are often completely different from the mainstream society. The most vulnerable stage is when a young woman enters the brothel – she is called a bonded girl. Officially, they must be 18 years old, but most of them are underage. Bonded girls are usually 12 to 14 years old. They have no freedom or rights. They belong to a madam, have debts and are not allowed to go outside or keep their money. From the moment that a woman has paid her debts, she is free to leave the brothel. But these women are socially stigmatized outside and tolerated only in these brothel areas, so they to stay and continue supporting their families with their earnings.

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Dennis Cox

Dennis Cox is an award winning travel photographer who has photographed in over 100 countries on all seven continents. He markets his stock photography from his own agency, ChinaStock/WorldViews, as well as through Alamy, Getty Images, ImageBrief, and other outlets worldwide.

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Martin Chamberlain

I am a photographer based in London, UK. Many of the images on this website have featured in exhibitions around the world, including Australia, Nepal, Qatar, Austria, Italy, Czech Republic, Luxemburg and the UK. They have also featured in numerous magazines and books on travel photography.

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Nils Jorgensen

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Sengo Pérez

Sengo Pérez da Silva, nacido en Melo, Uruguay, en 1961 es un fotografo uruguayo. Reportero gráfico profesional desde 1982, ha publicando en Semanario Brecha y diarios La República y El Observador (Uruguay) Revistas Veja e Isto é (Brasil) y Boston Globe (EE.UU.) En 1989 se radico en Brasil trabajando para los diarios O Estado de Sao Paulo y Jornal da Tarde. Desde 1990 en Perú como editor gráfico de suplementos en Página Libre, El Suplemento (diario Expreso), diarios Gestión, El Sol, Correo y las revistas deportivas Don Balón y El Gráfico. Productor periodístico de televisión en los canales América TV, canal 4 Y ATV, canal 9. Colaboraciones para las agencias Reuters, Associated Press, France Presse, EFE, la cadena de periódicos KRT (EE.UU.) Bild (Alemania), Houston Chronicle (EE.UU.), UNICEF, y las revistas Rumbos y Somos (El Comercio).

Ibarionex Perello

 

Ibarionex Perello is a photographer, writer, educator and host of The Candid Frame Photography podcast. He has over 25 years of experience in the photographic industry.

In his role as host and producer of The Candid Frame, he provides frank, insightful interviews with some of the industry’s top established and emerging photographers. The popular show has featured guests including Jay Maisel, Joel Meyerowitz, Pete Turner, Lynn Goldsmith and Gerd Ludwig and enjoys a following among photo enthusiasts from all over the world. The weekly program is consistently ranked among the top programs of its type.

Ibarionex is also the author of 5 books including: Chasing the Light: Improving Your Photography Using Available Light, 5D Mark III From Snapshot to Great Shots, and Adobe Master Class: Photoshop. He is also the co-author of Visual Stories: Behind the Len with Vincent Laforet and Road to Seeing with Dan Winters.

His photographs and articles have appeared in numerous publications and websites including Digital Photo Pro, Outdoor Photographer, Rangefinder, Shutterbug, Popular Photography, DP Review and Scott Kelby’s Light It magazines.

He an adjunct professor at the Art Center College of Design as well as an instructor at the online photography school, Better Photo.

Debbie Caffery

Caffery has been making photographs of the people and culture of her native Louisiana for over 30 years. Past projects include documentation of sugarcane field and mill workers, alligator hunting, and family portraits in Louisiana, as well as photographs of rural Mexico and Portugal. She will soon publish a new book documenting prostitution in Mexico. Caffery’s work has been included in solo exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, Cleveland Museum of Art, Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Photography, and the Gitterman Gallery, New York.

She has received numerous awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship (2005), the first Lou Stoumen Prize (1996), and the Louisiana Governor’s Art Award (1990). Her work is included in the permanent collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian Institution, Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the New Orleans Museum of Art. Caffery has published several highly praised books, including Polly, The Shadows, and Carry Me Home.

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Rennie Ellis

Rennie Ellis, photographer and author, who with his images and words has taunted, titillated and tickled our collective fancies for years, has left behind a treasure trove of over half a million images spanning over three decades.

Ellis’ photography has concentrated on documenting both popular culture and the demi-monde and examining Australia as a hedonistic society. In his own intuitive way he was committed to capturing on film those moments in time that offer insights into the human condition.

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Dina Oganova

Sakartvelo is my home country and I‘m very happy and proud that I was born and raised up here.

It’s a very small but country with a big heart.

Population is around 4 millions people, which 1/3 prefer to live in capital – Tbilisi.

Located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe.

It is bounded to the west by the Black Sea ,to the north by Russia ,to the south by Turkey and Armenia and to the southeast by Azerbaijan.

Georgia is one of the 15 republics of the formerly USSR.

After break up the Soviet Union (1991) it became independent.

There are a lot of refugees because of the civil war(1992) and war with Russia(2008)

We lost our paradise parts of country ( Abkhazia and South Ossetia)..

Since the war, breakaway regions are under Russian occupation, but legally they are still part of Georgia.

Russia recognized Abkhazia and South Ossetia as independent countries.

People in Georgia are very traditional.

We have a lots of tradition holidays, especially religious holidays in different part of Georgia.

About 80% of the population are Orthodox .

Georgia is something special for me and it’s always hard to explain with words .

It’s a biggest love, pain and happiness at the same time, fresh air and new sounds, real people with real stories around, friends and family album ,red wine, mountains and waves, beautiful dance and smell of the past ,magic …It’s a dreamland.

I Am Georgia” is my life project .

Arnold Newman

 

Arnold Newman is acknowledged as one of the great masters of the 20th and 21st century and his work has changed portraiture. He is recognized as the “Father of Environmental Portraiture.” His work is collected and exhibited in the major museums around the world including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Chicago Art Institute; The Los Angeles Museum of Art; The Philadelphia Museum; The Tate and the National Portrait gallery, London; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and many other prominent museums in Europe, Japan, South America, Australia, etc.

Newman was an important contributor to publications such as New York, Vanity Fair, LIFE, Look, Holiday, Harper’s Bazaar, Esquire, Town and Country, Scientific American, New York Times Magazine, and many others. There are numerous books published of Newman’s work in addition to countless histories of photography, catalogues, articles and television programs. He received many major awards by the leading professional organizations in the U.S. and abroad including the American Society of Media Photographers, The International Center of Photography, The Lucie Award, The Royal Photographic Society Centenary Award as well as France’s “Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters.” In 2005, Photo District News named Newman as one of the 25 most influential living photographers. In 2006, Newman was awarded The Gold Medal for Photography by The National Arts Club. He is the recipient of nine honorary doctorates and has lectured and conducted workshops throughout the country and the world.

Arnold Newman died on June 6, 2006 in New York City. He was 88 years old.

Nicolás Muller

 

My life in color, Raquel Chicheri

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Body Talks, Anka Zhuravleva

Anka was born on December 4, 1980. She spent her childhood with books on art and her mothers’ drawing tools, covering acres of paper with her drawings. In 1997 she entered the Moscow Architectural Institute deciding to follow in her mothers’ footsteps. But at the end of 1997 her mother was diagnosed with cancer and died in less that a year. Then her father died in 1999.

After that Anka’s life changed dramatically. In attempt to keep sane, she plunged into an alternative lifestyle – working as a tattoo artist, singing in a rock-band, sometimes looking for escape in alcohol. In order to make a living while studying, Anka worked at several modeling agencies. Thanks to the drawing lessons she wasn’t afraid to pose nude, and her photos appeared in the Playboy and XXL magazines and at the Playboy 1999 photo exhibition. But she was not looking for a modeling career – it was just a way to make some money.

In 2001 Anka was working in the post-production department at the Mosfilm StudiosThat same winter one of her colleagues invited her to spend a week-end in Saint-Petersburg with his friend, composer and musician Alexander Zhuravlev. In less than a month Anka said farewell to Moscow, her friends, her Mosfilm career and moved in with Alexander in Saint-Petersburg. Living with her loved one healed her soul, and she regained the urge for painting. She made several graphic works and ventured into other areas of visual arts. In 2002 Gavriil Lubnin, the famous painter and her husband’s friend, showed her the oil painting technique, which she experimented with for the following several years. During that period she made just a few works because each one required unleashing of a serious emotional charge. All those paintings are different as if created by different people.

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Frank Eugene

Frank Eugene Smith, who was later known by his artist name Frank Eugene and who adopted German citizenship in 1906, was born in New York in 1865. After a first training at the City College, Eugene began to study painting in New York in 1884 and switched to the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich in 1886. During his years of study Eugene began to be interested in the new media of photography and studied further autodidactically. As soon as 1889 Eugene had his first one-man show at the Camera-Club’ in New York, which was founded by Alfred Stieglitz. After his graduation Eugene returned to New York in 1894 and worked for some years as a stage designer and portrait painter, specialising in portraying well-known theatre-actors. Since 1900 he lived in Germany again and got envolved with artistic photography, was admitted to the Linked ring’ in London and founded – together with Stieglitz and Edward Steichen – the American photographer’s society Photo-Session’. Between 1904 and 1910 Eugene’s works were published as heliographs in the advanced photography journal Camera Work’ and became internationally known. Eugene orientated himself in his photographs at painting, following the romanticising style of art photography: Eugene’s treatment of the negatives with opaque colours and etching needle led to his wanted pictorial and graphic effects and with his favoured techniques like platinum print and the rubber-bichrome.technique, he achieved the modern blur of his positives. Since 1907 Eugene began his educational work at the Lehr-und Versuchsanstalt für Fotographie in Munich, which he continued at his chair for artistic photography at the Königliche Akademie für Grafische Künste in Leipzig in 1913. In 1907 Eugene organised a meeting between Stieglitz, Steichen and Heinrich Kühn and brought forward the assimilation of German art photographers to American guidelines. Frank Eugene died in Munich in 1936.

Ambrotypes, Serge Romanov

For more than a century and a half one of the most fascinating novel that is the history of the Russian photography has been written. . Nowadays the events of the novel unfold in the decoration of various historical epoch, every one of them are seen through the eyes of the avowed masters of photography who honour the experience of their predecessors. The young generation longing for ultimate freedom also create using and analyzing the previous achievements in the area. Undoubtedly, books, the internet and a great number of seminars and master-classes give the opportunity to anybody to learn the experience of the previous masters of photography. However, how often do photographers address to it in daily practice?

Throughout history people have been eager for fairy tales, romantic and fantastic stories you could hardly believe. A fairy tale is mystery, that cannot be revealed by any any teller, but only those of them who believe in and see…To see what is hidden in the unreal world of the fairy tale, to see love that makes our real world be not empty . The basis for invention of the photography is said to be the observation of the famous Greek scientist Aristotle. In the sixth century BC he described unusual phenomena of the light going through small hole in the window shutter that painted the landscape on the wall that was seen behind the window. Thus, long before the appearance of the first shot the process of developing into the light was defined as mystery.

A piece of art is born not among theatrical scenery, but in the photographic studio where every object is functional. You can realize the magic of the space only after seeing what is being born here. There are no unnecessary objects in the studio of the Moscow photographer Serge Romanov , though everything from the antic wooden cameras ( repaired, in perfect working condition) and old optical devices till the characters who visit the place resemble the first frames of cult movie “ The Phantom of the Opera.” Once forgotten, gone out chandelier flashes out again and the world comes to life with genuine colors. The history of the studio of Serge Romanov started when “ the photography captivated him as a kind of art.” According to his words, it happened 25 years ago. It was simply interesting to capture what he saw around. There were neither camera nor films, nor money to develop and print films. His first camera was his own eyes.

Then there were photo-shoots for the most prestigious glossy magazines such as Playboy, XXL, and works for such companies as ТНТ, Vnukovo Airlines, FashionTV,Rive Gauche, FHM, STSTV, MuzTV and some others. He was recognized and was invited to a number of countries to give masterclasses and exhibited his work in the most famous art galleries in the world. That really attracted him until he realized how expendable this kind of work could be. Adverts and glossy prints are interesting and important only for the period of time of a magazine’s latest publication or an advertising campaign’s launching, in other words for one or two weeks. This sort of work is performed collectively and the proverb goes that too many cooks spoil the broth. Most of these works are boring and unvaried.

You are unlikely to have heard the word ambrotype unless you have devoted your life to photography. In the middle of the nineteen century it was the invention of the ambrotype that made photography more popular and available. Then, in March 1851, the Englishman Frederic Scott Archer delivered a report on wet collodion process in photography at the Royal Scientific Society in Great Britain and at the Paris Academy of Science. Archer called the wet plate collodion process ambrotype . The ambrotype means immortal image in the ancient Greek.

The ambrotype as a fairy tale can be created only when you trust in it. Serge Romanov came into the world of the ambrotype mysterious way. He has become one of the best professional in this area and he doesn’t care about his being popular and only sometimes agrees to exhibit his works as he doesn’t want turn his art into commodity. Serge Romanov remarked that the ambrotype came into his life as a sort of protest against the glossy emasculating picture. Only after some time had passed he realized that the wet collodion process had an indirect relation to photography as the ambrotype was an artifact. That’s why working with such an image means creation of an artifact. It might have been at that exact moment when he understood that he had grown into an artist. As for his style, he admitted he didn’t know or he might be afraid to utter it aloud, supposing that as soon as he does it he loses it.

The photo shots of Serge Romanov are easily recognized, even by those ones who don’t know the name of the photographer and are unaware of the wet collodion method. His photo-shots are argued about, they are referred to, copied and posted on the profile at the social websites. Also there are videos with his interview and lectures where he mentions masters who has influenced his art , they are Pieter Bruegel, Lucas Cranach, Giorgione and Baldassarre Peruzzi, Hans Rudolf Giger and Zdzisław Beksiński and others. Serge Romanov called himself a simple observer with a camera and when opening the camera shutter he simply waited for a miracle to come and it did at the end.

Following the rules of the told fairy-tale, Romanov confirmed them, saying, that the best thing that could have happened to photography was that it became available to everybody. It stopped belonging to a narrow circle of swaggering people looking like possessing some sacred knowledge. A number of nice photos didn’t increase after that, but a nice photo was distinctive in the swarm.

The creation of the ambrotype by Romanov is the sacrament comparing with the masquerade farfetched performance of those who are in pursuit of fame. Possessing only superficial knowledge about the process of taking pictures photographers commercialize the thing. They are interested in presentation, not in the process of creation. The debates about commercialized epatage of modern photographers won’t come down but occupying pages of more than half released article and reviews. Nevertheless, people are eager for fairy tales. People believe in artless words of those who knows that the main mystery is love.

Serge Romanov supposes that a photo itself cannot be evaluated. He takes into consideration a certain style of life of the personality, the way of giving oneself up to business and what it results in. In conclusion, we would like to say that his works seem to become the chapter of the history of the Russian philosophy where the window is the light anyway.

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Boris Davidov

Fernando Lemos

 

Fernando Lemos is a painter, graphic artist and photographer from Portugal.

Early in his career, in 1960 , Fernando Lemos, photographer from Portugal, is participating in intellectual resistance movement against the dictatorship of Salazar. His Production is experimental, close to the experimental nature inspired by work of Man Ray.

He came in Brazil and lived in the Pension Maua , in Rio de Janeiro, where he photographs writers and artists. In 1953 , some of his photos are display at the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo – MAM / SP [ Museum of Modern Art of São Paulo ] and the Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro – MAM / RJ [ Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro ] . His works resemble those of modern Brazilian photographers of the late 1940s, related to Foto Cine Clube Bandeirante [Photo Film Club Bandeirante] .

Fernando Lemos still working with construction techniques and organization of space , as in Luz Teimosa [ Stubborn Light ] , 1951/1952 , where the light is revealed in lines that intersect , in a subtle way , an atmosphere confined . The brief period during which he devoted himself more intensely to photography ends shortly after his arrival in Brazil. He began to work with drawing and painting and produces non- figurative works . He first uses shapes cut out the background , often close to graphic signs in compositions mainly structured by line , as in Símbolos [ Symbols ] , 1967. In other works , he uses geometry as an expressive form , and also creates organic forms evoking symbols. It also explores the luminosity of watercolor.

Fernando Lemos also works with visual communication and graphic planning, and as an illustrator for several publications. With Décio Pignatari (1927) , he led the design studio Maitiry in São Paulo. His design work is still not well known

René Maltête

The name René Maltête is meaningless to most of us, since we don’t often look behind the camera, but he literally altered the way photography was handled, changing the game for good and all. He grew up in the 30’s and 40’s, when most pictures were taken of staid men in severe suits looking sorely unhappy as they stared into the lens of these photographic contraptions, trying not to blur the resultant images. Photos of the era were commonly staged, with little humanity. They were largely glamour shots or grim photos taken for utility. There wasn’t much personality to them, and they certainly weren’t funny. Then came the work of René.

As time progressed and more people could get access to cameras, the technology also became more mobile and less difficult to take out into the world, where life could be more aptly captured outside of staged shoots. Candid photography began to take off, and Maltête decided he wanted to show the hilarity of the human condition, so he made street photos that were odd, quirky, and often gut-busting. Meme-makers of today and those who devise “When You See It…” lists have nothing on the masterwork of this light-bending genius.