Luc Forsyth 

Luc Forsyth a Canadian cinematographer and photographer with a strong background journalism and in documentary storytelling.
After living and working in Asia and Latin American for over ten years, Luc returned to Canada where he now lives in Vancouver, BC. He works on everything that involves visual storytelling, including commercials, high-end documentaries, narrative films, and music videos, but is perhaps best known for stories that reflect the grittiness of the real world.
Luc’s video and stills clients The New York Times, The National Geographic Channel, Netflix, Channel 4, ShowTime, HBO, ES
PN, Quibi, and many others. Luc has also partnered extensively with non-profit organizations such as Handicap International, The United Nations Population Fund, CARE International, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and The Gapminder Foundation. Commercial clients include Cadillac, Marie Claire, Jaguar, Tourism Vancouver, and Tentree Apparel.

Mike Grandmaison

Mike Grandmaison is an acclaimed Canadian photographer and widely recognized as one of Canada’s fine nature photographers. He is passionate about creating exquisite images that reflect the beauty of his beloved country Canada. His award-winning images have been featured in some of the world’s finest publications, as well as in a wide array of books, cards, calendars and postage stamps. Passionate about photography and the natural world, Mike is known for creating unique images that reflect the natural beauty and diversity of Canada. Growing up on the vast Canadian Shield, a professional background in biology, a decades-long career in biological sciences, and a lifelong curiosity in physical geography have all contributed to the impressive, evocative body of work he has become known for. With camera in hand, Mike has explored literally the breadth of his beloved country Canada for 45 years

 

Daniel Castonguay

In 1979, as a member of a youth association, I had to choose an activity for the upcoming session. Naturally interested in science and experimentation, photography seemed a very fascinating activity since I could have access to a dark room and improve my knowledge in that particular field, I then discovered that photography was an endless source of learning. We were a group of audacious youngsters who wanted to learn. However, since the resources were limited to the few books left in the lab, we still managed to get by with the trial and error method and personally, it is still an integral part of the photographer’s work even today.

Our working methods of the time did not really have a technical framework and limits, the technical words and the specific methods of creation were totally unknown to us, the only known basis was the essential, how to finish a roll and how to finish a photo purely for black and white imaging.

Personally, even in those years, I did not like to depict things as they were and especially in street photography where the imaging must follow strict rules. This naivety and candor allowed us to be creative to the point of creating overlays that could be used in a dark room. A plate of glass over the paper and various translucent materials were added on the glass as long as the light could pass through, not to mention our motley techniques for dodging, burning, sabattier effect, multiple exposure and so. And that’s how my fascination with textures and post-production started

Carlos and Jason Sanchez


Carlos and Jason Sanchez (Carlos Born 1976 and Jason 1981 in Montreal ) are Canadian fine art photographers known for their large-scale dramatic images. Thematically, their work centers on the psychological reflections of their subjects, and encourages the viewer to interact with the work by filling in the details in the open-ended scenes depicted. In their earlier work the Sanchez brothers depended on their pictures appearing to be part of a larger narrative, like a film still, to create narrative tension. Their later work still incorporates narrative threads, but has developed to into more of a story within a scene format.

Olivier Du Tre

Olivier Du Tré is a fine art photographer based out of Calgary, Alberta.
After graduating as a graphic designer in 1998, Du Tré found his passion after enrolling in a three-year photography program at KISP in Ghent, Belgium. During this time, Olivier immersed himself in film cameras, darkroom printing techniques and black and white photography, all of which continue to play a huge role in his work today.

After seven years of traveling back and forth, Olivier decided to make Canada his permanent home in 2009.

“The move was a product of passion. I wanted to be closer to the subject matter that I found so intriguing. The majestic Rocky Mountains on one side, and the wide open spaces of the Prairies on the other. I really like the compliment/contradiction of man and nature. There’s a unique symmetry to it all.”

Michel Gravel

Menonitas, Larry Towell

Larry Towell’s business card reads ‘Human Being’. Experience as a poet and a folk musician have done much to shape his personal style. The son of a car repairman, Towell grew up in a large family in rural Ontario, Canada. During studies in visual arts at Toronto’s York University, he was given a camera and taught how to process black and white film.
A stint of volunteer work in Calcutta in 1976 provoked Towell to photograph and write. Back in Canada, he taught folk music to support himself and his family. In 1984, he became a freelance photographer and writer focusing on the dispossessed, exile and peasant rebellion. He completed projects on the Nicaraguan Contra war, on the relatives of the disappeared in Guatemala, and on American Vietnam War veterans who had returned to Vietnam to rebuild the country. His first published magazine essay, Paradise Lost, exposed the ecological consequences of the catastrophic Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska’s Prince William Sound. He became a Magnum nominee in 1988 and a full member in 1993.
In 1996, Towell completed a project based on ten years of reportage in El Salvador, followed the next year by a major book, Then Palestine. His fascination with landlessness also led him to the Mennonite migrant workers of Mexico, an eleven-year project completed in 2000.
With the help of the inaugural Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, he finished a second highly acclaimed book on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in 2005, and in 2008 released the award-winning The World From My Front Porch, a project on his own family in rural Ontario where he sharecrops a 75-acre farm.

Larry Towell

Larry Towell’s business card reads ‘Human Being’. Experience as a poet and a folk musician has done much to shape his personal style. The son of a car repairman, Towell grew up in a large family in rural Ontario. During studies in visual arts at Toronto’s York University, he was given a camera and taught how to process black and white film.
A stint of volunteer work in Calcutta in 1976 provoked Towell to photograph and write. Back in Canada, he taught folk music to support himself and his family. In 1984 he became a freelance photographer and writer focusing on the dispossessed, exile and peasant rebellion. He completed projects on the Nicaraguan Contra war, on the relatives of the disappeared in Guatemala, and on American Vietnam War veterans who had returned to Vietnam to rebuild the country. His first published magazine essay, ‘Paradise Lost’, exposed the ecological consequences of the catastrophic Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska’s Prince William Sound. He became a Magnum nominee in 1988, and a full member in 1993.
In 1996 Towell completed a project based on ten years of reportage in El Salvador, followed the next year by a major book on the Palestinians. His fascination with landlessness also led him to the Mennonite migrant workers of Mexico, an eleven-year project completed in 2000. With the help of the inaugural Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, he finished a second highly acclaimed book on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in 2005, and in 2008 released the award-winning The World From My Front Porch, a project on his own family in rural Ontario where he sharecrops a 75 acre farm.

Michel Gravel

Gallery

Serge Chriqui

The notion that photography captures a single, specific moment in time – no matter how fleeting – has always held great appeal for me. The endeavour requires observing my surroundings, wherever I may be, while ‘chasing the light fantastic’. That endeavour, for me, is an intuitive one: from the gut, as it were… Never knowing what I will find, I let the scenes reveal themselves one at a time, as photographic opportunities so often do… I travel to photograph! Discovering new places and surroundings add fuel to a burning passion for photographing the world around me. In the end, my photography strives to be art – always attempting to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary! It won’t usually be mistaken for documentary, commercial or other types of photography – it aims to be an artistic glimpse at the world through my lens.

Home

Pueblos sin retrato, François Mouries

Home

Michael Woloszynowicz

I’m a fashion, beauty and portrait photographer and retoucher based out of Toronto, Canada

In addition to creating images, I have a love for teaching and do so through a variety avenues. I provide a comprehensive set of free tutorials on my YouTube channel and am also an instructor at Retouching Academy and RGG EDU, as well as a Staff Writer at Fstoppers.

My work has been featured in a wide variety of international fashion and photography publications and syndicated TV shows including Maxim Mexico, Maxim Columbia, Maxim India, Maxim Indonesia, Factice, Point Seven Mach and many others.

Home

Doug Caplan

With a photographic career spanning over 20 years, Doug has been focused at producing monochromatic photographic artworks that approach a wide scale of subjects. His work is often presented in a multi-layered way, with an overt attempt to challenge the viewer.

By applying digital alterations and subtle abstraction concepts, Doug investigates the dynamics of landscape, architecture & urban environments, including the manipulation and his personal interpretations of the subject captured. Rather than presenting a factual reality, an illusion is fabricated to conjure the realms of our imagination.

Doug’s photography directly responds to the surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences from the artist as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that go un-noticed

Home

Doug Caplan


With a photographic career spanning over 20 years, Doug has been focused at producing monochromatic photographic artworks that approach a wide scale of subjects. His work is often presented in a multi-layered way, with an overt attempt to challenge the viewer.

By applying digital alterations and subtle abstraction concepts, Doug investigates the dynamics of landscape, architecture & urban environments, including the manipulation and his personal interpretations of the subject captured. Rather than presenting a factual reality, an illusion is fabricated to conjure the realms of our imagination.

Doug’s photography directly responds to the surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences from the artist as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that go un-noticed

Boris Ovini

 

 

boris-ovini_fashionproduction_1

 

 Home

Guardar

Larry Towell

Source
Magnum Photos

Aislinn Leggett

Aislinn Leggett was born in Namur, QC in 1981 and currently lives and works in Montreal, Canada. She was a grant recipient from Conseils des arts et lettres du Quebec in 2008 for her project Lost Faces. That same year, she was featured in Applied Arts Magazine’s emerging artist Young Blood showcase. Her first solo show, Eight Seconds, The Quebec Rodeos was exhibited at various galleries throughout Quebec in 2008 and her work has been published in The Morning News, Burn Magazine, Urbania, among others. Recently, her work was nominated in the fine art category at the New York Photo Festival 2009, she participated in the group exhibit Likeness for the Ottawa Karsh Festival 2009 and in the Daniel Cooney Fine Art Emerging Artist auction in New York. In 2010, she will be showing in a group exhibition at Gallery 44 Center for Contemporary Photography in Toronto.

She is also the editor and curator of Slightly Lucid, a contemporary photography blog that showcases the works of emerging and established artists.

The kitsch destruction of our world, Benoit Paillé

 

Home

Claire Beaugrand-Champagne

Home

Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky is a Canadian photographer known internationally for his images on the shaping of landscape by industry. His photographs explore links between nature and industrial processes of mining, quarrying, manufacturing, shipping, oil production, recycling and water management. A graduate of Ryerson University, Burtynsky is also the founder of Toronto Image Works, the custom photo and digital imaging centre that has served Toronto’s photography community since the 1980s. His exhibition “Manufactured Landscapes,” organized by the National Gallery of Canada, toured from 2003 to 2005. A succeeding exhibition, “China,” toured from 2005 to 2008, while his “Oil” survey, still in circulation, began touring in 2009. In 2014 he mounted an exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery of works created from 1983 and 2013, representing work from all of his key bodies of work. Represented in the collections of more than 50 major museums—the Bibliothèque Nationale, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Reina Sofia, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art among them—Burtynsky is also the subject of the award-winning Jennifer Baichwal film Manufactured Landscapes (2006). His professional distinctions include a TED Prize, the Rencontres d’Arles Outreach Award and the International Center of Photography’s Infinity Award. In 2006, he was awarded the title of Officer of the Order of Canada.