Pei Ketron

Pei Ketron is a photographer, educator, speaker, and traveler based in San Francisco. Pei was born in Taiwan and raised on the Navajo Nation in Arizona as part of a biracial household. As a child, she spent summers enduring the monsoons of the tropics and the remainder of the year running barefoot in the deserts of the American southwest.

After a decade teaching special education in the public school system, Pei now teaches photography classes privately and through companies such as Skillshare, Edelman, The Compelling Image, Creative Live, and the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops. She also serves as a photographic mentor for travel experiences with companies such as Passion Passport and has spoken at events such as SXSW, Altitude Summit, and Start Conference. In addition to her experience with DSLR and medium-format film photography, Pei is also an accomplished mobile photographer, having amassed a following of nearly a million users on Instagram, and was selected to be a part of the Shot on iPhone 6 campaign.

Pei specializes in commercial, travel, and humanitarian work worldwide. Clients include: Adobe, American Express, Apple, All Nippon Airways, Bloomingdale’s, Canadian Tourism Commission, Discover Tasmania, Jordan Tourism Board, Mercedes, Michael Kors, NewYork.com, Pfizer, Save the Children, Square, Starwood Hotels, Tourism Whitsundays, Travel Alberta, Travel & Leisure Magazine, Turkish Airlines, and UNICEF.

Chang Chao-Tang

Chao-Tang Chang born in1943 November 17 in Panchiao City, Taipei County, Taiwan. Chang Chao-Tang is Taiwan’s most representative photographer. During the 1960s, in the conservative society of Taiwan, Chang Chao-Tang was a college student, profoundly moved and influenced by the social realist works in literature and surrealist painting. He published a series of absurd works that expressed his sense of ridiculousness and desolation. These included the works “Blurriness”, “White powder on peoples’ faces”, “Figure without a head”, and “Shaken-up image of the body”. He found the camera a direct way to relieve his oppression as well as release his rebellious energy. His unique style made a great impression on Taiwanese photography, and he not only had exhibitions at home but also received international appreciation. In 2013, he had his first major retrospective exhibition in the Taipei Fine Art Museum.