Donna Ferrato

Donna Ferrato is an internationally-known documentary photographer. Her gifts for exploration, illumination, and documentation coupled with a commitment to revealing the darker sides of humanity, have made her a giant in the medium. She has four books including Living with the Enemy which sold over 40,000 copies, and Love & Lust, published by Aperture. She has participated in over 500 one-woman shows and has received awards such as the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanistic Photography (1987), the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism (2003), and the Gender Fairness Award from the New York State Supreme Court Judges (2009). She founded a non-profit called Domestic Abuse Awareness for over a decade and in 2014 launched a campaign called I Am Unbeatable, which features women who have left their abusers. In November 2016, TIME magazine announced her photograph of a woman being hit by her husband (1982) as one of the “100 Most Influential Photographs of All Time.” Currently, Ferrato is documenting her rapidly-changing New York neighborhood of Tribeca for a new book, and leads experimental photo workshops called The Erotic Eye.

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Harold Eugene Edgerton

 

 

 

 

 

Harold Eugene Edgerton, born in Fremont, Nebraska, on April 6, 1903, was the inventor of stroboscopic photography. Beginning in 1921, he studied electric engineering at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, later at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. There he worked as an assistant in 1927 and from 1928-68 as a professor. Edgerton’s uncle taught him the basics of photography when he was 15.

Amber Rose Ortolano

Born in Honolulu, Hawaii, Amber has traveled across the United States throughout most of her childhood. At 16, she has been featured in and interviewed for numerous magazines and websites.

“I hope people see themselves. Each one of my photos is a small moment, and they will all add up to one life, and I really hope people see that; it’s not just about being beautiful or pleasing to the eye, I want people to experience a rush of feelings, as if their whole life is flashing before them.”

Amber currently lives in New York.

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Ami Vitale

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In the beginning, photography was my passport to meeting people, learning, and experiencing new cultures. Now it is more than just a passport. It’s a tool for creating awareness and understanding across cultures, communities, and countries; a tool to make sense of our commonalities in the world we share.

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Nicholas Nixon




Nicholas Nixon, born in 1947, is known for the ease and intimacy of his black and white large format photography. Nixon has photographed porch life in the rural south, schools in and around Boston, cityscapes, sick and dying people, the intimacy of couples, and the ongoing annual portrait of his wife, Bebe, and her three sisters (which he began in 1975). Recording his subjects close and with meticulous detail facilitates the connection between the viewer and the subject. Nixon has been awarded three National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and two Guggenheim Fellowships. In 2014, Nixon’s annual portrait series, The Brown Sisters, reached its 40th anniversary and was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art. In Summer 2013 Nixon’s book Close Far was released by Steidl. The body of work explores the relationship of the self in physical and psychological proximity to the urban landscape. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston exhibited Nicholas Nixon: Family Album, through May 2011. In 2006, Nixon’s ongoing portrait of the Brown sisters was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas. In 2005 Nixon had a solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and the Cincinnati Art Museum. Nixon’s work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, among many others.

 

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Wayne F. Miller

 

 

 

 

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Wayne F. Miller (September 19, 1918 – May 22, 2013) was an American photographer known for his series of photographs The Way of Life of the Northern Negro. Active as a photographer from 1942 until 1975, he was a contributor to Magnum Photos beginning in 1958.

David Guttenfelder

David Guttenfelder is a National Geographic Photographer focusing on geopolitical conflict, conservation and culture.

Guttenfelder has spent more than 20 years as a photojournalist and documentary photographer based in Nairobi, Abidjan, New Delhi, Jerusalem and Tokyo covering world events in nearly 100 countries. In 2011, he helped open a bureau in North Korea for the AP, the first western news agency to have an office in the otherwise-isolated country. Guttenfelder has made more than 40 trips to North Korea.

Guttenfelder is a eight-time World Press Photo Award winner and a seven-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is the 2013 ICP Infinity Prize winner for photojournalism and a winner of the Overseas Press Club of America John Faber, Olivier Rebbot, & Feature Photography awards. Pictures of the Year International and the NPPA have named him Photojournalist of the Year. In 2016, a photograph of his made in North Korea was named among TIME Magazine’s “100 Most Influential Photographs Ever Taken”.

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Steven Lyon

Steven Lyon is an artist hailing from the beaches of California.. For over three decades, Steven has engineered a creative legacy both in front of and behind the camera. The start of his career saw Lyon as the face for designers such as Gianni Versace, Claude Montana, Jean Paul Gaultier, Cerruti, and Trussardi .

He bought his first camera in 1998 and moved to Paris to re-immerse himself in the Paris fashion world, this time behind the lens. Using film as his medium and drawing inspiration from cinema and the iconic photographers of the ‘80’s, he developed his own signature style and established himself as an irreverent, borderline rebel in today’s homogenized fashion world. He quickly developed a rich, intimate and cinematic aesthetic and contributed to publications such as Vanity Fairy, GQ, Vogue, S Magazine, Treats and 25, amongst many others. His work has been exhibited in numerous galleries worldwide.

In 2012, Steven founded a registered 501c3 nonprofit organization called Lyonheartlove. For the past 3 years, Lyon has been filming a full-length feature documentary in Africa called,
“Something that Matters.” The documentary takes a raw, first-hand look at the escalating crisis of poaching and corruption, which threatens extinction to the entire Rhino species. “Something that Matters” is the inaugural project under the auspices of Lyonheartlove. Lyon is also currently at work on producing and directing a book and documentary called, “Kings of the Catwalk: Project 80’s” – a project highlighting the top male models of the 80’s and how HIV effected their lives and changed the industry at its most glamorous time in history. This marks another project under the Lyonheartlove banner. Proceeds from the book will go to AIDS research.

Lyon’s directorial work has been noticed by a variety of international film festivals. His music video “Fire” for the band The Winery Dogs was the official selection for both “New York Film Week”, “The Mexico International Fashion Film Festival”and the “Los Angeles International Film Festival.” It garnered top prize in “Hollywood International Motion Picture Film Festival.” His sultry sexy short film “Remember Cuba” has recently been selected for the “Los Angeles CineFest.”

Steven currently resides in NYC and Paris with his legendary, man’s best friend – Rudy.

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the space between, Jennifer Shaw

 

I am photographing my life. It is as simple and complex as that. Presently, my life is overrun by exquisite little creatures known as children. As they explore the elements with carefree abandon, I observe with camera poised, balanced between protection and permission.

I work from a place of intuition, capturing the action as it unfolds and stealing sidelong glances at the details of our environments. The images are juxtaposed to create an introspective narrative, mining the richly ambiguous state of parenthood, akin to the murky realm between a river’s glittering surface and its hidden undercurrents. Through the camera’s lens I am transported, traversing the spaces between shadow and light, dreams and reality, delight and disquiet.

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All Bodies Are Beautiful, Thomas Dodd

Thomas Dodd is a visual artist and photographer based out of Atlanta, Georgia who has developed a style that he calls “painterly photo montage” – a method he employs in editing software in which he crafts elaborately textured pieces that have a very organic and decidedly non-digital look to them. His work often has mythic and quasi-religious themes that pay homage to Old Master art traditions while at the same time drawing from psychological archetypes that evoke a strong emotional response from the viewer.
Although his artwork resembles paintings, his pieces are entirely photographic in nature, fusing many images into a cohesive whole. His larger works are often presented in a mixed media form that adds a depth and texture that complements the photography beautifully.

Thomas began his career as a visual artist in 2005. Before that, he was best known as the harpist and songwriter for the 1990s musical group Trio Nocturna, a Celtic Gothic ensemble that put out three critically-acclaimed albums (“Morphia”, “Tears of Light” and “Songs of the Celtic Night”) and performed at author Anne Rice’s annual Halloween balls in New Orleans, as well as spawning an offshoot band called the Changelings. Thomas also played harp on two albums by Michael Gira (the driving force behind the influential post-punk band the Swans) – “the Body Lovers” and the Angels of Light “New Mother”.
The images that Thomas creates are basically a visual equivalent of the music he composed in the 1990s. Mythic themes and their relation to emotions and psychological states continue to be his primary subjects and motivations

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Todd Webb

 


Todd Webb was an American photographer notable for documenting everyday life and architecture in cities such as New York City, Paris as well as from the American west. His photography has been compared with Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, and the French photographer Eugène Atget. He traveled extensively during his long life and had important friendships with artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams and Harry Callahan. He photographed famous people including Dorothea Lange. His life was like his photos in the sense of being seemingly simple, straightforward, but revealing complexity and depth upon a closer examination. Capturing history, his pictures often transcend the boundary between photography and artistic expression.

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Glenn Capers

I’ve come to realize that my art has diversity with powerful individual vision, that chronicles the life of individuals. People draw me into their lives to tell their story to anyone willing to listen and validate their reason for living. My attraction to story telling grew as my life developed behind a camera. I discovered that it’s not how a photographer looks at the world that is important, it’s their relationship with their fellow human beings and these moments of connectivity that are frozen in time for all to see.

I am now teaching street photography and journalism around the world. Helping people to find their stories after they identify their personal pilgrimage.

As a photographer I have won a John F Kennedy award, Leica Medal of Excellence for outstanding achievement in Humanistic Photojournalism, NPPA region 10, award, and many more

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Harry Callahan

Born in 1912, Harry Callahan grew up in Detroit, Michigan. He studied engineering at Michigan State College. In 1946, he was appointed by László Moholy-Nagy to teach photography at the Institute of Design in Chicago. Harry Callahan retired in 1977, at which time he was teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design. Harry Callahan’s work has been widely collected in such prestigious institutions such as the Corcoran Gallery of Art, George Eastman House, Smithsonian American Art Museum and The High Museum of Art.

Reed Young

Reed Young is a New York-based photographer. Through colorful portrait essays he tells stories of people and places that fascinate him, with a particular focus on those whose narratives typically live outside the spotlight. Recently these have ranged from the voice actors that dub popular Hollywood films into Italian, to a town that resides in a single building in rural Alaska. Reed’s stories have been featured by The New Yorker, The New York Times, National Geographic, TIME magazine, NPR, Wired and The Guardian

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George Holz

George Holz was born in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (aka “the Secret City”), graduated from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, and assisted for Helmut Newton, whom he credits with guiding his career. As a fledgling photographer, he lived in Milan and Paris, where he shot beauty and fashion for major European magazines such as Italian Vogue and French Elle. Afterward, he moved to New York City, where he set up his famous studio on Lafayette Street, traveling frequently to Los Angeles and Europe to shoot fashion, advertising, and portraiture for major publications such as Vanity Fair and Harper’s Bazaar. His fine-art nudes have been exhibited in galleries and museums around the world. His shows have included “Original Sin” and “Three Boys from Pasadena – A Tribute to Helmut Newton” with fellow Art Center alumni Just Loomis and Mark Arbeit. Holz has collected a variety of prestigious industry awards over the years including a Grammy and a Clio.

Holz works as an adjunct professor and lectures internationally at museums and universities, mentoring young photographers and passing on his photographic aspirations to “always begin and end with light, ” to “do it all in-camera,” and to “bring modern photography back to the level of the artful burn and dodge of the past.”

Holz continues to travel extensively for his commercial work, fine-art shows, and lectures, and is currently working on several projects, including his upcoming book of nudes. He presently bases in the rustic Catskill Mountains of New York, where he lives on a farm with his family, two dogs, and flock of East Friesian sheep. When not exploring remote locations and photographing his muses, George’s favorite pastimes include traveling the American backroads in his ’58 Airstream and conversing with his chocolate lab, Ruby.

Vivian Maier

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Deborah Turbeville

Deborah Turbeville has brought her distinct, intensely personal vision to a body of work. Turbeville’s work first appeared in Vogue in the 1970’s. She has been acknowledged as a dominant figure in contemporary photography, bringing an entirely original vision to the art. She has had inumerable exhibitions throughout the world.

Deborah Turbeville was a fashion editor turned photographer, and her work appears regularly in French and Italian Vogue. She has received numerous awards and has had museum exhibitions in France, Japan, Mexico, and the United States.

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Michael Ackerman

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Michael Ackerman, is an American photographer. Born in 1967 in Tel Aviv. Lives in Warsaw.
Since his first exhibition, in 1999, Michael Ackerman has made his mark by bringing a new, radical and unique approach. His work on Varanasi, entitled “End Time City,” breaks away from all sorts of exoticism or any anecdotal attempt at description, to question time and death with a freedom granted by a distance from the panoramic – whose usage he renewed – to squares or rectangles.
In black and white, with permanent risk that led him to explore impossible lighting, he allowed the grainy images to create enigmatic and pregnant visions. Michael Ackerman seeks – and finds – in the world he traverses, reflections of his personal malaise, doubts and anguish. He received the Nadar Award for his book “End Time City” in 1999, and the Infinity Award for Young Photographer by the International Center of Photography in 1998.
In 2009, he won the SCAM Roger Pic Award for his series “Departure, Poland”.
His last book “Half Life” has been published in 2010 by Robert Delpire.
Michael Ackerman is represented by Gallery VU’

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Sandy Honig

Sandy Honig is a photographer living in New York City. She currently attends New York University, and has worked in the NBC Photo Department and in Saturday Night Live’s photography department. Her photos are character studies of individuals she meets, creates, or secretly steals photos of on the streets.

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Carolyn Cole

Carolyn Cole (born April 24, 1961) is a staff photographer for the Los Angeles Times. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography in 2004, for her coverage of the siege of Monrovia, the capital of Liberia.
Cole graduated from The University of Texas in 1983 with a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in photojournalism. She earned her Master of Arts degree from the School of Visual Communication within the Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University. She began her career in 1986 as a staff photographer with the El Paso Herald-Post, a position which she occupied until 1988. She then moved to the San Francisco Examiner for two years, before spending another two years as a freelance photographer in Mexico City, working with newspapers such as the Los Angeles Times, Detroit Free Press, and Business Week. In 1992, Cole returned to being a staff photographer, working for The Sacramento Bee, before moving to the Times in 1994.
In 1994, the same year she moved to the Times, she was recognized in their editorial awards for her pictures of the crisis in Haiti. The following year, she was recognized again, this time for her work in Russia.
In 1997, she gained attention for her photographs of dying bank robber Emil Matasareanu, who had been shot after a nationally televised shootout with police. Her evidence was used in the wrongful death lawsuit filed by his family. Her pictures also helped the Times win a Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the event. Later that year, she was named Journalist of the Year by the Times Mirror Corporation.
Cole has also had difficulties with the law. In April 2000, she was arrested on felony charges for “throwing deadly missiles” at police during protests in Miami’s “Little Havana,” at the height of the Elián González affair. Her critics alleged that this was an attempt to fire up the crowd in order to gain more shocking pictures. All charges were dropped, though, for lack of evidence.
Cole spent time in Kosovo during the 1999 crisis, and in 2001, spent two months in Afghanistan. In 2002, she received the National Press Photographers Association Newspaper Photographer of the Year award for the first time.
In 2002, Cole covered the beginnings of the prominent siege of Bethlehem’s Church of the Nativity, which had been occupied by Palestinian militants. Then, on May 2, she made a last-minute decision to join a group of peace activists who entered the building in solidarity with the Palestinians. Over the nine days that followed, she doubled as a news reporter for the Times, filing several stories. She was the only photojournalist in the building itself. The pictures she took earned her a nomination for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize.
In mid-2003, Cole went to Liberia, as rebels surrounded the capital, Monrovia, demanding the resignation of President Charles Taylor. This trip was to earn her the 2004 Pulitzer Prize, “for her cohesive, behind-the-scenes look at the effects of civil war in Liberia, with special attention to innocent citizens caught in the conflict.” She won the 2003 George Polk Award for photojournalism. In 2004, Cole was named both NPPA Newspaper Photographer of the Year for a second time, for her work in both Liberia and Iraq, and the Pictures of the Year International Newspaper Photographer by the University of Missouri’s Missouri School of Journalism. This made her the first person ever to win all three of America’s top photojournalism awards in the same year. During the year, she also spent time in Haiti, witnessing the fall of the regime of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Cole has also received the Robert Capa Gold Medal from the Overseas Press Club in both 2003 and 2004, and won two World Press Photo awards in 2004.
In 2007, she won the NPPA Newspaper Photographer of the Year.