México 1933, Paul Strand

Paul Strand, photographer whose work influenced the emphasis on sharp-focused, objective images in 20th-century American photography.

When he was 17 years old, Strand began to study photography with Lewis W. Hine, who was later noted for his photographs of industrial workers and immigrants. At Hine’s urging, Strand began to frequent “291,” the gallery begun by Alfred Stieglitz, the leader of the Photo-Secession group. There, Strand met Stieglitz and was exposed to the avant-garde paintings of Pablo Picasso, Paul Cézanne, and Georges Braque that were on display in the gallery. These works inspired him to emphasize abstract form and pattern in his photographs, such as Shadow Pattern, New York and Wall Street (both 1915). In one of the boldest photographs of the period, White Fence (1916), Strand deliberately destroyed perspective to build a powerful composition from tonal planes and rhythmic pattern.

Strand rejected the then-popular style of Pictorialism, which emulated the effects of painting in photographs by manipulating negatives and prints, in favour of achieving the minute detail and rich, subtle tonal range afforded by the use of large-format cameras. He relied on strictly photographic methods, realizing that the camera’s objectivity is at once its limitation and its chief asset. The purity and directness of Strand’s depictions of natural forms and architecture presaged the work of other American photographers who sought to express abstract formal values through the unadorned photographic image. Strand’s objective photographs of urban subjects were published by Stieglitz in the last two issues of his influential magazine Camera Work and were given a show at “291.” Much of the work in that show featured everyday objects, such as bowls and furniture, which were sharply lit and shot at such close range that they verge on seeming abstract.

After serving in World War I, Strand collaborated with the painter and photographer Charles Sheeler on the documentary film Mannahatta. While working as a freelance movie cameraman, he devoted his free time to still photography, capturing the beauty of natural forms through dramatic close-ups in Colorado (1926) and Maine (1927–28). In his photographs of the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec (1929) and of New Mexico (1930), he achieved a new understanding of landscape, revealing a deep awareness of what he called “the spirit of place.”

In the 1930s, Strand became increasingly concerned with addressing social issues, and so he switched his focus from photography to motion pictures as a means to reach a greater audience and to tell a clearer story. Appointed chief photographer and cinematographer by the Mexican government in 1933, he made the motion picture Redes (“The Wave”) about Mexican fishermen. He returned to the United States and worked as a cameraman for the director Pare Lorentz on the government-sponsored documentary film The Plow That Broke the Plains (1936). In 1937 Strand formed Frontier Films to make documentaries with social and political content. Of the nonprofit company’s seven films, Strand photographed only Native Land (1942).

After World War II, unhappy with the political situation in the United States, Strand moved to France and worked throughout Europe. From then on, much of his work focused on issues of community life. In his later years he produced a number of photographic books in which he could mimic the effects of film by laying out a narrative sequence of images, often accompanied by text.

John Vachon

Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, John Vachon received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from St. Thomas College at age twenty, followed by further studies at the Catholic University of America (1935–36). After being hired as an assistant messenger with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) in 1937, Vachon quickly developed his own photographic skills. He became a member of the FSA’s regular photographic staff and produced memorable documentary series in the Plains states. After moving to New York, Vachon in 1947 became a member of the Photo League, contributing numerous book reviews to the newsletter Photo Notes and participating in the 1948 exhibition This Is the Photo League. After working for many years as a staff photographer at Look magazine, Vachon became a visiting professor at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1974.

The New Promised Land, Stan Raucher

Stan Raucher was born and raised in Minnesota during the age of black and white television, Life magazine photo documentaries, and the publication of The Family of Man. His photographs have been published in LensWork #117, LensWork #97, Adore Noir, Slate, Lenscratch, Black & White Magazine, The Daily Mail, The Independent, Featureshoot, F-Stop Magazine, Camera Arts, and Datum Seiten der Zeit. His prints have been shown in 20 solo exhibits, included in over 60 juried group shows, and exhibited in the Blue Sky Gallery viewing drawers in 2012, 2014 and 2015. They are in the permanent collections at the Lishui Museum of Photography and the University of Washington Hall Health Center, and held by private collectors.

Stan was a 2015 Px3 Competition Bronze Award Winner, a 2014 PhotoWorld finalist, and a 2014 Havana Times Photo Contest winner. He also was a 2012 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize finalist and a Critical Mass finalist in 2012 and 2013. He received the 2013 Black & White Magazine Excellence Award, the 2013 Grand Prix de la Decouverte International Fine Art Photography Juror Award of Merit, the 2011 Black & White Magazine Merit Award, and First Place in the 2010 NYPH Capture Brooklyn Exhibition. Stan resides in Seattle, Washington, and he is currently working on several photography projects around the world.

Holy Week in Guatemala, Stan Raucher

I’m intrigued by observing ordinary people going about their daily activities in public spaces in countries and cultures around the world. Glimpses of the human condition emerge as individuals interact with one another and their surroundings. An expressive gesture, a telling glance, a concealed mood or hidden emotion may suddenly materialize and then vanish in a split-second. Such ephemeral events are often overlooked or quickly forgotten. My photographs capture these fleeting moments as evocative, richly-layered images that invite the viewer to generate their own personal narratives. At a time when fewer of the images that we see on a routine basis are honest representations of real life, my candid photography opens a window to the world that actually surrounds us here and now.

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Daniella Midenge

Strong women, accentuated by their beauty and sensuality, are the hallmark of fashion photographer Daniella Midenge. Her pictures evoke intimacy and passion, beyond the outer shell. Black-and-white or color, her photos have an incredible power of expression that draws the eye of men and women alike. Her unique style still shows the influence of photographers like Peter Lindbergh and Herb Ritts. As a woman and a model herself, Daniella Midenge is at home both behind and in front of the camera, directing, producing, doing hair and make-up, retouching—all of which she does herself. It’s no wonder she is reluctant to let others handle the processing of her photographs. Growing up in a creative family, her love of images, faces, shapes, and exotic places combined with her work as an oil painting restorer—all contributed to the many twists and turns on Midenge’s path to photography. After her first contact with a camera, she never looked back.

Daniella Midenge is a self-taught photographer and an enthusiast of contrasts. Her first magazine cover was for Marie Claire, shot in New York 2010, starring top models Candice Swanepoel and Behati Prinsloo. Other illustrious magazines in her portfolio include Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and ELLE. Her client base continues to expand with commissions from major companies like H&M and Swarovski.

Andrés Serrano

 

I’ve never called myself a photographer. I studied painting and sculpture and see myself as an artist with a camera. I learned everything I know about art from Marcel Duchamp who taught me that anything, including a photograph, could be a work of art. –Andres Serrano

Bill Eppridge

Bill Eppridge chronicled the 1960s for Life magazine with a series of memorable images, including one of presidential candidate Robert F Kennedy as he lay mortally wounded. Eppridge spent eight years with Life, covering many of seminal events, including the civil rights movement, the Vietnam war, the Beatles’ arrival in the US and Woodstock.

His most searing images came from his coverage of Kennedy’s campaign to win the 1968 Democratic presidential nomination. He followed the candidate across the country, and on 5 June, after Kennedy had won the California primary he addressed a crowd of supporters in the early morning hours at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.

Eppridge was about 12 feet behind Kennedy when he heard gunfire, and saw Kennedy lying on his back, his arms outstretched. “I was suddenly realised that what I was seeing there was an icon, almost. It was almost like a crucifixion.”It was 25 years later, when he was preparing the first of two books about Kennedy, before Eppridge could bear to look at his contact sheets.

He was born in Buenos Aires, where his American father was a chemical engineer with DuPont. He returned with his family to the US as a child and began taking photographs in high school. After graduating in 1960 from the University of Missouri. He went on a nine-month trip around the world for National Geographic, then freelanced before joining Life.

One of his first assignments was to spend six days with the Beatles on their first trip to the US in February 1964. A collection of his photographs of the time, most of them never before seen, will be published next year in The Beatles: Six Days That Changed the World.

Eppridge was an expert in equipment, lighting and other technical elements, but a greater talent may have been the way he immersed himself in a story and earned the confidence of his subjects. In the summer of 1964, he approached the family of James Chaney, one of three civil rights workers killed by white supremacists in Mississippi. He attended Chaney’s funeral, taking a picture of the tear-stained face of his younger brother as he leaned close to his mother.

One of Eppridge’s most remarkable stories came in 1965, when he and Life reporter James Mills spent more than two months with a married pair of heroin addicts on New York’s Upper West Side. The story was the inspiration for the 1971 film The Panic in Needle Park, starring Al Pacino.

After Kennedy’s assassination, Eppridge retreated from the world of politics and conflict. Helater worked for Time and Sports Illustrated.

Joy Goldkind

Joy Goldkind currently resides in St. James, NY. She graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology, NYC in 1963. She has exhibited in numerous venues across the country and internationally including a solo exhibition at the Museo Nationale Della Fotographia in Italy, where a permanent collection of her work is now held. Joy’s photographs have graced the covers of international publications and magazines such as Silver Shotz and Eyemazing. Her work has also been featured in B&W Magazine, Photolife, Zoom Magazine, Color and View Camera Magazine

Metro, Stan Raucher

The B Train at 42nd St, Manhattan


Line 4 near Les Halles, Paris


Line 1 near People’s Square, Shanghai


Tren Ligero near La Noria, Mexico City


Line 2 at Montesanto, Naples


Metro 1 near Swietokrzyska, Warsaw


Blue Line at Noida City Center, Delhi


Brighton Beach Station, Brooklyn


Line 8 near Aculco, Mexico City


Metro 3 Deák Ferenc Tér Station, Budapest


Atlantic Ave MTA Station, Brooklyn


Line 2 near Lujiazui, Shanghai


Line 2 at Klabin, São Paulo


Belleville Metro Station, Paris

I’m intrigued by observing ordinary people going about their daily activities in public spaces in countries and cultures around the world. Glimpses of the human condition emerge as individuals interact with one another and their surroundings. An expressive gesture, a telling glance, a concealed mood or hidden emotion may suddenly materialize and then vanish in a split-second. Such ephemeral events are often overlooked or quickly forgotten. My photographs capture these fleeting moments as evocative, richly-layered images that invite the viewer to generate their own personal narratives. At a time when fewer of the images that we see on a routine basis are honest representations of real life, my candid photography opens a window to the world that actually surrounds us here and now.

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Chris Suspect

The son of a diplomat, Chris Suspect was born in the Philippines in 1968. He is a street and documentary photographer hailing from the Washington, DC area. He specializes in capturing absurd and profound moments in the quotidian. His street photography work has been recognized internationally and has been exhibited in Miami, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Romania, Georgia and the United Kingdom. His documentary work on the underground music scene in Washington, D.C., was published as a book, Suspect Device, by Empty Stretch in 2014 and was a featured exhibit at the Kolga Tblisi Photo Festival 2015 in Tblisi, Georgia. This same project was also featured in the Leica Galerie at Photokina 2014 in Koln, Germany. The work is currently held in the Leica Galerie Archives.

In the last year, Suspect won the StreetFoto San Francisco competition for street series, FotoWeek DC’s competition for Photographer’s Choice series, and Exposed DC’s annual photography competition. He was also a finalist in the Miami Street Photography Festival Miami Photo Series. In previous years he was shortlisted for the International Street Photography Awards (UK) and named the winner of the Washington City Paper’s 2014 Photography Contest. Previously Suspect served as a judge for the Miami Street Photography festival during Miami Art Basel (2013), he won Photo District News’ “The Scene” contest for music photography (2013) and received an honorable mention in the Chicago Photographic Society’s first annual street photography contest (2013).

Suspect’s work has been featured in the Huffington Post, Photo District News, LFI Magazine and on the Leica Camera Blog. He also has published photographs in the Washington Post, Washington City Paper, CNN, The Atlantic, Forbes and many other media outlets in the US, Germany, Canada and Brazil.

Dennis Cox

Dennis Cox is an award winning travel photographer who has photographed in over 100 countries on all seven continents. He markets his stock photography from his own agency, ChinaStock/WorldViews, as well as through Alamy, Getty Images, ImageBrief, and other outlets worldwide.

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Ibarionex Perello

 

Ibarionex Perello is a photographer, writer, educator and host of The Candid Frame Photography podcast. He has over 25 years of experience in the photographic industry.

In his role as host and producer of The Candid Frame, he provides frank, insightful interviews with some of the industry’s top established and emerging photographers. The popular show has featured guests including Jay Maisel, Joel Meyerowitz, Pete Turner, Lynn Goldsmith and Gerd Ludwig and enjoys a following among photo enthusiasts from all over the world. The weekly program is consistently ranked among the top programs of its type.

Ibarionex is also the author of 5 books including: Chasing the Light: Improving Your Photography Using Available Light, 5D Mark III From Snapshot to Great Shots, and Adobe Master Class: Photoshop. He is also the co-author of Visual Stories: Behind the Len with Vincent Laforet and Road to Seeing with Dan Winters.

His photographs and articles have appeared in numerous publications and websites including Digital Photo Pro, Outdoor Photographer, Rangefinder, Shutterbug, Popular Photography, DP Review and Scott Kelby’s Light It magazines.

He an adjunct professor at the Art Center College of Design as well as an instructor at the online photography school, Better Photo.

Debbie Caffery

Caffery has been making photographs of the people and culture of her native Louisiana for over 30 years. Past projects include documentation of sugarcane field and mill workers, alligator hunting, and family portraits in Louisiana, as well as photographs of rural Mexico and Portugal. She will soon publish a new book documenting prostitution in Mexico. Caffery’s work has been included in solo exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, Cleveland Museum of Art, Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Photography, and the Gitterman Gallery, New York.

She has received numerous awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship (2005), the first Lou Stoumen Prize (1996), and the Louisiana Governor’s Art Award (1990). Her work is included in the permanent collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian Institution, Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the New Orleans Museum of Art. Caffery has published several highly praised books, including Polly, The Shadows, and Carry Me Home.

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Arnold Newman

 

Arnold Newman is acknowledged as one of the great masters of the 20th and 21st century and his work has changed portraiture. He is recognized as the “Father of Environmental Portraiture.” His work is collected and exhibited in the major museums around the world including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Chicago Art Institute; The Los Angeles Museum of Art; The Philadelphia Museum; The Tate and the National Portrait gallery, London; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and many other prominent museums in Europe, Japan, South America, Australia, etc.

Newman was an important contributor to publications such as New York, Vanity Fair, LIFE, Look, Holiday, Harper’s Bazaar, Esquire, Town and Country, Scientific American, New York Times Magazine, and many others. There are numerous books published of Newman’s work in addition to countless histories of photography, catalogues, articles and television programs. He received many major awards by the leading professional organizations in the U.S. and abroad including the American Society of Media Photographers, The International Center of Photography, The Lucie Award, The Royal Photographic Society Centenary Award as well as France’s “Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters.” In 2005, Photo District News named Newman as one of the 25 most influential living photographers. In 2006, Newman was awarded The Gold Medal for Photography by The National Arts Club. He is the recipient of nine honorary doctorates and has lectured and conducted workshops throughout the country and the world.

Arnold Newman died on June 6, 2006 in New York City. He was 88 years old.

Danny Lyon

Danny Lyon is a photo-journalist, writer and filmmaker.

Among his many books are The Bikeriders, Conversations with the Dead, and Knave of Hearts. His latest non-fiction book is Like A Thief’s Dream, PowerHouse Books. Daniel Joseph Lyon was born in Brooklyn , New York on March 16, 1942. Roosevelt was President. World War Two was on going in Europe, Africa and Asia. Segregation was the law of the land in 13 southern states. Native Americans were not allowed to purchase alcohol in New Mexico. Most blacks could not or did not vote in the deep south. Lyon attended NYC public schools in Kew Gardens and Forest Hills, Queens, and in 1959 bought his first camera, an Exa SLR in Munich, Germany during a summer trip, then entered the University of Chicago, where he eventually majored in philosophy and ancient history. In 1963 he became The Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee’s (SNCC) first photographer . Danny Lyon’s photographs are in Museums and collections through out the world. His most recent one man show was at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. He regularly shows at the Edwynn Houk Gallery in NYC.

Melodie McDaniel

Melodie McDaniel is a still life, celebrity, advertising photographer and film director.

Melodie’s first professional job was album artwork for Suzanne Vega, which received critical praise and led to further work with such musical artists as Smashing Pumpkins, Mazzy Star, Cat Power, Pharrell Williams, and Lily Allen. She went on to direct music videos, including clips for Annie Lennox, Blonde Redhead, Patti Smith, and Madonna. Melodie signed with The Directors Bureau in 2002. Melodie has since worked on spots for Chevy, Toyota, Vodafone, Zune, and Nike.

Melodie McDaniel continues to maintain a dual career in commercials/music videos and still photography.

Melodie McDaniel has shot editorially for Nylon Magazine, Giant Magazine, Elle, Vogue, Spin Magazine, Dazed & Confused, Interview, 10 Magazine, Jane Magazine, Details and Lula Magazine.

She has photographed celebrities including as Lily Allen, Ludacris, Pharrell Williams, Rihanna, Ryan Gosling, Carrie Underwood, Rob Machado, Robin Tunney.

She also the music video: “Carnival” with Natalie Merchant

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks was an American photographer, musician, writer and film director. He is best remembered for his photographic essays for Life magazine and as the director of the 1971 film, Shaft.

Gordon Parks was one of the seminal figures of twentieth century photography. A humanitarian with a deep commitment to social justice, he left behind a body of work that documents many of the most important aspects of American culture from the early 1940s up until his death in 2006, with a focus on race relations, poverty, Civil Rights, and urban life. In addition, Parks was also a celebrated composer, author, and filmmaker who interacted with many of the most prominent people of his era—from politicians and artists to celebrities and athletes.

Born into poverty and segregation in Kansas in 1912, Parks was drawn to photography as a young man when he saw images of migrant workers published in a magazine. After buying a camera at a pawnshop, he taught himself how to use it and despite his lack of professional training, he found employment with the Farm Security Administration (F.S.A.), which was then chronicling the nation’s social conditions. Parks quickly developed a style that would make him one of the most celebrated photographers of his age, allowing him to break the color line in professional photography while creating remarkably expressive images that consistently explored the social and economic impact of racism.

When the F.S.A. closed in 1943, Parks became a freelance photographer, balancing work for fashion magazines with his passion for documenting humanitarian issues. His 1948 photo essay on the life of a Harlem gang leader won him widespread acclaim and a position as the first African American staff photographer and writer for Life Magazine, then by far the most prominent photojournalist publication in the world. Parks would remain at Life Magazine for two decades, chronicling subjects related to racism and poverty, as well as taking memorable pictures of celebrities and politicians (including Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and Stokely Carmichael). His most famous images, such as Emerging Man, 1952, and American Gothic, 1942, capture the essence of activism and humanitarianism in mid-twentieth century America and have become iconic images, defining their era for later generations. They also rallied support for the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement, for which Parks himself was a tireless advocate as well as a documentarian.

Parks spent much of the last three decades of his life expanding his style, conducting experiments with color photography. He continued working up until his death in 2006, winning numerous awards, including the National Medal of Arts in 1988, and over fifty honorary doctorates. He was also a noted composer and author, and in 1969, became the first African American to write and direct a Hollywood feature film based on his bestselling novel The Learning Tree. This was followed in 1971 by the hugely successful motion picture Shaft. The core of his accomplishment, however, remains his photography the scope, quality, and enduring national significance of which is reflected throughout the Collection. According to Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Center at Harvard University, “Gordon Parks is the most important black photographer in the history of photojournalism. Long after the events that he photographed have been forgotten, his images will remain with us, testaments to the genius of his art, transcending time, place and subject matter.”

Jack Radcliffe

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Streets of the world, Valérie Jardin

 

 

 

Photography changed my life. The day I picked up a camera I became a storyteller. I learned to see the extraordinary in everyday life. And my passion for documenting humankind has led me to find beauty in the most unlikely of places. As a visual storyteller, photographic images are how I tell these stories. Chasing light is my desire, my obsession, my addiction.

Chasing LightThe camera is an extension of my vision. It captures what I see. Images help me tell the story of the light I chase in the urban landscapes I visit. Every time I make an image, I capture a moment in time that will never occur again. Each frame I shoot becomes extraordinary in its uniqueness. The people. The architecture. The light. The shadows. When they come together, they form the stories of the cities that I want to show my students.

Telling StoriesMy love of humankind drives me to wander the city streets tirelessly to capture the candid moments of daily life. These are the everyday moments most people would not see. These are the moments I want to find and tell.

I thrive on searching and waiting for just the right moment when a story unfolds in a single frame; where context and subject intersect with me there, honored to tell its story to the world. And I am happiest when I get lost on purpose, and let the city reveal its magic to me. The urban landscape is always surprising me with the new stories that unfold throughout the day and into the night.

With this, photography continues to change my life.

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Wayne Chinnock

Raised in Tucson Arizona by a mechanical engineering father who loved Mexican food and an amazing bread baking mom, Wayne always had a fondness for the kitchen. His father was also an avid photographer with an in-home darkroom; cameras became instinctual to use by Wayne from childhood into adult life.

Wayne started in the service industry just two days after turning sixteen which became an extended career putting him through college and helping him to travel to 40+ countries. He spent time in the front-of-the-house in restaurants, hotels and catering companies in addition to many hours in the kitchen working the grill and dessert stations. There is almost no position he hasn’t done in the restaurant biz. The service industry has taken him to San Francisco, Dublin, Nantucket, New York and Philadelphia to name a few. He will admit that the energy is infectious.

After all the years of restaurant work coupled with teaching English abroad and acquiring a degree in Psychology (he also spent over 100 hours in the darkroom at the Creative Photography Center at the University of Arizona) Wayne decided to finally settle down with his wife Melodie in the Boston area and put all his energy into photography. He has been creating images full time for more than 10 years. All the while his experience within the service industry and in the kitchen has endeared him to chefs, creative directors, restauranteurs, executives and many more.

Whether he is photographing for a renowned chef, documenting medical relief in Haiti, showcasing the beauty of a new interior space or creating images in the studio, Wayne’s obsession with providing not only a great final product, but a great customer service based experience, is always evident.

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