Ly Hoang Long

 

Since my childhood, I was fascinated by colors and images, then I began my first career as a graphic designer. Life passed smoothly until 1993, when I saw some of my friend’s photos, which made me realize that I could paint with light by a camera, so I bought my first SLR (Pentax SP II) and started shooting. In 1995 I built up my darkroom and got stuck there for eight years, I didn’t even realize that I almost quit my design job. It is the story of how a photo hobbyist transforms to a freelance photographer.

In my opinion,  the technique and concept of photography might be changed from time to time, but the only thing will always exist and will never change is our optimistic vision. Life is always looked much better while being seen via the view finder, so, just press the button and let the images tell the stories.

LÊ QUANG CHÂU

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The Vietnam War, Eddie Adams

The photojournalist Eddie Adams, who covered the Vietnam War for the Associated Press, not only captured the action and chaos but took the time to get up close to the Vietnamese people whenever he could. In 1968, he undertook a project called “Hands of a Nation,” taking intimate photos of the hands of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians. Their hands were busy doing so many things then: reaching out for medicine, grasping weapons, straining against bindings, soothing, praying, rebuilding. Adams photographed hands young and old, belonging to the healthy and the wounded, the living and the dead

The Vietnam War, Horst Faas

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Fifty years ago, in March 1965, 3,500 U.S. Marines landed in South Vietnam. They were the first American combat troops on the ground in a conflict that had been building for decades. The communist government of North Vietnam (backed by the Soviet Union and China) was locked in a battle with South Vietnam (supported by the United States) in a Cold War proxy fight. The U.S. had been providing aid and advisors to the South since the 1950s, slowly escalating operations to include bombing runs and ground troops. By 1968, more than 500,000 U.S. troops were in the country, fighting alongside South Vietnamese soldiers as they faced both a conventional army and a guerrilla force in unforgiving terrain. Each side suffered and inflicted huge losses, with the civilian populace suffering horribly. Based on widely varying estimates, between 1.5 and 3.6 million people were killed in the war. This photo essay, part one of a three-part series, looks at the earlier stages of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, as well as the growing protest movement, between the years 1962 and 1967

Maika Elan

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Justin Mott

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Hoang Giang Hai

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