Jay Maisel

After studying painting and graphic design at Cooper Union and Yale, Jay Maisel began his career in photography in 1954. While his portfolio includes the likes of Marilyn Monroe and Miles Davis, he is perhaps best known for capturing the light, color, and gesture found in everyday life.
Some of his commercial accomplishments include five Sports Illustrated swimsuit covers, the first two covers of New York Magazine, the cover of Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue (the best-selling jazz album of all time), twelve years of advertising with United Technologies, and awards from such organizations as International Center for Photography, American Society of Media Photographers, Art Directors Club, Professional Photographers of America, and The Cooper Union.
Since he stopped taking on commercial work in the late ’90s, Jay has continued to focus on his personal work. He has developed a reputation as a giving and inspiring teacher as a result of extensive lecturing and photography workshops throughout the country. He also continues to sell prints, which can be found in private, corporate, and museum collections.

Donald Higgs

Donald is a professional photographer based just a short drive outside of Portland, Oregon. His unique style of composition and his keen sense of light has gained him vast notoriety, resulting in his images being published around the world for more than 20 years.

Garry Winogrand

 

 

 

 

Garry Winogrand was a street photographer from the Bronx, New York, known for his portrayal of American life, and its social issues, in the mid-20th century. Though he photographed in Los Angeles and elsewhere, Winogrand was essentially a New York photographer. He received three Guggenheim Fellowships to work on personal projects, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and published four books during his lifetime. He was one of three photographers featured in the influential New Documents exhibition at Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1967 and had solo exhibitions there in 1969, 1977 and 1988. He supported himself by working as a freelance photojournalist and advertising photographer in the 1950s and 1960s, and taught photography in the 1970s. His photographs featured in photography magazines including Popular Photography, Eros, Contemporary Photographer and Photography Annual. Photography curator, historian, and critic John Szarkowski called Winogrand the central photographer of his generation. Critic Sean O’Hagan, writing in The Guardian in 2014, said “In the 1960s and 70s, he defined street photography as an attitude as well as a style – and it has laboured in his shadow ever since, so definitive are his photographs of New York.” Phil Coomes, writing for BBC News in 2013, said “For those of us interested in street photography there are a few names that stand out and one of those is Garry Winogrand, whose pictures of New York in the 1960s are a photographic lesson in every frame.” At the time of his death Winogrand’s late work remained undeveloped, with about 2,500 rolls of undeveloped film, 6,500 rolls of developed but not proofed exposures, and about 3,000 rolls only realised as far as contact sheets being made.

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Jim Ferguson

Born cross-eyed, corrective surgery left me with no depth perception. Being stereo-blind and lacking stereopsis (the ability to see in 3D), I developed a different way of seeing things, and measuring spaces, layers and distances that I use in my photography. I’ve taken my handicap and turned it into an advantage.
I studied photography and received a BFA from San Francisco Art Institute and MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. After getting my BFA, I started exhibiting and selling my work. I landed three galleries representing my work. As a result my work is in the collections of the Dallas Museum of Art, Seattle Art Museum, Museo Nacional de Antropologia- Mexico, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, and numerous private collections. The Amon Carter Museum of American Art included me in the exhibition Exploring Sight: Young Photographers in the 1970s. I was also included in the Macmillan Biographical Encyclopedia of Photographic Artists & Innovators.
I took an extended leave of absence from exhibiting but not photographing. Now I’m bringing the years of images and recent work back into the fine art photography world.

Jim Ferguson’s Website

Enrico Natali

Enrico Natali was born in 1933 in Utica, New York. He grew up and attended public schools in Carthage, a village located in the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains. In 1951 he developed an interest in photography while a cadet at the United States Coast Guard Academy. He left the academy in 1954 and shortly thereafter went to work for New York illustrator/photographer Anton Bruehl.
In 1960 he made a series of photographs of people in the New York City subway. These photographs significantly transcended his previous work and convinced him that photography was his vocation and America his subject. The work from this project recently resulted in the publication, New York City Subway, 1960 (Nazraeli Press, 2012).
From the 1960’s on he lived and photographed in various parts of the country, including New Orleans, Chicago and Detroit. Natali’s Detroit photographs were published in book form in 2013, titled Detroit, 1968 (Foggy Notion Books). In 1971 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and during this period he also produced a series of portraits published as New American People (Morgan & Morgan, New York, 1972). In the following years he traveled extensively in the United States, making a series of photographs that, together with the work of photographer Mark Sandrof, was published under the title American Landscapes (Panopticon Press, Boston, 1991).
In the late 1960s he began a meditation practice that eventually became his primary focus and culminated in his abandoning photography and devoting himself to that practice while raising a family and building a home in the wilds of California’s Los Padres National Forest. In 1990 he and his wife, Nadia, started a Zen meditation center that is now called the Blue Heron Center for Integral Studies.
In the year 2000 his 15-year-old son, Andrei, suggested that they go on a photography trip that, together with the new digital technology, reawakened his interest in photographing. The following year he began the project Just Looking.

Nina Berman

Nina Berman is a documentary photographer, filmmaker, author and educator. Her wide-ranging work looks at American politics, militarism, post violence trauma and resistance. Her photographs and videos have been exhibited at more than 100 venues from the security walls of the Za’atari refugee camp to the Whitney Museum of American Art. She is the author of Purple Hearts – Back from Iraq, (2004) portraits and interviews with wounded American veterans, Homeland, (2008) an examination of the militarization of American life post September 11, and, An autobiography of Miss Wish (2017) a story told with a survivor of sexual violence which was shortlisted for both the Aperture and Arles book prizes. Additional fellowships, awards and grants include: the New York Foundation for the Arts, the World Press Photo Foundation, Pictures of the Year International, the Open Society Foundation, the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, the MIT Knight Science Journalism Fellowship and the Aftermath Project. She is a Professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism where she directs the photography program. She lives in her hometown of New York City

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Matt Black

Matt Black lives in California’s Central Valley, a rural, agricultural area in the heart of the state. He started photography at his hometown newspaper. His work has focused on themes of geography, inequality, and the environment in his native region and in related places.
Since 2015, he has travelled over 100,000 miles across 46 states for his project American Geography. Other works include The Dry Land, about the impact of drought on California’s agricultural communities, and The Monster in the Mountains, about the disappearance of 43 students in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero. Both these projects, accompanied by short films, were published by The New Yorker.
He is a member of Magnum Photos. His work has appeared regularly in TIME Magazine, The New Yorker, The California Sunday Magazine, and other publications. He has been honored three times by the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Prize, including their top honor for journalism. In 2015, he received the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Award for Humanistic Photography, and was named a senior fellow at the Emerson Collective
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John Stanmeyer

John Stanmeyer, born in Illinois, is a founder member of the VII photo agency.
Over the last decade, Stanmeyer has worked nearly exclusively with National Geographic, producing more than 12 stories for the magazine. Between 1998 and 2008, John was a contract photographer for Time magazine, during which time he photographed the war in Afghanistan, the fight for independence in East Timor, the fall of Suharto in Indonesia, and other significant world news events. His years with Time resulted in 18 covers of the magazine.
Stanmeyer has been the recipient of numerous honors, including the prestigious Robert Capa award (Overseas Press Club), Magazine Photographer of the Year (POYi), and numerous World Press, Picture of the Year and NPPA awards. In 2008, his National Geographic cover story on global malaria received a National Magazine Award, and in 2012 he was nominated for an Emmy with the VII documentary film series, ‘Starved for Attention’.

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Enrico Natali

Enrico Natali was born in Utica, New York and raised in the town of Carthage at the edge of the Adirondack Mountains. In 1951 he entered the United States Coast Guard Academy, where he developed an interest in photography. Leaving the academy in 1954 he moved to New York and began working as an apprentice to photographer Anton Bruehl. In 1960, Natali began photographing in New York’s subways, taking black and white candid shots of people on the trains and waiting in the underground stations. Echoing the photographs of Walker Evans, who covertly photographed New York subway riders in the late 1930s, and anticipating the work of artists like Bruce Davidson, who made his first lengthy color series in the New York subway in the early 1980s, Natali’s photographs contribute to a growing body of photographs that look closely at the subway as a crucial site of modern urban life.
The Subway photographs were Natali’s first major series, and according to the artist they prompted him to adopt photography as a vocation and to take America, broadly considered, as the central subject of his work. In the following years Natali lived in different parts of the United States, working either as a freelance or a commercial studio photographer. in 1971, Natali had also started a new series, American Landscapes, supported by a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. The following year he published the book New American People, which collects selections of the photographs he had taken in these various locations. In the mid-1970s Natali stopped making photographs entirely and in 1980 he purchased land in Los Padres National Forest in California, relocating there with his wife and children. In 1990 he and his wife founded a Zen meditation center, which is still in operation today. Natali began to take photographs again in 2001, working in color and using a digital camera.

Sam Wolson

Sam Wolson is an award winning immersive film director, photographer, and Pulitzer Center Grantee, with partners including National Geographic, The New York Times and The New Yorker. His projects have premiered at festivals across the globe, including at Sundance, SXSW and CPH:DOX. In 2021 he premiered his new VR documentary film Reeducated, in partnership with The New Yorker, the Pulitzer Center, Eyebeam and ONA. The multi-part immersive project is the most ambitious immersive interactive feature that The New Yorker created to date. Reeducated went on to win a Special Jury Recognition for Immersive Journalism in the Virtual Cinema Competition at SXSW. In 2019 and 2020 he was awarded a Knight Foundation grant in for his immersive documentary film projects. In 2017, he co-directed the VR film “We Who Remain”, which was the first character-driven VR film shot in an active war zone — in the Nuba mountains of Sudan. It premiered at SXSW, won best VR film at SIFF and was a co-production between Emblematic Group, The New York Times, AJ+, and ARTE.

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Matt Black

Matt Black lives in California’s Central Valley, a rural, agricultural area in the heart of the state. He started photography at his hometown newspaper. His work has focused on themes of geography, inequality, and the environment in his native region and in related places.
Since 2015, he has travelled over 100,000 miles across 46 states for his project American Geography. Other works include The Dry Land, about the impact of drought on California’s agricultural communities, and The Monster in the Mountains, about the disappearance of 43 students in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero. Both these projects, accompanied by short films, were published by The New Yorker.
He is a member of Magnum Photos. His work has appeared regularly in TIME Magazine, The New Yorker, The California Sunday Magazine, and other publica
tions. He has been honored three times by the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Prize, including their top honor for journalism. In 2015, he received the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Award for Humanistic Photography, and was named a senior fellow at the Emerson Collective.

Charles Fenno Jacobs

Jacobs was born in Waltham, Massachusetts.
Reaching his majority, he joined the Merchant Marines and traveled the world for a period of years. After leaving the Merchant Marines, he moved to New York where he married his first wife, Kit, and began his career as a photographer by taking pictures for a commercial real estate firm. With his first 35mm camera, he also began taking candid shots of New Yorkers and of New York and began going to magazine offices, offering to work for practically nothing, according to his third wife, Gloria, who was at the time of their meeting a Fortune magazine researcher. His particular talent was in catching his subjects at their most revealing moments. He became a photographer for Time, Inc. and was soon traveling as a photographer throughout South America as well as the United States, taking pictures for Life, National Geographic, U.S. Camera and Fortune.

Enrico Natali

Enrico Natali was born in Utica, New York and raised in the town of Carthage at the edge of the Adirondack Mountains. In 1951 he entered the United States Coast Guard Academy, where he developed an interest in photography. Leaving the academy in 1954 he moved to New York and began working as an apprentice to photographer Anton Bruehl. In 1960, Natali began photographing in New York’s subways, taking black and white candid shots of people on the trains and waiting in the underground stations. Echoing the photographs of Walker Evans, who covertly photographed New York subway riders in the late 1930s, and anticipating the work of artists like Bruce Davidson, who made his first lengthy color series in the New York subway in the early 1980s, Natali’s photographs contribute to a growing body of photographs that look closely at the subway as a crucial site of modern urban life.
The Subway photographs were Natali’s first major series, and according to the artist they prompted him to adopt photography as a vocation and to take America, broadly considered, as the central subject of his work. In the following years Natali lived in different parts of the United States, working either as a freelance or a commercial studio photographer. in 1971, Natali had also started a new series, American Landscapes, supported by a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. The following year he published the book New American People, which collects selections of the photographs he had taken in these various locations. In the mid-1970s Natali stopped making photographs entirely and in 1980 he purchased land in Los Padres National Forest in California, relocating there with his wife and children. In 1990 he and his wife founded a Zen meditation center, which is still in operation today. Natali began to take photographs again in 2001, working in color and using a digital camera.

Albert Levy

Albert Levy

Photos

Tom Zimberoff

Tom Zimberoff was born in Los Angeles, a child of the Fifties. He was raised there and in Las Vegas, Nevada. As proficient with a clarinet as with a camera, he succumbed to the lure of photography while studying music at the USC School of Performing Arts. “Portrait photography,” he says, “is a predatory sport. I stalk my prey like a big-game hunter, look for a good clean shot, and try to avoid unnecessary wounds. Then I hang their heads on a wall to admire like trophies.”

Having begun his career in rock ‘n roll photography, touring with The Jackson-5, Stevie Wonder, The Rolling Stones, and Stephen Stills among others, he moved over to television and motion picture stills for advertising. After that he embarked on a career in photojournalism, spending several years in, among many other places, Central America working for Time and other magazines as a member of the Sygma Photo Agency and, later, Gamma-Liaison. His photographs have appeared on the covers of Time, Fortune, Money, People, and numerous other magazines.

Zimberoff portraits are found in the collections of the National Portrait Gallery in London, the Israel Museum in Tel Aviv, the Corcoran Gallery Of Art in Washington, DC, the Oakland Museum in California, the Los Angeles Public Library, the Los Angeles County Museum Of Art, the Canton Art Institute in Ohio, the Performing Arts Library & Museum in San Francisco, as well as several corporate collections and university libraries. His first two portrait subjects were Marx and Lennon — that’s Groucho and John, of course.

Annie Flanagan

Annie is a freelance photographer, journalist and educator. Their work primarily focuses on gender, sexuality, identity and trauma in the United States. Annie received a Master of Science from S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communication at Syracuse University.

Keith Carter

Keith Carter is an internationally respected author, educator, and workshop leader. He has published 13 books of his expressive images. Thirteen monographs of his work have been published, as well as two documentary films: Keith Carter: The Artist Series, Ted Forbes and A Certain Alchemy, Anthropy Arts. A fifty-year retrospective book was released fall of 2019 from University of Texas Press. In addition, he has been described as a “Poet of the Ordinary” by the Los Angeles Times (1994) and received the Texas Medal of Arts in 2009.

His work has been featured on the nationally televised program CBS Sunday Morning and he is the recipient of the Lange-Taylor Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Mr. Carter’s work is included in numerous private and public collections including the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the George Eastman House, and the Wittliff Collections at Texas State University. 

 

Tony Marciante

Photos

James Jowers

James Jowers was an American street photographer.
Jowers began receiving training in photography and darkroom techniques while serving in the United States Army. While working the night shift as a porter at St. Luke’s Hospital, he would spend his free time during the day roaming the streets of his Lower East Side neighborhood and the rest of Manhattan, capturing a gritty, funny, and idiosyncratic view of the city.