Frank Eugene

Frank Eugene Smith, who was later known by his artist name Frank Eugene and who adopted German citizenship in 1906, was born in New York in 1865. After a first training at the City College, Eugene began to study painting in New York in 1884 and switched to the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich in 1886. During his years of study Eugene began to be interested in the new media of photography and studied further autodidactically. As soon as 1889 Eugene had his first one-man show at the Camera-Club’ in New York, which was founded by Alfred Stieglitz. After his graduation Eugene returned to New York in 1894 and worked for some years as a stage designer and portrait painter, specialising in portraying well-known theatre-actors. Since 1900 he lived in Germany again and got envolved with artistic photography, was admitted to the Linked ring’ in London and founded – together with Stieglitz and Edward Steichen – the American photographer’s society Photo-Session’. Between 1904 and 1910 Eugene’s works were published as heliographs in the advanced photography journal Camera Work’ and became internationally known. Eugene orientated himself in his photographs at painting, following the romanticising style of art photography: Eugene’s treatment of the negatives with opaque colours and etching needle led to his wanted pictorial and graphic effects and with his favoured techniques like platinum print and the rubber-bichrome.technique, he achieved the modern blur of his positives. Since 1907 Eugene began his educational work at the Lehr-und Versuchsanstalt für Fotographie in Munich, which he continued at his chair for artistic photography at the Königliche Akademie für Grafische Künste in Leipzig in 1913. In 1907 Eugene organised a meeting between Stieglitz, Steichen and Heinrich Kühn and brought forward the assimilation of German art photographers to American guidelines. Frank Eugene died in Munich in 1936.

Oliver Rath

Ever since some creative know-it-all came up with this widespread witticism, saying “One Picture is Worth Ten Thousand Words”, the necessity to say anything about Oliver Rath is basically obsolete. Year of birth (78), place of birth (Heidelberg) – who cares about it anyway? His mover/shaker-mentality, his DJing-past, his talent to translate boredom of one thing into a passion for another one – it is all nice things to say about him, but you actually don’t need to know. His DIY-enthusiasm, that built up the whole technical foundation of his existence as a photographer, his mindscape that no school in this world could have teach him, his creative lunacy that’s hidden beneath this Frankish and easy going surface – they are all pretty ornaments for writings like these, but still: anything you could say about him doesn’t come close to the impression of his pictures.

Those are pictures of a maniac. His imagery is infiltrated by codes of urban hedonism, yet ruptured by sometimes prankish, sometimes caustic humour. It is a hard and rough picture language, a language without diplomatic attachments or compromise, but fuelled with unchecked temper and elegant to subtle sense for semantics. He takes everything in that makes a good picture: geometry, contrast, perspective, arrangement. But more than that, he’s a master of those little things, that push a good picture to become an outstanding one. He is the advocate of maximizing impacts. He’ll find the big talk even in the smallest gestures. He might just slam you in the face with a picture. But he might lick your wounds with the very next one. His sense for the right sentiment is without comparison, be it on national or international scale. Call him man of the moment. What do I say? Call him a depicting chronicler of the Zeitgeist. Well, why do I say so much anyway? Just find one of his pictures and call him your new favourite photographer.

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Josef Breitenbach

 

 

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Josef Breitenbach was born on the 3rd of April 1896 into a middle-class wine-merchant family of Jewish descent. He attended technical high school from 1912–15 and trained as a salesman for an instrument firm and later as a book keeper for an insurance firm. He attended Ludwig-Maximillian University in Munich (philosophy and art history, 1914 to 1917) and became active in the Youth Section and later the Pacifist wing of the Social Democratic Party. In 1918, he took part in the Soviet-inspired Bavarian coup d’état, which was the first spark of the revolutionary fire that swept over Germany in the wake of the armistice. For a few months, Breitenbach also occupied an official position in the new government. Although the revolution was short-lived, the ties he forged with the radical circles of Munich’s intelligentsia later helped him establish his reputation as a photographer.

In 1932, after several unsuccessful years at the head of the family business—during which period he was mainly engaged with perfecting his use of a camera—Breitenbach opened his first photographic studio. His clients were prominent members of Munich’s bohemia, including actors and actresses performing in the Munich theater. Munich was a stronghold of libertarians and refined people, whose spirit Breitenbach captured in theatrical portraits of his friend, the journalist Theo Riegler. This world vanished in 1933 with Hitler’s takeover.

More than his Jewish roots, the photographer’s political past made him a target for persecution. In August, 1933, a band of Sturmabteilung (SA) storm troopers, members of Hitler’s private army, banged on the door of his studio. Using a portrait of German nobleman Franz von Papen he’d taken the year before when he was Chancellor of Germany, and a letter of thanks he’d received, Breitenbach convinced the troopers that he was under Papen’s protection. With his passport about to expire, Breitenbach made his way to France a few days later, joining other German exiles seeking refuge in Paris.

 The Surrealist “revolution” had by then become dominant in the Parisian art scene. Soon after his arrival, Breitenbach came into contact with André Breton and his circle. Preferring to retain his independence, he never became a member of the Surrealist group, but did show work in important exhibitions of Surrealist photography alongside Man Ray, Jacques-André Boiffard, Brassaï, Eli Lotar, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Roger Parry.

Breitenbach only lived in Paris for six years, until the war broke out in 1939. Yet during this period, he produced some of his most inventive work. He adopted several techniques favored by new photographers such as superimpression, montage, solarization, printing in negative, and the photogram. More importantly, he was one of the rare artists of the pre-War years to produce color photographs, which he did by using processes of bleaching, toning and pigmentation. Examples are the images “Montparnasse”, “Portrait of a Woman in Black and Red”, and Forever and Ever.

During his years in Paris, he was also an active member of the German exile community, which alerted the democratic world to the threat of fascism. He participated in the 1938 exhibition by the Union des Artistes Allemandes Libres, “Five Years of Hitler Dictatorship”. A high point for Breitenbach was his collaboration with Bertolt Brecht, summarized by portraits of the playwright. The war interrupted this second chapter of the photographer’s life. Interned by the French as a suspicious alien, then drafted into a civilian corps composed of foreigners, Breitenbach eventually escaped to New York from Marseille in 1941.

Breitenbach seemingly had no trouble adjusting to America. New York, the city in which he would spend the rest of his life, became home to him, as evidenced by his photomontage of 1942, “We New Yorkers”. He responded to the electric beat of the city, composing photographs such as “Radio City” (1942) that have a jazz-like quality.

 The 1950s and 1960s were years of intense activity for Breitenbach. He did photographic reportage in Asia for the United Nations and other varied businesses, documenting relief work. He exhibited his photographs extensively in the United States from the 1940s to the mid-1960s, including at the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The time not spent on the road was spent absorbed by his teaching at Cooper Union and The New School.

Since his death in New York on the 7th of October 1984, there have been 26 one person exhibitions of his work, shown in New York, Paris, Berlin, Munich, and multiple other locations in both Europe in the United States. Eight books have been published on his work, including two by Larissa Dryansky (Josef Breitenbach and Josef Breitenbach Manifesto) and Josef Breitenbach Photographien, published by Schirmer/Mosel. The Josef Breitenbach archive is located at the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, Tucso

Berlín, Martin U Waltz

 

 

Martin’s work is about the human element in urban space. He explores the underlying emotions in the city between existential angst, boredom and joy. Martin is a keen observer of the fragility and transiency in urban life. In his street photography Martin emphasizes the contrast between the soft fluid human shape and the hard and static fabric of city infrastructure. Martin uses strong geometrical compositions, still he thinks of his photography as associative and poetic.

His work draws inspiration from many sources beyond the world of photography: literature with the work of J.P. Sartre, Paul Bowles and Michel Houellebecq, painting between Rembrandt, Hopper and Penck, poetry with Baudelaire, Benn and Celan, movies from “The Third Man” to the work of Jim Jarmush and Wong Kar-wai and the recent “Victoria” and tv series like “The Wire” and “Fargo”.

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Jörg Heidenberger

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Dennis Kilch

 

 

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Nora Görlitz

Nora is a 29 years old self taught outdoor photographer from Frankfurt, Germany.

She works as an online marketer in an advertising agency and tries to travel around Germany and Europe as much as possible in her free time, always reflecting her passion. Inspired by nature, her work mainly focuses the outdoors, exploring and adventure. To share and to documentate her pictures with a passionate community, Nora started to use the social media platform Instagram a few years ago.

Gerald Förster

German born photographer/director Gerald Forster has contributed to a range of publications including Esquire, Vogue, New York Magazine, Newsweek and Premiere.

His advertising clients include Hewlett Packard, J.P. Morgan Chase, Lufthansa, Halston, Pantene, Virginia Slim, Charles Schwab and HBO. As a director, his work includes among others commercials for Manon Jewelry, Isabella Fiore and music videos for Jihae.

Forster’s latest work – a series of portraits titled The New Yorkers – is to be published by Oro editions in 2016.

His fine art photography and video installations have been widely exhibited and published by Visionnaire, Les Inrockuptibles, French Photo and Italian GQ.

He is the recipient of numerous international awards like the European Professional Photo Award, the One Life International Award, the Photography Master Cup & the Award of Excellence from Communication Arts.

The LightYears Projet was exhibited at Jenkins Johnson Gallery in New York City & San Francisco, Nocturnal at Hous Projects in New York City and Stephen Cohen Gallery in LA.

Nocturnal is published in a limited edition book available on photoeye.com and selected bookstores.

Gerald Forster resides in New York City.

Bernd Schaefers

Photographer from Cologne, Germany. Finding the darkness in life, to see the light.

“Photography is not for the satisfaction of others. Neither is it some kind of responsibility or mission. It is a means to fill a personal void.”

Chang Chao-Tang

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Eugene Kitsios

My name is Eugene Kitsios, a 25-year-old Dutch photographer with an educational background in ecology and marine biology. My main interest lies in nature and wildlife photography and I mostly enjoy photographing wild animals in their natural habitat.

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Thomas Schweizer


 

Passionate freelance photographer and artist born 1965 in the german town Duesseldorf within a family of artists, father painter and sculptor, mother writer. Worked as assistant for many photographers, before started own career with the age of 25. Travelled world wide for international clients and magazines. Artistic nude photography he startet in the early 90th and became renowned as artist. His work is published in books, shown in exhibitions and has enthusiastic collectors. Playboy Magazin count him to the 50 most important nude art photographers, beside names as Man Ray, Herb Ritts, Albert Watson. Helmut Newton etc.
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Ilse Bing


Ilse Bing (1899 – 1998) was a German avant-garde and commercial photographer who produced pioneering monochrome images during the inter-war era.

Ilse Bing was born into a comfortable Jewish family in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, in 1899. As a child, her education was rich in music and art and her intellectual development was encouraged. In 1920 she enrolled at the University of Frankfurt for a degree in mathematics and physics, but soon changed to study History of Art.

Bing bought a Voigtlander camera in 1928 and started to teach herself photography. The following year she bought a Leica, the new and revolutionary 35mm hand-held camera that had been commercially introduced just three years earlier and enabled photographers to capture fast-moving events.

In 1929, while still pursuing her studies, Bing started to gain photojournalism commissions for Das Illustriete Blatt, a monthly supplement of the illustrated magazine Frankfurter Illustriete. She continued to provide regular picture stories for the magazine until 1931.

At this time, Bing also started collaborating with the architect Mart Stam, a prominent modernist who taught at the Bauhaus school of design from 1928-9 and was appointed chief architect to ‘Das Neue Frankfurt’ (a major construction project) in 1929. Stam commissioned Bing to record all of his housing projects in Frankfurt. He also introduced her to Frankfurt’s avant-garde artistic circles, in particular that of artist Ella Bergman-Michel and her husband Robert, great patrons of the arts who frequently hosted artists such as El Lissitzky, Kurt Schwitters, Jean Arp and Hannah Höch at their house.

With her artistic horizons expanding and finding some commercial success, Bing finally gave up her thesis in the summer of 1929 to concentrate on photography – a rather shocking decision for a woman of her background that astonished her family. The following year, greatly impressed by an exhibition of modern photography in Frankfurt, especially by the work of Paris-based Swiss photographer Florence Henri, Ilse Bing decided to move to Paris, the capital of the avant-garde and epicentre of developments in modern photography.

For the first couple of years in Paris, Bing still published her work regularly with German newspapers, continuing her association with Das Illustriete Blat. Gradually, she also started to publish work in the leading French illustrated newspapers such as L’Illustration, Le Monde Illustré and Regards, and from about 1932, increasingly worked for fashion magazines Paris Vogue, Adam and Marchal, and from 1933-4, American Harpers Bazaar.

Woodland, Kilian Schoenberger

I’m a professional photographer & geographer from Germany; born in 1985. My aspiration was always to cut my path as a photographer with an own creative perspective – despite beeing colourblind. I recognized that I could turn this so-called disadvantage into a strength, too and developed my own unique photographic view: E.g. while getting a picture of a chaotic forest scene, I can’t clearly distinguish the different green and brown tones. Brushing aside this “handicap” I don’t care about those tones and just concentrate on the patterns of the wood to achieve an impressive image structure. Currently I have two residences: One in Cologne and one near Ratisbona in Bavaria. My photographic work concerns the whole range of topics from natural landscapes to cityscapes. Remote rural areas are photographically as interesting as the lifestyle and architecture of urban melting pots. Both worlds fascinate me and so I try to capture my individual view of these changing and challenging environments. For landscape photography I prefer temperate and high latitudes and alpine landscapes. I like the harsh beauty of those areas and the peculiar melancholy that surrounds them. Regions which I am interested in are Norway, Iceland, the Alps, Scotland, the Pacific Northwest, Saxon Switzerland, Kamchatka, Patagonia, New Zealand, the Altai Mountains, Canada and Siberia

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Marius Vieth

My street photography revolves around the human element in an urban world. In the heart of the city hustle from New York to Seoul I capture the synergy between random strangers and their urban environment.

Marius Vieth

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George Portz

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Vincent Peters

 

Vincent Peters was born in 1969 in Bremen, Germany. He began his career taking pictures while traveling through Thailand in the 1980´s. The pictures from this trip were later published by GEO Magazine. In 1989 he moved to New York and started working as photographer assistant. Soon after, Vincent decided to pursue his own creative vision. His work diverged from the path of commercial photography and focused on photography as fine art. The resulting body of work was exhibited extensively throughout Europe and was published in numerous portfolios in fine art periodicals. He returned to Europe in 1995 and rededicated himself to the world of fashion and celebrity photography. Since then he is based between Paris and New York.

His work has been published in international magazines such as Italian Vogue, L´Uomo, French Vogue, British Vogue, Spanish Vogue, German Vogue, Japanese Vogue, Numero, ELLE, British GQ, Italian GQ, Spanish GQ, Arena, Dazed and Confused, The Face.

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Fred Herzog

Fred Herzog (b.1930, Germany) is a photographer known primarily for his photos of life in Vancouver, Canada. He worked professionally as a medical photographer. He was the associate director of the UBC Department of Biomedical Communication, and also taught at Simon Fraser University.

He grew up in Stuttgart, but was evacuated from the city during the aerial bombardment of the Second World War. His parents died during the war (of typhoid and cancer), after which he dropped out of school and found work as a seaman on ships. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, living briefly in Toronto and Montreal before moving to Vancouver in 1953. He had taken casual photos since childhood, and began to take it seriously after moving to Canada.

His work focuses primarily on “ordinary” people, the working class, and their connections to the city around them. He worked primarily with slide film (mostly Kodachrome), which limited his ability to exhibit, and also marginalized him somewhat as an artist in the 1950s and 60s when most work was in Black and White. However, he has been increasingly recognized in recent decades. His work has appeared in numerous books, and various galleries, including the Vancouver Art Gallery

Florian Weiler

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Astrid Sterner

Spanish-German born artist Astrid Sterner started photography at an early age, documenting her surroundings and creating stories using her friends as main subjects. After being accepted into Central Saint Martins in 2007, she moved to London where she would study photography. There she experimented with a large range of lighting and imagery techniques. She was later accepted into a special training program with the Magnum Collective for young upcoming photographers. After graduation, Astrid moved to NYC where she worked for two years for renowned fashion photographer Mario Sorrenti. Later she took the position as Photo assistant and Studio manager of photographer Miguel Reveriego. Astrid is now a freelance fashion photographer based in NY. She has contributed to numerous fashion publications including Vogue Mexico, Interview Magazine, Dazed and Confused, Elle Vietnam, I-D Spain.

La nostalgie d’ amour, Horst Kistner

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