Donna Ferrato

Donna Ferrato is an internationally-known documentary photographer. Her gifts for exploration, illumination, and documentation coupled with a commitment to revealing the darker sides of humanity, have made her a giant in the medium. She has four books including Living with the Enemy which sold over 40,000 copies, and Love & Lust, published by Aperture. She has participated in over 500 one-woman shows and has received awards such as the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanistic Photography (1987), the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism (2003), and the Gender Fairness Award from the New York State Supreme Court Judges (2009). She founded a non-profit called Domestic Abuse Awareness for over a decade and in 2014 launched a campaign called I Am Unbeatable, which features women who have left their abusers. In November 2016, TIME magazine announced her photograph of a woman being hit by her husband (1982) as one of the “100 Most Influential Photographs of All Time.” Currently, Ferrato is documenting her rapidly-changing New York neighborhood of Tribeca for a new book, and leads experimental photo workshops called The Erotic Eye.

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Wayne F. Miller

 

 

 

 

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Wayne F. Miller (September 19, 1918 – May 22, 2013) was an American photographer known for his series of photographs The Way of Life of the Northern Negro. Active as a photographer from 1942 until 1975, he was a contributor to Magnum Photos beginning in 1958.

Guillem Valle

Guillem Valle’s first interest in documentary photography began when, almost by accident, he travelled to Sarajevo at the age of 14 in an Exchange Student program.

Since then, he has worked for uncountable newspapers and magazines around the world, all the while maintaining his own photographic agenda.

He has been based in Bangkok since 2010 covering Southeast Asia for several international media such as The New York Times, The Guardian or The Wall Street Journal among others.

In 2011 he covered the Arab Spring including the civil war in Libya and the Kurdish struggle in Northern Syria.

Laureate with several awards, including World Press Photo and Best of Photojournalism, Valle is currently developing a long-term project about Stateless people in the world.

Quote: “I prefer images that raise more questions than answers”

Currently Based between Barcelona and Bangkok he is one of the founders of Me-Mo Magazine.

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Tatsuo Suzuki

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Marius Vieth

My street photography revolves around the human element in an urban world. In the heart of the city hustle from New York to Seoul I capture the synergy between random strangers and their urban environment.

Marius Vieth

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Emeka Okereke

Emeka Okereke born in 1980 is a Nigerian visual artist and writer who lives and works between Africa and Europe, moving from one to the other on a frequent basis. He came in contact with photography in 2001. He was a member of the renowned Nigerian photography collective, Depth of Field (DOF).

Presently, his works oscillate between diverse mediums. He employs mainly photography, time-based medium of video, poetry and performative interventions in the exploration of the central theme of ‘borders’. His works grapple with the questions of exchange and co-existence in the context of various social-cultural confluences. Another aspect of his practice lies in project organising: coordinating artistic interventions which promote exchanges cutting across indigenous and international platforms.

In 2008 he organised the first ever photographic exchange projects between schools in France and Nigeria – The Fine Art School of Paris and Yaba College of Arts and Technology Lagos. This was eventually followed by Crossing Compasses: Lagos-Berlin Photo Exchange and Converging Visions: Nigeria – Netherlands Photo Exchange (2012).

He is the Founder and Artistic Director of Invisible Borders: The Trans-African Project

In 2003, he won the Photographer award from the AFAA “Afrique en Création” in the 5th edition of the Bamako Photo Festival of photography. He has a Bachelors/Masters degree from the National Fine Art School of Paris and has exhibited in biennales and art festivals in different cities of the world, notably Lagos, Bamako, Cape Town, London, Berlin, Bayreuth, Frankfurt, Nuremberg, Brussels, Johannesburg, New York, Washington, Barcelona, Seville, Madrid, Paris, etc. His works was exhibited at the 56th Venice Biennale of Arts under the Invisible Borders space-installation: “A Trans-African Worldspace” which he also curated.

Tony Ray- Jones

Tony Ray-Jones died in 1972 from leukaemia, aged just 30. After studying photography in England in the late 1950s he went for further study in New York between 1961 and 1964. The exhibition explains that in America ‘the street’ was much more a focus of outdoor life and community and was much more photographed and described than in rainy England.

When he returned to the UK in 1965, Ray-Jones was determined to apply the American aesthetic to record the quirks and character of English street life and his pioneering approach to the drama and narrative of ‘ordinary’ life became hugely influential on all succeeding photographers.

Ray-Jones spent the later 1960s travelling extensively all over England, observing human beings in all their eccentricity and quirkiness. He was photographing what he saw as a disappearing way of life, aware of the onrushing encroachment of Americanisation, of consumerism, of white goods and conveniences which was replacing the England of back-to-backs, outside loos and heavy prams

Todd Webb

 


Todd Webb was an American photographer notable for documenting everyday life and architecture in cities such as New York City, Paris as well as from the American west. His photography has been compared with Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, and the French photographer Eugène Atget. He traveled extensively during his long life and had important friendships with artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams and Harry Callahan. He photographed famous people including Dorothea Lange. His life was like his photos in the sense of being seemingly simple, straightforward, but revealing complexity and depth upon a closer examination. Capturing history, his pictures often transcend the boundary between photography and artistic expression.

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Quiet tokyo, Hiroharu Matsumoto

Tokyo is one of the largest metropolitan area in the world.

People who live in there have a unique loneliness, but they are always hidden in crowd of the city.

I attempted to express loneliness of metropolitan in artificial space by simple composition.

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Doug Caplan


With a photographic career spanning over 20 years, Doug has been focused at producing monochromatic photographic artworks that approach a wide scale of subjects. His work is often presented in a multi-layered way, with an overt attempt to challenge the viewer.

By applying digital alterations and subtle abstraction concepts, Doug investigates the dynamics of landscape, architecture & urban environments, including the manipulation and his personal interpretations of the subject captured. Rather than presenting a factual reality, an illusion is fabricated to conjure the realms of our imagination.

Doug’s photography directly responds to the surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences from the artist as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that go un-noticed

Fred Herzog

Fred Herzog (b.1930, Germany) is a photographer known primarily for his photos of life in Vancouver, Canada. He worked professionally as a medical photographer. He was the associate director of the UBC Department of Biomedical Communication, and also taught at Simon Fraser University.

He grew up in Stuttgart, but was evacuated from the city during the aerial bombardment of the Second World War. His parents died during the war (of typhoid and cancer), after which he dropped out of school and found work as a seaman on ships. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, living briefly in Toronto and Montreal before moving to Vancouver in 1953. He had taken casual photos since childhood, and began to take it seriously after moving to Canada.

His work focuses primarily on “ordinary” people, the working class, and their connections to the city around them. He worked primarily with slide film (mostly Kodachrome), which limited his ability to exhibit, and also marginalized him somewhat as an artist in the 1950s and 60s when most work was in Black and White. However, he has been increasingly recognized in recent decades. His work has appeared in numerous books, and various galleries, including the Vancouver Art Gallery

Camilo José Vergara

For more than four decades I have devoted myself to photographing and documenting the poorest and most segregated communities in urban America. I feel that a people’s past, including their accomplishments, aspirations and failures, are reflected less in the faces of those who live in these neighborhoods than in the material, built environment in which they move and modify over time. Photography for me is a tool for continuously asking questions, for understanding the spirit of a place, and, as I have discovered over time, for loving and appreciating cities.

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Harry Callahan

Born in 1912, Harry Callahan grew up in Detroit, Michigan. He studied engineering at Michigan State College. In 1946, he was appointed by László Moholy-Nagy to teach photography at the Institute of Design in Chicago. Harry Callahan retired in 1977, at which time he was teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design. Harry Callahan’s work has been widely collected in such prestigious institutions such as the Corcoran Gallery of Art, George Eastman House, Smithsonian American Art Museum and The High Museum of Art.

Vivian Maier

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Vienna, Severin Koller

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Sandy Honig

Sandy Honig is a photographer living in New York City. She currently attends New York University, and has worked in the NBC Photo Department and in Saturday Night Live’s photography department. Her photos are character studies of individuals she meets, creates, or secretly steals photos of on the streets.

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Bert Hardy

 

The eldest of seven children, Bert Hardy rose from humble working class origins in Blackfriars, London, leaving school at age 14 to work for a chemist where he learnt how to chemically process photos.

After selling 200 prints of King George V and Queen Mary passing by in a carriage, he went on to freelance for The Bicycle magazine, saving up to buy a second-hand, small-format Leica 35 mm camera which was to change his life.

Self taught and using the small Leica camera instead of the traditional larger press cameras, Hardy was recruited by the editor of Picture Post, Tom Hopkinson, in 1941. He went on to become the Post’s Chief Photographer, earning his first photographer credit for a February 1941 photo-essay about Blitz-stressed fire-fighters.

Hardy later served as a war photographer in the Army Film and Photographic Unit (AFPU) from 1942 until 1946, covering the D-Day landings in June 1944, the liberation of Paris and the allied advance across the Rhine. He was also one of the first photographers to enter the liberated Belsen to record the dreadful scenes there.

His later photo-journalism took him all around the world, and his famous 1951 Picture Post photograph of two young women sitting on railings at Blackpool – which has been reproduced all over the world – was taken on a humble Box Brownie camera.

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Pierre Jamet

Pierre Jamet is a French photographer and singer, born 24 May 1910 in Saint-Quentin (Aisne) and died on August 17, 2000 in Belle-Ile-en-Mer (Morbihan). He is a representative of humanist photography, and was a member of the vocal quartet Les Quatre Barbus.

Garry Winogrand

Garry Winogrand was a street photographer from the Bronx, New York, known for his portrayal of American life, and its social issues, in the mid-20th century. Though he photographed in Los Angeles and elsewhere, Winogrand was essentially a New York photographer. He received three Guggenheim Fellowships to work on personal projects, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and published four books during his lifetime. He was one of three photographers featured in the influential New Documents exhibition at Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1967 and had solo exhibitions there in 1969, 1977 and 1988. He supported himself by working as a freelance photojournalist and advertising photographer in the 1950s and 1960s, and taught photography in the 1970s. His photographs featured in photography magazines including Popular Photography, Eros, Contemporary Photographer and Photography Annual. Photography curator, historian, and critic John Szarkowski called Winogrand the central photographer of his generation. Critic Sean O’Hagan, writing in The Guardian in 2014, said “In the 1960s and 70s, he defined street photography as an attitude as well as a style – and it has laboured in his shadow ever since, so definitive are his photographs of New York.” Phil Coomes, writing for BBC News in 2013, said “For those of us interested in street photography there are a few names that stand out and one of those is Garry Winogrand, whose pictures of New York in the 1960s are a photographic lesson in every frame.” At the time of his death Winogrand’s late work remained undeveloped, with about 2,500 rolls of undeveloped film, 6,500 rolls of developed but not proofed exposures, and about 3,000 rolls only realised as far as contact sheets being made.

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Keith Goldstein

Keith Goldstein was born in Brooklyn, New York. Keith was interested in art for as long as he can remember, with his mother being his biggest influence and supporter, encouraging him in his earliest artistic endeavors. Keith’s first connection with photography came about in high school when he was given a collection of photography magazines to draw from. Instead, he began to read them, becoming extremely fascinated with the medium. It wasn’t until he dropped out of college after his second year, and was working in a warehouse, that he decided on photography as a means to creative expression. Keith began studies at night school with David Attie and moved into New York City, receiving his BFA with Honors in photography from the School of Visual Arts. It was there, working with Tad Yamashiro, that he began to experiment with a more emotive way of expression. Wanting to explore this further, Keith went on to continue his experimentation with Carl Toth at Cranbrook Academy of Art. After receiving his MFA in Photography, he moved back to New York City and began, through a course of personal experiences, to unravel everything that he knew and was for the next 15 years of his life. Keith has been exhibiting his work since 1980. His work has been published in many publications including – ABC News Australia, Now Public, Flak Magazine, JPEG Magazine, File Magazine, Snaps Magazine, SHOTS, Boulevard, Mercury Records, Diversion Magazine, Cadillac Motors, I Magazine, Penquin/Putnam, Simon & Shuster, St. Martin’s Press, and on many book covers. Keith’s tools to finding his place and exploring his feelings towards the world have always been simple – one camera and a couple of lenses. “Being unencumbered does allow you the most freedom”, he says. Keith has been making his living as fine art photographer, a stock shooter, a corporate event photographer, and a photo editor.