Garry Winogrand

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Garry Winogrand was a street photographer from the Bronx, New York, known for his portrayal of American life, and its social issues, in the mid-20th century. Though he photographed in Los Angeles and elsewhere, Winogrand was essentially a New York photographer. He received three Guggenheim Fellowships to work on personal projects, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and published four books during his lifetime. He was one of three photographers featured in the influential New Documents exhibition at Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1967 and had solo exhibitions there in 1969, 1977 and 1988. He supported himself by working as a freelance photojournalist and advertising photographer in the 1950s and 1960s, and taught photography in the 1970s. His photographs featured in photography magazines including Popular Photography, Eros, Contemporary Photographer and Photography Annual. Photography curator, historian, and critic John Szarkowski called Winogrand the central photographer of his generation. Critic Sean O’Hagan, writing in The Guardian in 2014, said “In the 1960s and 70s, he defined street photography as an attitude as well as a style – and it has laboured in his shadow ever since, so definitive are his photographs of New York.” Phil Coomes, writing for BBC News in 2013, said “For those of us interested in street photography there are a few names that stand out and one of those is Garry Winogrand, whose pictures of New York in the 1960s are a photographic lesson in every frame.” At the time of his death Winogrand’s late work remained undeveloped, with about 2,500 rolls of undeveloped film, 6,500 rolls of developed but not proofed exposures, and about 3,000 rolls only realised as far as contact sheets being made.

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Giuliano Bekor

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Internationally recognized photographer, Giuliano Bekor, holds a portfolio that includes work from the realms of fashion, beauty, celebrity, advertising, and fine art. Giuliano’s photography has been featured in top publications around the globe, and his client list includes an endless file of beauty industry leaders, advertising agencies, celebrities, producers, and artists. With 30 years in the industry, Giuliano has perfected his craft to an exceptional level of expertise. Composed of light, color, space and form, Giuliano brings ideas conceptualized in his own imagination into reality throughout his work. Currently living between New York and Los Angeles, Giuliano is often on the move traveling for work and inspiration. Always the restless visionary, he ceases to continually express his fresh and nuanced style

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Keith Goldstein

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Keith Goldstein was born in Brooklyn, New York. Keith was interested in art for as long as he can remember, with his mother being his biggest influence and supporter, encouraging him in his earliest artistic endeavors. Keith’s first connection with photography came about in high school when he was given a collection of photography magazines to draw from. Instead, he began to read them, becoming extremely fascinated with the medium. It wasn’t until he dropped out of college after his second year, and was working in a warehouse, that he decided on photography as a means to creative expression. Keith began studies at night school with David Attie and moved into New York City, receiving his BFA with Honors in photography from the School of Visual Arts. It was there, working with Tad Yamashiro, that he began to experiment with a more emotive way of expression. Wanting to explore this further, Keith went on to continue his experimentation with Carl Toth at Cranbrook Academy of Art. After receiving his MFA in Photography, he moved back to New York City and began, through a course of personal experiences, to unravel everything that he knew and was for the next 15 years of his life. Keith has been exhibiting his work since 1980. His work has been published in many publications including – ABC News Australia, Now Public, Flak Magazine, JPEG Magazine, File Magazine, Snaps Magazine, SHOTS, Boulevard, Mercury Records, Diversion Magazine, Cadillac Motors, I Magazine, Penquin/Putnam, Simon & Shuster, St. Martin’s Press, and on many book covers. Keith’s tools to finding his place and exploring his feelings towards the world have always been simple – one camera and a couple of lenses. “Being unencumbered does allow you the most freedom”, he says. Keith has been making his living as fine art photographer, a stock shooter, a corporate event photographer, and a photo editor.

Ashley Lebedev

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Ashley Lebedev is a 27 year old Fine Art Photographer, specializing in Conceptual Portraiture & Moodscapes. She’s also a writer and neoclassical or contemporary narratives often accompany her pieces. After briefly attending school for Commercial Photography, Ashley quickly chose to venture away from conventional photographic style and developed a taste for telling stories through her photographs.

“I want every piece I create to evoke a dormant memory or to relay a lingering message. I love drawing upon one’s own memories, by stirring them up a bit, or by recreating ideals that hit a sleeping chord within the viewer. Photography is my bittersweet journal & the visual aftermath of a fragmented life. I hope you enjoy these pieces of me. They are all there.”

Ashley currently resides in the United States and shoots exclusively on location, upon a 12 acre farm. Most of her work is created working with all natural light & organic elements found within nature, while placing a continued emphasis towards designing historical characters and fantasy worlds

Edward Ysais

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Consuelo Kanaga

Consuelo Kanaga - [Untitled] (Horse Drawn Wagon) 1922

Consuelo Kanaga, one of the pioneers of modern American photography, began her career as a photojournalist in 1915 in San Francisco. In the 1920s, Alfred Stieglitz inspired her to develop a more aesthetic approach, and a trip to Europe in 1928 awakened her lifelong preoccupation with European modernist painting and the ways in which that work was influenced by the sculpture of Africa. Kanaga successfully combined a Pictorialist aesthetic with a realist strategy, producing handsomely composed and carefully printed images. She was one of few white American photographers in the 1930s to make artistic portraits of African Americans.

In Frances with a Flower, the focus is so sharp that the slightly rough texture of the woman’s skin, shiny with perspiration at the hairline, seems palpable. The forehead, nose, and cheeks, highlighted by flash, contrast with the deep-set eyes lost in shadow, thus producing a sculptural dimension that turns the photograph into hills and valleys of light. The stark white blossom pressed to the woman’s nose emphasizes the sensuality of her face.

Helen Levitt

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Helen Levitt (August 31, 1913 – March 29, 2009) was an American photographer. She was particularly noted for “street photography” around New York City, and has been called “the most celebrated and least known photographer of her time”.

James Whitlow Delano

Kabuli boys show off their captive bird in the old city, Afghanistan.

I’ve always been strongly affected by the environment, since I was a young child living beside a nuclear research lab in California.  It was not outside of town but in it.  Sometimes we’d hear, and feel, open-air explosions, some of which, I would learn later, contained depleted uranium.  It was the height of the Cold War and people did not ask many questions then.  At 7, we moved to the industrial New York City metropolitan area.  Industrial contamination was so close to our leafy neighborhood, the wind sometimes carried fumes from refineries shattering our Rockwellian pretensions.  Early on, I hatched a plan to move back westward away from the city to where there were mountains and forests; to the Rockies, then California again before landing in Tokyo. Naturally, I suppose, I became a documentary storyteller and a collector of visual evidence from my base in Asia for the past 2 decades.  The documentary work focuses on humanity’s relationship with the environment and the ecological consequences of rapid development in East Asia, including violations of indigenous land and human rights.  On the street, an “out of the corner of the eye” immediacy drives the work to peer beneath the surface at what is unspoken.

The work has been published and exhibited throughout the world and led to four monograph photo books, the first being “Empire: Impressions from China” and the latest on the “Black Tsunami: Japan 2011” on the epoch-changing triple disaster in Japan.  Projects have been cited with the Alfred Eisenstadt Award (from Columbia University and Life Magazine), Leica’s Oskar Barnack, Picture of the Year International, NPPA Best of Photojournalism, PDN and others for work from China, Japan, Afghanistan and Burma (Myanmar), etc.  In 2015, I founded EverydayClimateChange (ECC) Instagram feed, where photographers from 6 continents document global climate change on 7 continents. ECC bears witness that climate change is not happening “over there” but it is also happening right here and right now.  ECC is not a western view on climate change because photographers come from the north, the south; the east and the west; and are as diverse as the cultures in which we were all raised.

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Rodney Smith

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Andrea Star Reese

from the series Chasing Stigma

Andrea Star Reese is a VISURA photojournalist/documentary photographer based in New York, Seattle, and Jakarta.

Recent work includes:

DISORDER (2011-2016), a five-year documentary reportage on abuse against people with psychosocial disabilities in Indonesia was first exhibited and screened at Visa Pour L’Image Perpignan, and Angkor Photo Festival in 2013. In 2016 Images from the essay were used by Human Rights Watch in the 2016 report LIVING IN HELL and as part of the Break The Chains Campaign against shackling.. Disorder was a 2014 finalist for the Manual Rivera-Ortiz Grant and included in American Photography 28: Best pictures from 2011.

URBAN CAVE (2007-2014), a seven-year documentary reportage on unsheltered men and women living underground in New York City was first exhibited at Visa Pour L’Image 2010 where it was a Visa d’Or, Feature nominee. Most recently photographs from Urban Cave were exhibited at Musee de L’Elysee, Lausanne and are part of the museum’s collection. The project received the 2014 David Pike Award for Excellence in Journalism_Photography, and Best Social Documentary from The 2009 New York Photo Festival. Urban Cave was awarded 2nd place from 2014 Kontinent Awards and in 2011, a second place Fotovisura Award. Urban Cave was a finalist for both the 2013 FotoEvidence book award and 2011 POYI: World Understanding Award among other recognitions. The series was included in several exhibitions for FotoEvidence and ReGeneration 2 and exhibited at Theory of the Clouds Gallery, Kobe, Japan, and the 2013 Athens Photo Festival.

The Urban Cave Photo Book, edited by Alison Morley was published in 2015 by FotoEvidence. 

Ms Reese began her career as a filmmaker in 1983 and transitioned to Photojournalism/Documentary Photography in 2007. On staff at the International Center of Photography School, and a tutor at the 2013 Angkor Photo Festival Workshop, Andrea Star Reese is a 2010 fellow in Photography from the New York Foundation for the Arts and a reGeneration2 photographer.

Images from Disorder and Urban Cave have received wide International coverage in print, wire, and media publishing.

Published credits include:

Al Jazeera, AJ+, CNN, CNN.com, Sidney Morning Herald, BBC News Alerts, The Guardian, Time.com, Huffington Post, El Dario, Goteborgs Posten, Irish Examiner, El CIUdadano, Feature Shoot, Business Insider, Lightbox.time.com, Vogue.It, Kompas, Jakarta Post, Media Indonesia, Neue Zucher Zeitung, Le Monde, Liberation, New York Times Lens Blog, Alternatives Internationales, Sunday Times Magazine, Paris Match, The Fader, Le Loop, NPR, Fiasco

Louise Dahl-Wolf

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I believe that the camera is a medium of light, that one actually paints with light. In using the spotlights with reflecting lights, I could control the quality of the forms revealed to build a composition. Photography, to my mind, is not a fine art. It is splendid for recording a period of time, but it has definite limitations, and the photographer certainly hasn’t the freedom of the painter. One can work with taste and emotion and create an exciting arrangement of significant form, a meaningful photograph, but a painter has the advantage of putting something in the picture that isn’t there or taking something out that is there. I think this makes painting a more creative medium.

Louise Dahl-Wolf

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Edward Sheriff Curtis

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The North American Indian

William Eugene Smith

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William Eugene Smith was born in 1918 in Wichita, Kansas. He took his first photographs at the age of 15 for two local newspapers. In 1936 Smith entered Notre Dame University in Wichita, where a special photographic scholarship was created for him. A year later he left the university and went to New York City, and after studying with Helene Sanders at the New York Institute of Photography, in 1937 he began working for News-Week (later Newsweek). He was fired for refusing to use medium-format cameras and joined the Black Star agency as a freelance.

Smith worked as a war correspondent for Flying magazine (1943-44), and a year later for Life. He followed the island-hopping American offensive against Japan, and suffered severe injuries while simulating battle conditions for Parade, which required him to undergo surgery for the next two years.

Once recuperated, Eugene Smith worked for Life again between 1947 and 1955, before resigning in order to join Magnum as an associate. In 1957 he became a full member of Magnum. Smith was fanatically dedicated to his mission as a photographer. Because of this dedication, he was often regarded by editors as ‘troublesome’.

A year after moving to Tucson to teach at the University of Arizona, Smith died of a stroke. His archives are held by the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona. Today, Smith’s legacy lives on through the W. Eugene Smith Fund to promote ‘humanistic photography’, founded in 1980, which awards photographers for exceptional accomplishments in the field

Cindy Sherman

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Bill Perlmutter

© Bill Perlmutter, Galerie Hilaneh von Kories [No image is to be copied, duplicated, modified or redistributed in whole or part without the prior written permission from photoselection GmbH. Fon: +49 40 4232010. mail@galeriehilanehvonkories.de]

BILL PERLMUTTER was born in New York on September 5, 1932. He began his career with a Bachelor of Arts in Motion Picture Techniques from the City College Film Institute in New York.

In 1954 after graduating from the United States Army Photography School, he spend two years in Europe as a staff photographer for the U.S. Army newspapers based in West Germany. Since then he traveled extensively all around the world as a free-lance photographer. From 1978-1997 he worked as the Vice President of Rainbow Chromes, a company specializing in photographic and digital retouching.

Kristen Hatgi

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A Few years ago studying at the Art Institute of Boston I became aware of wet plate collodion and how it was being used by contemporary photographers such as Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman and Sally Mann. I had no idea what it involved or where to begin. All I had heard was “it is difficult and dangerous.” Both sounded right up my ally, but still illusive. Soon after my initial interest, and by great luck, I was introduced to the process by a friend traveling through Denver, Mark Katzman. He made a few portraits of my partner Mark Sink and me.  I was thereafter memorized and completely determined to make them myself. It was now real and possible. I went back to school in Boston and spent those two semesters collecting chemicals, knowledge and equipment. After graduation, Mark and I started off the summer with a huge crash course in wet plate collodion, spending all our free time shooting. Gathering chemicals, equipment, beautiful faces, bodies, flowers, and ideas. We became a team; each being the others inspiration, muse, assistant, plate coater, chemical mixer, costume designer, and lunch maker. Our hands, feet, cloths and often face were marked with silver nitrate stains. It has been my great obsession ever since.

Ethan James Green

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Joyce Tenneson

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Every so often an artist comes along who defies the easy labeling that curators and critics feel obliged to stick on everything under their rapacious gaze. In spite of lacking obvious inspirations and role models, these artists manage to create deeply felt, radical works that an extraordinary number of viewers respond to with fervor and pleasure.”
Karl-Peter Gottschalk, photography critic, on Joyce Tenneson

Tenneson is among the most respected photographers of our time, and has been described critically as “one of America’s most interesting portrayers of the human character.” Her work is a combination of portraiture and mythology-she is interested in discovering the archetypes of our being.

Tenneson’s work has been shown in over 150 exhibitions worldwide, and is part of numerous private and museum collections. Her photographs have appeared on countless covers for magazines such as: Time, Life, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Premiere, Esquire and The New York Times Magazine. She is also a much sought-after portrait photographer with clients in Europe, Japan, and the United States.

Ms. Tenneson is the author of fifteen books. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the International Center of Photography’s Infinity Award, for best applied photography, and the 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Professional Photographers of America. In addition, she has been named “Photographer of the Year” by the international organization, Women in Photography. A recent poll conducted by American Photo Magazine voted Tenneson among the ten most influential women photographers in the history of photography. Joyce lives and works in Rockport, Maine.

Tenneson’s portraits go beyond a surface recording of her subject’s likeness. Her signature-style images attempt to show the inner person who hovers behind the facade. Says Tenneson: “I want to allow others to reveal and celebrate aspects of themselves that are usually hidden. My camera is a witness. It holds a light up for my subjects to help them feel their own essence, and gives them the courage to collaborate in the recording of these revelations.”

Obscurité, Jack Montgomery

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When I was six months old, my parents took my maternal grandmother and me to a small cottage—a shack really—that sat on the shore of a great salt pond on Martha’s Vineyard. The full range of sensory experiences from that time and other visits there were deeply imprinted on my young brain, and they define my greatest pleasures. The smell of the salt air, infused with the sharp iodine of seaweed and the decay of sand and mud exposed at low tide. The simple building, aging shingles, peeling paint, old wood aged to dark chestnut. Roads of sand as fine as powdered sugar, cutting though pine forests with dappled light reaching the ground. All of these things excite me still, 60 years later.

Paul Strand

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Along with Edward Weston and Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand was one of the defining masters of early American modernist photography. Strand was introduced to photography by the renowned social documentarian Lewis Hine, who instilled in him an understanding of the photograph as a powerful tool that should be used for the betterment of humanity. Finding his own vision, in the early 20th century Strand began taking the photographs for which he is best known: scenes of urban hustle and bustle, formal abstractions, and street portraits.