Maxim Dondyuk

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Maxim Dondyuk – photographer, visual artist, born in Ukraine.

His professional career began in Ukrainian media as a photojournalist in 2007. Since 2010 he is a freelancer, works on creating and promoting his own documentary projects.
His first long-term projects ‘Uman, Rosh Hashana’ (2008-2012), ‘TB epidemic in Ukraine’ (2010-2012), ‘The Crimea Sich’ (2010-2013) are an analysis of the time, situation.
Being not interested in stereotypes, he is a direct participant in the events, and uses personal experience and emotions in order to emphasize the basic meaning of the events.
From the project ‘Culture of the Confrontation’, 2013-2014, Maxim’s perception of photography has changed. He began filling his works with second meaning and associational level.
He doesn’t want to specify the time period, the place and reasons. Through photography he wants to show eternal themes, wants people to associate his works with their memories
from reading books, music, their own life.

Maxim is the recipient of numerous grants and awards: Finalist of the Prix Pictet Photography Prize, International Photographer of the Year in Lucie Awards,
Finalist of the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography, Winner of the Ville de Perpignan Remi Ochlik Award,
Magnum Photos competition ‘30 under 30’ for emerging documentary photographers, Winner of the Prix Photo La Quatrieme Image etc.

His photos were exhibited in solo and group exhibitions around the world: Musée d’Art Moderne (Paris), Somerset House (London), MAXXI, National Museum of XXI Century Arts (Rome),
LUMA Westbau – Löwenbräukunst (Zurich), International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum (Geneva), CAB Art Center (Brussels), Museum of The History of Ukraine in World War II (Kyiv),
Visa pour l’Image (Perpignan), European Solidarity Centre (Gdansk) etc.

He was published in Rolling Stone, TIME, Newsweek, Der Spiegel, STERN, Paris Match, Le Monde, PDN, Bloomberg Businessweek, Polka etc.
Also he works with international organizations, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

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Benjamin Lowy

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Benjamin Lowy is award winning photographer based in New York City. He received a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis in 2002 and began his career covering the Iraq War in 2003. Since then he has covered major stories worldwide. In 2004 Lowy attended the World Press Joop Swart Masterclass, he was named in Photo District News 30 and his images of Iraq were chosen by PDN as some of the most iconic of the 21st century. Lowy has received awards from World Press Photo, POYi, PDN, Communication Arts, American Photography, and the Society for Publication Design. Lowy has been a finalist for the Oskar Barnak Award, a finalist in Critical Mass, included in Magenta Flash Forward 2007, as well as the OSI Moving Walls 16 exhibit. His work from Iraq, Darfur, and Afghanistan have been collected into several gallery and museum shows, and shown at the Tate Modern, SF MOMA, Houston Center for Photography, Invalides, and Arles. His work from Darfur appeared in the SAVE DARFUR media campaign.
In 2011 Lowy’s Iraq | Perspectives work was selected by William Eggleston to win the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. The book is currently available and in stores now.
In 2012, Lowy was awarded the Magnum Foundation Emergency fund to continue his work in Libya. In the same year, he received the International Center of Photography (ICP) Infinity Award for Photojournalism.
Lowy is based in New York City. He is currently editorially represented by Reportage by Getty Images.

Goran Tomasevic

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Free Syrian Army fighters take a break from clashes in a coffee shop in Aleppo






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Most of the time I cover conflicts in different parts of the world.
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Gleb Garanich

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I cover sport, breaking news and human interest stories
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Laura Hospes

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Laura Hospes (1994) has been capturing her own self with the camera since the tender age of 16, out of a need to connect with people. This need has not waned over the years; it has only become more necessary. Hospes’ self portraits are her way of making clear what is inside of her. Her camera consoles and understands her better than anyone else. Photography is her medium to accept and process the many struggles in her life. The resulting images are intense and arresting, as well as being a captivating glimpse inside the world of a young woman dealing with depression and anxiety.

Hospes was named one of the 50 best emerging photographers of 2015 by the international jury for the Lensculture Emerging Talent Awards. Her work has been frequently featured both home and abroad.

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Andrea Star Reese

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Andrea Star Reese is a VISURA photojournalist/documentary photographer based in New York, Seattle, and Jakarta.

Recent work includes:

DISORDER (2011-2016), a five-year documentary reportage on abuse against people with psychosocial disabilities in Indonesia was first exhibited and screened at Visa Pour L’Image Perpignan, and Angkor Photo Festival in 2013. In 2016 Images from the essay were used by Human Rights Watch in the 2016 report LIVING IN HELL and as part of the Break The Chains Campaign against shackling.. Disorder was a 2014 finalist for the Manual Rivera-Ortiz Grant and included in American Photography 28: Best pictures from 2011.

URBAN CAVE (2007-2014), a seven-year documentary reportage on unsheltered men and women living underground in New York City was first exhibited at Visa Pour L’Image 2010 where it was a Visa d’Or, Feature nominee. Most recently photographs from Urban Cave were exhibited at Musee de L’Elysee, Lausanne and are part of the museum’s collection. The project received the 2014 David Pike Award for Excellence in Journalism_Photography, and Best Social Documentary from The 2009 New York Photo Festival. Urban Cave was awarded 2nd place from 2014 Kontinent Awards and in 2011, a second place Fotovisura Award. Urban Cave was a finalist for both the 2013 FotoEvidence book award and 2011 POYI: World Understanding Award among other recognitions. The series was included in several exhibitions for FotoEvidence and ReGeneration 2 and exhibited at Theory of the Clouds Gallery, Kobe, Japan, and the 2013 Athens Photo Festival.

The Urban Cave Photo Book, edited by Alison Morley was published in 2015 by FotoEvidence. 

Ms Reese began her career as a filmmaker in 1983 and transitioned to Photojournalism/Documentary Photography in 2007. On staff at the International Center of Photography School, and a tutor at the 2013 Angkor Photo Festival Workshop, Andrea Star Reese is a 2010 fellow in Photography from the New York Foundation for the Arts and a reGeneration2 photographer.

Images from Disorder and Urban Cave have received wide International coverage in print, wire, and media publishing.

Published credits include:

Al Jazeera, AJ+, CNN, CNN.com, Sidney Morning Herald, BBC News Alerts, The Guardian, Time.com, Huffington Post, El Dario, Goteborgs Posten, Irish Examiner, El CIUdadano, Feature Shoot, Business Insider, Lightbox.time.com, Vogue.It, Kompas, Jakarta Post, Media Indonesia, Neue Zucher Zeitung, Le Monde, Liberation, New York Times Lens Blog, Alternatives Internationales, Sunday Times Magazine, Paris Match, The Fader, Le Loop, NPR, Fiasco

Gervasio Sánchez

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Dmitri Baltermants

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Juvenile In Justice, Richard Ross

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BASICS: YES [Youth Emergency Shelter], Philadelphia, PA All youth referred by DHS. Serves 12-17 years old with board extension until 21. 30 day maximum stay; supposed to be temporary until permanent placement is found. DESCRIPTION: My father is Muslim. He lives in Northeast. I was living with my mom, grandmother, and 14-year-old little brother. My parents separated when I was younger. My mom kicked me out and put me on the streets when I was 15. She said you don't live here anymore. My mom was 33. That's when she started smoking wet—embalming fluid, dippers, cigarettes dipped in embalming fluid. She kept on getting more aggressive. It wasn't my mother; it was the dippers. My mom maced me before I came in the house. She came swinging at me. My little brother didn't know what it was about. That's when things started getting real sour. I remember worrying about what I was going to eat at the moment. I needed to rob somebody to get some money to eat. Then I saw a police officer, and he saw both the hostility and pain in my face. He brought me here; they gave me a bowl of cereal and somewhere to sleep. They set up a meeting with my mom and father. They helped me patch my relationship with my mom and father. They put me in youth sponsorship programs, leadership programs for African American males, called Frontline Dads, and programs like the Barbershop. There are places you can get things right. There are different places you can get help. Each one you can discuss things in different ways. At ball courts, if you show pain you get looked at differently. At the Barbershop you can let the pain out. It's like a symposium that’s community based. They helped me realize the deeper demons I had. Since 6th grade I was known as the dirty kid. I couldn't afford clothes. And lots of kids didn't want to be friends with me. I wanted to be nicely dressed so I started selling drugs to cloth me and put food in my mouth. I watched my mom sell drugs. Then my cousins. They were big time

2Juvenile In Justice is a project to document the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them.

Girls in Justice, the much-anticipated follow up

to Juvenile in Justice, turns our focus to girls in the system, and not a moment too soon. With a preface by Marian Wright Edelman and essays by Leslie Acoca, Dr. Karen Countryman-Roswurm, and Mariame Kaba, Maisha T. Winn.

Juvenile in Justice the book, with essays by Ira Glass of This American Life and Bart Lubow of Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Purchase Girls in Justice.

Purchase Juvenile in Justice (PDF).

The work has been published on CNN, SlateWired.comNPRPBS Newshour, ProPublica, and Harper’s Magazine, for which it was awarded the 2012 ASME Award for Best News and Documentary Photography. The project has been generously supported by grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and the Center for Cultural Innovation.

Learn more about the project, view images by site, and follow the blog:
www.juvenile-in-justice.com

Migrant crisis in Europe

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Migrants pass the border between the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Greece, near the town of Gevgelija, Sept. 2. The Gevgelija-Presevo journey is just a part of the journey that the refugees, the vast majority of them from Syria, are forced to make along the so-called Balkan corridor, which takes them from Turkey, across Greece, Macedonia and Serbia to Hungary, the gateway to the European Union. (Valdrin Xhemaj/EPA
Migrants fall as they rush to cross into Macedonia after police allowed a small group of people to pass through a passageway, as they try to regulate the flow of migrants at the Macedonian-Greek border Sept. 2. Up to 3,000 migrants are expected to cross into Macedonia every day in the coming months, most of them refugees fleeing war, particularly from Syria, the United Nations said last week. (Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters)

Two Syrian women embrace after arriving on Kos in an inflatable dinghy on August 30, in Kos, Greece. Migrants from many parts of the Middle East and African nations continue to flood into Europe before heading from Athens, north to the Macedonian border. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) Migrants who arrived from Budapest walk on the platform at Vienna’s Westbahnhof railway station on Aug. 31. After arriving at Vienna’s Westbahnhof, many of the migrants then boarded a train to Salzburg, while others climbed on to another one headed for Munich. (Patrick Domingo/AFP/Getty Images) A migrant boy looks through a window onboard a train for Serbia at the new transit center for migrants at the border line between Greece and Macedonia near the town of Gevgelija on Aug. 28. (ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty.Images) Hungarian policemen detain a Syrian migrant family after they entered Hungary at the border with Serbia, near Roszke, August 28. (Bernadett Szabo/Reuters)

A migrant family runs after crossing a border line near the village of Roszke on the Hungarian-Serbian border on August 28, 2015. (Attila Kisbenede/AFP/Getty Images)
A Swiss police officer accompanies migrants from Syria carrying their children, upon their arrival at the railway station in the north-eastern Swiss town of Buchs on Sept. 1. (Arnd Wiegmann/Reuters)
A man and his sons, migrants from Iran, wait for the train on their way to Vienna on August 31. Nickelsdorf is the first village in Austria on the way from Hungary. (Vladimir Simicek/AFP/Getty Images)
Police load a group of Afghan migrants into a van after the migrants crossed from Austria into Germany and were walking along the A3 highway in the early hours on August 30, near Neuhaus am Inn, Germany. Police took them shortly after to a registration center for asylum seekers. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
A migrant family gathers with a few hundred others in wait for a train to Germany at the Keleti train station in Budapest, Sept. 1. The station, which has emerged as ground zero in Europe’s spiraling migration crisis, temporarily shut down its services Tuesday under the strain of an influx of migrants trying to travel to Germany from Hungary. (Mauricio Lima/The New York Times)

Hungarian soldiers put up razor wire on top of a fence on the border with Serbia, in Asotthalom, Hungary, Aug. 31. Refugees surging through the Balkans now are racing against Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s right-wing nationalist government, which has ordered army engineers to erect a 13-foot (4-meter) fence along the border. (Darko Bandic/Associated Press)

Syrian and Iraqi migrants sleep on railroad tracks waiting to be processed across the Macedonian border Sept. 2 in Idomeni, Greece. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called ‘Balkans route’ has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Migrants cross the border between the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Greece, near the town of Gevgelija, Macedonia, Sept. 1. (Valdrin Xhema/EPA)

Syrian refugees and migrants rest along a railway line as they try to cross from Serbia into Hungary near Horgos on Sept. 1. European Union leaders called for action to defend the “dignity” of migrants ahead of fresh emergency talks, as tensions flared on the bloc’s eastern borders over the escalating crisis. (Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images) Abdullah Kurdi, father of three-year old Aylan Kurdi, cries as he leaves a morgue in Mugla, Turkey, Sept. 3. The family of Aylan, a Syrian toddler whose body washed up on a Turkish beach, had been trying to emigrate to Canada after fleeing the war-torn town of Kobani. His 5-year-old brother Galip and mother Rehan, 35, also died after their boat capsized while trying to reach the Greek island of Kos. His father, Abdullah, was found semi-conscious and taken to hospital near Bodrum. (Murad Sezer/Reuters)

A Syrian refugee from Deir Ezzor, holding his son and daughter, breaks out in tears of joy after arriving via a flimsy inflatable boat crammed with about 15 men, women and children on the shore of the island of Kos in Greece, Aug. 15. (Daniel Etter/The New York Times)
Migrant men help a fellow migrant man holding a boy as they are stuck between Macedonian riot police officers and migrants during a clash near the border train station of Idomeni, northern Greece, as they wait to be allowed by the Macedonian police to cross the border from Greece to Macedonia, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015. Macedonian special police forces have fired stun grenades to disperse thousands of migrants stuck on a no-man’s land with Greece, a day after Macedonia declared a state of emergency on its borders to deal with a massive influx of migrants heading north to Europe. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic) (Darko Vojinovic)
Syrian migrants travel on a bus after arriving on a ferry carrying about 2,500 migrants from the Greek islands to the main port of Piraeus on Aug. 26, in Athens, Greece. (Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
Migrants wait on the dock after disembarking from a Medecins Sans Frontieres ship carrying 320 migrants in the Sicilian harbour of Augusta, Italy, Aug. 25. (Antonio Parrinello/Reuters)

Record number of migrants, most of them refugees fleeing war and crisis in the Mideast and Africa are seeking asylum in Europe. The countries are grappling with what to do with the unprecedented numbers as the crisis escalates and measures are implemented to control the masses. Many have died on their perilous journeys across land and sea.–By Leanne Burden Seidel

Syria’s Children

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main_900A wounded Syrian girl stands in a makeshift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of Syria’s capital of Damascus, following shelling and air raids by Syrian government forces on August 22, 2015. At least 20 civilians were killed, and another 200 wounded or trapped in Douma, a monitoring group said, just six days after regime airstrikes killed more than 100 people and sparked international condemnation of one of the bloodiest government attacks in Syria’s war.  Abd Doumany / AFP / Getty


A Syrian refugee tends to her daughter while cooking inside her tent at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan, on August 26, 2015. Muhammed Muheisen / AP


Residents, with their belongings, return to their villages on a pickup truck after Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) fighters said that they regained control of the area from ISIS fighters in the southern countryside of Ras al-Ain on May 13, 2015. Rodi Said / Reuters


A boy carries a bag of new clothes ahead of the Eid al-Fitr holiday marking the end of Ramadan in Jobar, a suburb of Damascus, Syria, on July 15, 2015. Bassam Khabieh / Reuters


A Turkish soldier offers water to a Syrian refugee child after crossing into Turkey from Syria in Akcakale, southeastern Turkey, on June 14, 2015. Lefteris Pitarakis / AP


Syrian children arrive at the Akcakale crossing gate between Turkey and Syria on June 16, 2015. Bulent Kilic / AFP / Getty


A Syrian refugee child drinks tea while standing outside her family’s tent at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan, on August 26, 2015. Muhammed Muheisen / AP


Syrian refugee children laugh as they sit on the side of a road that leads to the Akcakale border gate as they wait to return to their home in the northern Syrian town of Tel Abyad on June 18, 2015. Bulent Kilic / AFP / Getty


A young migrant coming from Syria sleeps on a train heading north from Nis, Serbia, to Belgrade on July 18, 2015. Illegal immigrants cross Serbia on their way to other European countries as it has land access to four members of the 28-nation bloc—Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia. Dimitar Dilkoff / AFP / Getty


Syrian refugees ask for water in Akcakale at the Turkish border near the Syrian town of Tal Abyad, on June 13, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an “open-door” policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. Bulent Kilic / AFP / Getty


A man lifts a young girl clear of the wire as Syrians fleeing the war pass through broken-down border fences to enter Turkish territory illegally, near the Turkish Akcakale border crossing in the southeastern Sanliurfa province, on June 14, 2015. Bulent Kilic / AFP / Getty


A Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) fighter walks with a girl in Tel Abyad town, Raqqa governorate, June 16, 2015. Rodi Said / Reuters


Girls who survived what activists said was a ground-to-ground missile attack by forces of Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad hold hands in Aleppo’s Bab al-Hadeed district on April 7, 2015. Abdalrhman Ismail / Reuters


Syrian migrants cross under a fence as they enter Hungary at the border with Serbia, near Roszke, August 27, 2015. Hungary made plans to reinforce its southern border with helicopters, mounted police, and dogs, and was also considering using the army as record numbers of migrants, many of them Syrian refugees, passed through coils of razor-wire into Europe. Bernadett Szabo / Reuters


A Syrian youth runs past blood stains and debris following airstrikes by government forces on the rebel-held town of Douma on August 20, 2015, Sameer Al-Doumy / AFP / Getty


Children pose on their bicycles in front of a destroyed building in the center of the Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, Syria. on June 20, 2015. Kurdish fighters with the YPG took full control of Kobane and strategic city of Tal Abyad, dealing a major blow to the Islamic State group’s ability to wage war in Syria. Mopping up operations were started to make the town safe for the return of residents from Turkey, after more than a year of ISIS militants holding control of the town. Ahmet Sik / Getty


Syrian children walk on rubble after their building partially collapsed following a reported airstrike by government forces on a rebel-held area of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on April 19, 2015
Karam Al-Masri

Four and a half years of violent conflict have destroyed entire regions of Syria. Neighborhoods have been smashed by shelling and government barrel bombs, and towns have been seized by rebels and ISIS militants, then retaken by government troops, killing hundreds of thousands and injuring even more. The United Nations now estimates that more than 4 million Syrians have become refugees, forced to flee to neighboring countries or Europe. Caught in the middle of all this horror are the children of Syria, relying on parents who have lost control of their own lives and are now being forced to make difficult choices in desperate circumstances. Though many families remain in Syria’s war zones, thousands of others are taking dangerous measures to escape, evading militias, government forces, border guards, predatory traffickers, and more, as they struggle to reach safety far from home.
Alan Taylor

Baz Ratner

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Olivier Laban-Mattei

Chad / Nigerian Refugees / Kaltouma Abakar (L), 22, a Nigerian refugee, her new-born daughter Falmata Idrissa, and her nephew Alhadji Haoudou (C), 16, arrive with the rest of their family on the beach of Baga Sola, Chad, in February 8, 2015, after being rescued by the Chadian authorities from islands where they were hiding on the lake Chad. They all will be transfered in the Dar-es-Salam camp, 12 kms from Baga Sola. / UNHCR / O. Laban-Mattei / February 2015

 

 

 

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Alexandra Boulat

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Alexandra Boulat was born in Paris, France, May 2nd 1962 and died in Paris on the 5th of October 2007.

She was originally trained in graphic art and art history, at the Beaux Arts in Paris. In 1989 she follows the step of her father Photographer Pierre Boulat, who worked for LIFE magazine for 25 years, and became a photojournalist as well. She was represented by Sipa Press for 10 years until 2000. In 2001 she co-founded VII photo agency. Her news and features stories were published in many international magazines, above all National Geographic Magazine, Time and Paris-Match. She has received many of the most prestigious international photography awards for her work.

Boulat covered news, conflicts and social issues as well as making extensive reportages on countries and people. Among her many varied assignments, she reported on the wars in former Yugoslavia from 1991 until 1999, including Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo; the fall of the Taliban, the Iraqi people living under the embargo in the 90s, and the invasion of Baghdad by the coalition in 2003. During the last few years she was working on the Israeli and Palestinian conflict. She also photographed Yasser Arafat’s family life and Yves Saint Laurent’s last show in 2001. Other large assignments include country stories on Indonesia and Albania, and a people story on the Berbers of Morocco. Her latest work was on Muslim Women in the Middle East and Gaza.

Alexandra Boulat was the architect of one of the most deliberate, focused and militant bodies of work on the victims – particularly women – of conflict and injustice of our time.

Migrations: Humanity in Transition, Sebastião Salgado

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Personally, I believe that people in the future will look back at this turning point and see it as a revolution experienced by mankind at this end-of-the-century, end-of-the-millennium historical period, this marking point of 2000 years of Christendom. This is a revolution that can be compared to the passage from the Middle Age to the modern age at the end of the fifteenth century. The scale of change is vast: For the first time in history, the majority of the planet’s population is dwelling in cities, and at the same time the concepts of borders and cultural distinctions have started to disappear.

At this time, I want to speak out for immigrants, for those who live in such circumstances, and to speak out to those who can receive them. I want to show the immigrants’ dignity in their willingness to integrate into another country, to show their courage and their entrepreneurial spirit and, not least, to demonstrate how they enrich us all with their individual differences. Above all, by using migration as an example, I want to show that a true human family can only be built on foundations of solidarity and sharing.
I know this story very well because it is my story. I made the same migrations that a great mass of the world’s population is doing now. I was born on a farm in Brazil. And when I was five, I moved with my family to a small town, about 10,000 people. Then when I was 15, I went to a medium-sized town, about 120,000 people. And when I finished college, it was necessary for me to go to a big big town, to São Paolo, and in São Paolo I had some political problems and the time came to leave Brazil and I came to France. That means this story that I’m photographing is my story also. I am a migrant, too.
I started to develop this project in 1992, I began photographing in 1993, and I finish now in 1999. So I have been photographing this project for six-and-a-half years. And I have traveled to about 47 different countries around the world where people are moving from place to place, and shot in more than 40
I have found this to be a story about the complete reorganization of humanity, the human family around the world. I have organized this large-scale documentation into six chapters.
First is International Migration….There were about 20 million international migrants in the mid-1980s; 50 million by the end of that decade; and more than 120 million today. News travels fast in our global village. The radio and television around the world portray the Western way of life; beautiful, rich and easy to achieve. In the most backward regions of the world, the poorest of the poor are convinced that somewhere over there, everybody leads that “ideal” life.
My exploration of international migration took me to photograph in several regions of the world, including the ex-USSR, where I followed the departure of Jewish peoples for the U.S.; the U.S.-Mexican border, where I photographed Latin Americans crossing over; Italy, where people from the Balkans and Asia attempt to enter Europe via the Adriatic Sea; Spain, a destination for Africans via the Straits of Gibraltar. Next is Refugees….The flow of refugees has also grown under the pressure of natural disasters and wars, which have been unprecedented in number since World War II. According to official estimates, there are currently 26 million refugees around the world, compared to 2.5 million 20 years ago. This figure includes neither unrecorded refugees — estimated to number six million — nor persons displaced inside their own countries, estimated at 32 million people.
Among the refugees I have photographed are: Bosnians, Vietnamese “boat people”, Afghanis, Kurds, Palestinians and Iranians. Third is The African Drama….For several decades now, Black Africa has fallen victim to a series of natural disasters and wars which have resulted in complete destabilization of economic and social life in most countries on the African continent. Furthermore, Black Africa has the highest birthrate in the world, the largest rate of demographic growth on the planet. In 1970, the population was 362 million people; in 1990 it was 642; and it is estimated that it will be 1.15 billion by the year 2010, indicating that demographic growth doubles every 20 years. By 2025, then, it is expected that Nigeria alone will have a population as large as the entire European community.
As a result of this combination of natural disasters, wars and demographic growth, Africa today is the unfortunate record holder in terms of numbers of refugees and displaced people. It is also unique in terms of violence.
Because of the scale of disaster that this enclave of humankind is experiencing, we decided to devote a specific chapter to them, with reportages including: voluntary repatriation to Mozambique of millions of refugees, after 15 years of war; Southern Sudan, with its displaced peoples worn down by war, drought and famine; the huge flow of Rwandan refugees to Tanzania and Burundi, and the conflicts within Rwanda; the appalling refugee camps in Goma, Zaire.
Next is Leaving the land for the cities….Between 40 and 50 million rural dwellers leave the land to go to the cities every year. The growth of migration within and between nations is inexhaustible. Because of  pressure on the land, over-exploitation of the soil and demographic growth, the Third World is at the core of the planet’s environmental crisis. In this part of the world, the environmental problem is weakening and erosion of the soil, which often provokes famine. Some 450 million Third World peasants cultivate land that is both low-yielding and declining in terms of quality. Millions are left without work or land.
This work is composed of the following stories: the struggle of the Brazilian landless peasants, who refuse to be corralled into urban centers; the hundreds of thousands of peasants who have been swallowed up by the diamond industry in India; the exodus of men from rural areas of Oaxaca and Guerrero, Mexico, leaving villages only inhabited by women and children; the leaving of the land by the Indians in the Chimborazo region of Ecuador; the tribes of southern Bihar in India, who want to protect their land against large mines and dams; the abandoning of their villages by million of peasants in China, due to the construction of the Three Gorge Dam; the last bushmen of Namibia and South Africa.
This trend is creating The planet’s new metropolises….Bombay, India; Djarkata, Indonesia; São Paolo, Brazil; Cairo, Egypt; Mexico City, Mexico; Bangkok, Thailand; and Shanghai, China.
Growth comes mainly due to exodus from rural areas. By the end of this century, eight of the planet’s ten largest metropolises will lie in the Third World, each of them with a population of more than 15 million. Thirty years ago, these cities had an average population of less than 5 million people.
These huge cities, with their belts of shantytowns, are more than ever an El Dorado in the eyes of jobless and landless rural workers. In the city, income is twice as high as in rural areas and drinkable water, schooling and doctors are more accessible.
The final piece of the project is Children Today: men and women of the new century.
When I was working in the displaced persons camps in Mozambique in 1994, I constantly found myself surrounded by groups of children who kept me from my work, always trying to be in the picture. So I made a deal with them: I would make a portrait of each of them, and in exchange they would let me be. I continued to do this every time I encountered the same problem.
Back in Paris while I was editing the work, I realized that I here I had a group of powerful portraits; that in front of my camera, I had had very young people who had lived experiences of great intensity already.
These seemingly simple and straightforward portraits depict with force their pain and their dignity. Here, I have a true sample of the men and women of tomorrow, on whom humankind must depend in order to build the future.
Through all these themes and chapters together, we tell the story.
This is the story I imagined in 1992, which is now completed…..We are living a globalization of humans. I believe this concept of border as we have had in the past, is now a relic of the eighteenth century. Now we are living in the moment close to the twenty-first century, where we are completely changing the concept of borders. In the European community, we have eliminated the border for goods. We eliminate the borders for information. We eliminate the borders for money. The border concept must change completely, and quickly to accommodate the reality of human movement.
The re-distribution of population is going on now, and happening very, very fast. And, when we speak about globalization, we must speak today about globalization of population now. This is happening now. From these photographs, we are preparing an international book, exhibition and a series of films.
What we are trying to do with all this is to provoke a debate, to provoke a discussion about the human condition today.
I want the person to come out of this show to see immigrants in a new way, with a new respect. I want the person in the United States who is sitting at a restaurant with a young man from El Salvador, from Mexico, serving him, I want that person to see through the pictures that it is a long, long trip to come there and sometimes very dangerous. This young man working in the restaurant had the courage to move himself, to fight for his dignity, to fight for a job. I want the American to see that all these people moving around are moving somewhere to work, to produce, to give something to the country in which they want to live. This is the spirit in which I have created these pictures, this book and this exhibition.

The World’s Children

India UN Childrens Rights


A street child searches for recyclable material in a garbage dump on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, Thursday, Nov. 19, a day ahead of Universal Children’s Day. Twenty years after the U.N. adopted a treaty guaranteeing children’s rights, fewer youngsters are dying and more are going to school, but an estimated 1 billion still lack services essential to their survival and development, UNICEF said. AP / Anupam Nath


A street child displays acrobatic skills with the help of an iron ring during a street show in Katmandu, Nepal. AP / Gemunu Amarasinghe


A street child sleeps next to a stray dog, as another looks for fleas in his clothes, in Katmandu, Nepal, AP / Gemunu Amarasinghe


Bangladeshi child laborers work at a balloon workshop in Kamrangir Char, on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh. AP / Pavel Rahman


School children chant morning prayers in an open-air government-run school in Jammu, India. AP / Channi Anand

India UN Childrens Rights
Roha, an infant, is left sleeping on the sidewalk of a busy street in Mumbai, India on Wednesday. AP / Rafiq Maqbool


Children wash clothes and bathe at a water pipeline surrounded by sewage in Mumbai, India on Wednesday. AP / Rafiq Maqbool


Dinesh, 8, cuts rose stems outside a flower shop in Gauhati, India on Wednesday . AP / Anupam Nath


Sheela, 6, walks the tightrope during a street performance in Gauhati, India, Wednesday. AP / Anupam Nath


Children play in a rickshaw at a garbage dump in Hyderabad, India on Tuesday. AP / Mahesh Kumar A


Children study in a yard with scrap collected for recycling, in Hyderabad, India.  AP / Mahesh Kumar A


Children from impoverished families attend a class at a government-run school in Gauhati, India. AP / Anupam Nath


Children gather to celebrate children’s rights in Harare. AP


Internally displaced women line up to receive therapeutic food for their children at a food distribution centre run by an organization called CAACID, funded by the UN agencies and European Union, in Mogadishu, Somalia. AFP / Getty Images / Mohamed Dahir

The Frame

The Vietnam War, Eddie Adams

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The photojournalist Eddie Adams, who covered the Vietnam War for the Associated Press, not only captured the action and chaos but took the time to get up close to the Vietnamese people whenever he could. In 1968, he undertook a project called “Hands of a Nation,” taking intimate photos of the hands of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians. Their hands were busy doing so many things then: reaching out for medicine, grasping weapons, straining against bindings, soothing, praying, rebuilding. Adams photographed hands young and old, belonging to the healthy and the wounded, the living and the dead

The Vietnam War, Horst Faas

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Fifty years ago, in March 1965, 3,500 U.S. Marines landed in South Vietnam. They were the first American combat troops on the ground in a conflict that had been building for decades. The communist government of North Vietnam (backed by the Soviet Union and China) was locked in a battle with South Vietnam (supported by the United States) in a Cold War proxy fight. The U.S. had been providing aid and advisors to the South since the 1950s, slowly escalating operations to include bombing runs and ground troops. By 1968, more than 500,000 U.S. troops were in the country, fighting alongside South Vietnamese soldiers as they faced both a conventional army and a guerrilla force in unforgiving terrain. Each side suffered and inflicted huge losses, with the civilian populace suffering horribly. Based on widely varying estimates, between 1.5 and 3.6 million people were killed in the war. This photo essay, part one of a three-part series, looks at the earlier stages of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, as well as the growing protest movement, between the years 1962 and 1967

The Bearable and Bees, Zhe Chen

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The Bearable (2007-2010) is Chen’s confessional photo-documentation of her self-harm history spanning half a decade.

Bees (2010-2012) features a collection of people who, faced with chaos, violence, alienation and irredeemable losses in life, feel propelled to leave physical traces and markings on their bodies, in order to testify and preserve a pure and sensitive mind from within. Besides 45 photographs, the project also compromises 40 groups of journals and letters exchanged between Zhe Chen and her subjects in the duration of two years.

The first glance of Zhe Chen‘s work conveys the idea of secrecy and sentiments, under which lies information awaiting exposure and recognition, like an index page pointing towards all the unanswered questions. The viewers will never be in direct communication with the people in the photographs, unfortunately. They can only see the images and read the words. What is the best way to summarize the reason for our existence? After all, we are only human. Zhe Chen feel responsible to be part of this dialogue.

Khaled Abdullah

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peace

 

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