Fred Herzog

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Fred Herzog (b.1930, Germany) is a photographer known primarily for his photos of life in Vancouver, Canada. He worked professionally as a medical photographer. He was the associate director of the UBC Department of Biomedical Communication, and also taught at Simon Fraser University.

He grew up in Stuttgart, but was evacuated from the city during the aerial bombardment of the Second World War. His parents died during the war (of typhoid and cancer), after which he dropped out of school and found work as a seaman on ships. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, living briefly in Toronto and Montreal before moving to Vancouver in 1953. He had taken casual photos since childhood, and began to take it seriously after moving to Canada.

His work focuses primarily on “ordinary” people, the working class, and their connections to the city around them. He worked primarily with slide film (mostly Kodachrome), which limited his ability to exhibit, and also marginalized him somewhat as an artist in the 1950s and 60s when most work was in Black and White. However, he has been increasingly recognized in recent decades. His work has appeared in numerous books, and various galleries, including the Vancouver Art Gallery

Camilo José Vergara

Avenue C, Lower East Side, 1970

For more than four decades I have devoted myself to photographing and documenting the poorest and most segregated communities in urban America. I feel that a people’s past, including their accomplishments, aspirations and failures, are reflected less in the faces of those who live in these neighborhoods than in the material, built environment in which they move and modify over time. Photography for me is a tool for continuously asking questions, for understanding the spirit of a place, and, as I have discovered over time, for loving and appreciating cities.

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Harry Callahan

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Born in 1912, Harry Callahan grew up in Detroit, Michigan. He studied engineering at Michigan State College. In 1946, he was appointed by László Moholy-Nagy to teach photography at the Institute of Design in Chicago. Harry Callahan retired in 1977, at which time he was teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design. Harry Callahan’s work has been widely collected in such prestigious institutions such as the Corcoran Gallery of Art, George Eastman House, Smithsonian American Art Museum and The High Museum of Art.

Vivian Maier

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Vienna, Severin Koller

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Sandy Honig

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Sandy Honig is a photographer living in New York City. She currently attends New York University, and has worked in the NBC Photo Department and in Saturday Night Live’s photography department. Her photos are character studies of individuals she meets, creates, or secretly steals photos of on the streets.

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Bert Hardy

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The eldest of seven children, Bert Hardy rose from humble working class origins in Blackfriars, London, leaving school at age 14 to work for a chemist where he learnt how to chemically process photos.

After selling 200 prints of King George V and Queen Mary passing by in a carriage, he went on to freelance for The Bicycle magazine, saving up to buy a second-hand, small-format Leica 35 mm camera which was to change his life.

Self taught and using the small Leica camera instead of the traditional larger press cameras, Hardy was recruited by the editor of Picture Post, Tom Hopkinson, in 1941. He went on to become the Post’s Chief Photographer, earning his first photographer credit for a February 1941 photo-essay about Blitz-stressed fire-fighters.

Hardy later served as a war photographer in the Army Film and Photographic Unit (AFPU) from 1942 until 1946, covering the D-Day landings in June 1944, the liberation of Paris and the allied advance across the Rhine. He was also one of the first photographers to enter the liberated Belsen to record the dreadful scenes there.

His later photo-journalism took him all around the world, and his famous 1951 Picture Post photograph of two young women sitting on railings at Blackpool – which has been reproduced all over the world – was taken on a humble Box Brownie camera.

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Pierre Jamet

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Pierre Jamet is a French photographer and singer, born 24 May 1910 in Saint-Quentin (Aisne) and died on August 17, 2000 in Belle-Ile-en-Mer (Morbihan). He is a representative of humanist photography, and was a member of the vocal quartet Les Quatre Barbus.

Garry Winogrand

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Garry Winogrand was a street photographer from the Bronx, New York, known for his portrayal of American life, and its social issues, in the mid-20th century. Though he photographed in Los Angeles and elsewhere, Winogrand was essentially a New York photographer. He received three Guggenheim Fellowships to work on personal projects, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and published four books during his lifetime. He was one of three photographers featured in the influential New Documents exhibition at Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1967 and had solo exhibitions there in 1969, 1977 and 1988. He supported himself by working as a freelance photojournalist and advertising photographer in the 1950s and 1960s, and taught photography in the 1970s. His photographs featured in photography magazines including Popular Photography, Eros, Contemporary Photographer and Photography Annual. Photography curator, historian, and critic John Szarkowski called Winogrand the central photographer of his generation. Critic Sean O’Hagan, writing in The Guardian in 2014, said “In the 1960s and 70s, he defined street photography as an attitude as well as a style – and it has laboured in his shadow ever since, so definitive are his photographs of New York.” Phil Coomes, writing for BBC News in 2013, said “For those of us interested in street photography there are a few names that stand out and one of those is Garry Winogrand, whose pictures of New York in the 1960s are a photographic lesson in every frame.” At the time of his death Winogrand’s late work remained undeveloped, with about 2,500 rolls of undeveloped film, 6,500 rolls of developed but not proofed exposures, and about 3,000 rolls only realised as far as contact sheets being made.

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Keith Goldstein

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Keith Goldstein was born in Brooklyn, New York. Keith was interested in art for as long as he can remember, with his mother being his biggest influence and supporter, encouraging him in his earliest artistic endeavors. Keith’s first connection with photography came about in high school when he was given a collection of photography magazines to draw from. Instead, he began to read them, becoming extremely fascinated with the medium. It wasn’t until he dropped out of college after his second year, and was working in a warehouse, that he decided on photography as a means to creative expression. Keith began studies at night school with David Attie and moved into New York City, receiving his BFA with Honors in photography from the School of Visual Arts. It was there, working with Tad Yamashiro, that he began to experiment with a more emotive way of expression. Wanting to explore this further, Keith went on to continue his experimentation with Carl Toth at Cranbrook Academy of Art. After receiving his MFA in Photography, he moved back to New York City and began, through a course of personal experiences, to unravel everything that he knew and was for the next 15 years of his life. Keith has been exhibiting his work since 1980. His work has been published in many publications including – ABC News Australia, Now Public, Flak Magazine, JPEG Magazine, File Magazine, Snaps Magazine, SHOTS, Boulevard, Mercury Records, Diversion Magazine, Cadillac Motors, I Magazine, Penquin/Putnam, Simon & Shuster, St. Martin’s Press, and on many book covers. Keith’s tools to finding his place and exploring his feelings towards the world have always been simple – one camera and a couple of lenses. “Being unencumbered does allow you the most freedom”, he says. Keith has been making his living as fine art photographer, a stock shooter, a corporate event photographer, and a photo editor.

Ben Shahn

http://retrophoto.nnm.ru

Ben Shahn was born in Kaunus, Lithuania in 1898. He emigrated to New York with his family in 1906. He became a lithographer’s apprentice after completing his schooling. He later attended both New York University and the National Academy of Design from 1917 to 1921.

In the 1920s Shahn became part of the social realism movement. Social Realism is a term used to describe the works of American artists during the Depression era who were devoted to depicting the social troubles of the suffering urban lower class: urban decay, labor strikes, and poverty. His early work was concerned with political issues of the time, while his later work portrayed the loneliness of the city dweller. Text and lettering formed an integral part of his designs and his work was often inspired by news reports. After working in lithography until 1930, his style crystallized in a series of 23 paintings concerning the Sacco-Vanzetti trial. Shahn came to prominence in the 1930s as with “The Passion of Sacco and Vanzetti”. Shahn dealt consistently with social and political themes. He developed a strong and brilliant sense of graphic design revealed in numerous posters. His painting Vacant Lot (Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Conn.) exhibits a poetic realism, whereas his more abstract works are characterized by terse, incisive lines and a lyric ic intensity of color. The Blind Botanist (Wichita Art Mus.) is characteristic of his abstractions. Shahn’s murals include series for the Bronx Central Annex Post Office, New York City.

From 1933 to 1938 he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration, producing masterful images of impoverished rural areas and their inhabitants. Shahn used photographs throughout his career for both composition and content. The photographer position at the FSA was a dream job for Shahn because it provided him the opportunity to travel though Depression-era America taking pictures. He later used those photographs for his paintings years later. Critics in his time felt that using photographs for paintings diminished the value of a painting. However, Shahn’s work became the most popular artist of his age. His work was on the cover of Time and well as the Museum of Modern Art.

Shahn has been described as a man of uncompromising beliefs and an artist who spoke to the world. Shahn continuously adopted new themes and mediums to define the human condition of his time. Active until the end of his career, Shahn was also a distinguished lecturer, teacher, and writer.

Federico Alegría

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Social Photographer. Currently based at El Salvador 13°40′, -89°13′

Passionate for capturing the unseen and the cotidiane in different social contexts such as Streets, Public Transportation, Rural Scapes and the intimacy of People’s Lives.

I’ve defined myself as a Social Photographer with the help of my peers all over the globe.

Social Photography for me is an organic blend with hues of:

– Street Candid Photography
– Street Portrait Photography
– Documental Photography
– Photojournalism

There is no exact recipe for this, so the projects and essays may taste more like one thing than the other.

Gaining trust on People is the most powerful tool for capturing great stories.

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Helen Levitt

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Helen Levitt (August 31, 1913 – March 29, 2009) was an American photographer. She was particularly noted for “street photography” around New York City, and has been called “the most celebrated and least known photographer of her time”.

Inge Morath

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Vasil Boglev

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This is Vasil Boglev’s sitehe does work in black & white and color. Some of his main topics are: Australia, Macedonia, World, and Choices. These are very impressive shots. They all tell a story in a single click of the shutter. That is what I find so amazing about photojournalism, is that an entire story can be seen in a glimpse. One photograph can be studied and interpreted several different ways by different people

Dimitri Bogachuk

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Bill Perlmutter

© Bill Perlmutter, Galerie Hilaneh von Kories [No image is to be copied, duplicated, modified or redistributed in whole or part without the prior written permission from photoselection GmbH. Fon: +49 40 4232010. mail@galeriehilanehvonkories.de]

BILL PERLMUTTER was born in New York on September 5, 1932. He began his career with a Bachelor of Arts in Motion Picture Techniques from the City College Film Institute in New York.

In 1954 after graduating from the United States Army Photography School, he spend two years in Europe as a staff photographer for the U.S. Army newspapers based in West Germany. Since then he traveled extensively all around the world as a free-lance photographer. From 1978-1997 he worked as the Vice President of Rainbow Chromes, a company specializing in photographic and digital retouching.

Chinatown, Franck Bohbot

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Located in southern Manhattan, Chinatown has evolved over time, expanding at a rapid pace due to its growing population, by nibbling on the borders it shares with the Lower East Side and devouring Little Italy. The Chinatown in Flushing, Queens, is currently the most populated. Still today, a large part of Chinatown operates with a parallel economy. In the 90s, the Chinese community began to invest in other neighbourhoods in the Lower East Side, which Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe had populated fifty years earlier. Currently, the Lower East Side is predominantly a Puerto Rican and Dominican community, although the Chinese have definitely made their mark in recent decades. In this series, Franck Bohbot took an off-beat approach to this bustling “Chinatown” cliché.

These shots embrace the absence of typical daytime noise, deliveries, lively streets, and tourist visits. Silence reigns.

Half-way between poetry and science fiction-like movie sets, through this nocturnal series with New York City as the sole backdrop, he invites us to discover an empty, motionless neighbourhood devoid of its inhabitants. Deserted streets, and the rare, almost UFO-like passerby dropped on quasi-unreal urban sites, resemble fiction more than typical photographic reporting. Marrying colorimeter and urban lighting, combining technique with photographic patience, and wanting to bring life to nighttime characters or basic storefronts were all challenging. With his camera by his side, some images were shot instinctively while others are more contemplative. The result is an enigmatic voyage that creates a pictorial and fantasy-like universe in the thick of night. 

Clemens Kalischer

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Clemens Kalischer immigrated with his parents to Paris from his native Bavaria in 1933, when Hitler came to power, and then to the United States in 1942. After studying photography at Cooper Union and the New School for Social Research, he worked as a photojournalist for the French Press news agency and for Coronet magazine. By 1949 he was a successful freelance photographer and photojournalist, with work published in such magazines and newspapers as the New York Times, Newsweek, Time, Fortune, Du, and in the alternative press as well, including In Context and Common Ground. Kalischer’s architectural photographs have appeared in Architectural Forum, Urban Design International, and Progressive Architecture. He has operated the Image Gallery in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, for more than thirty years, and maintains an archive of some 500,000 stock photographs, supplied to publications worldwide. As both photographer and teacher, he works extensively with institutions such as Bennington and Hampshire colleges, Georgetown, and Harvard. Kalischer has been an active member of One by One, an international dialogue group for survivors and perpetrators of the Holocaust that seeks emotional healing.
Kalischer’s work extends the tradition of photojournalism inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson and André Kertész. His recent interest in agriculture, architecture, education, the environment, music, religion, and socioeconomic matters, however, adds a level of personal dedication to his images that pushes his body of work beyond its aesthetic precedents.

Wolf Suschitzky

Tenements London 1936

Thailand, 1956


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