Sandy Honig


Sandy Honig is a photographer living in New York City. She currently attends New York University, and has worked in the NBC Photo Department and in Saturday Night Live’s photography department. Her photos are character studies of individuals she meets, creates, or secretly steals photos of on the streets.


Carolyn Cole


Carolyn Cole (born April 24, 1961) is a staff photographer for the Los Angeles Times. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography in 2004, for her coverage of the siege of Monrovia, the capital of Liberia.
Cole graduated from The University of Texas in 1983 with a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in photojournalism. She earned her Master of Arts degree from the School of Visual Communication within the Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University. She began her career in 1986 as a staff photographer with the El Paso Herald-Post, a position which she occupied until 1988. She then moved to the San Francisco Examiner for two years, before spending another two years as a freelance photographer in Mexico City, working with newspapers such as the Los Angeles Times, Detroit Free Press, and Business Week. In 1992, Cole returned to being a staff photographer, working for The Sacramento Bee, before moving to the Times in 1994.
In 1994, the same year she moved to the Times, she was recognized in their editorial awards for her pictures of the crisis in Haiti. The following year, she was recognized again, this time for her work in Russia.
In 1997, she gained attention for her photographs of dying bank robber Emil Matasareanu, who had been shot after a nationally televised shootout with police. Her evidence was used in the wrongful death lawsuit filed by his family. Her pictures also helped the Times win a Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the event. Later that year, she was named Journalist of the Year by the Times Mirror Corporation.
Cole has also had difficulties with the law. In April 2000, she was arrested on felony charges for “throwing deadly missiles” at police during protests in Miami’s “Little Havana,” at the height of the Elián González affair. Her critics alleged that this was an attempt to fire up the crowd in order to gain more shocking pictures. All charges were dropped, though, for lack of evidence.
Cole spent time in Kosovo during the 1999 crisis, and in 2001, spent two months in Afghanistan. In 2002, she received the National Press Photographers Association Newspaper Photographer of the Year award for the first time.
In 2002, Cole covered the beginnings of the prominent siege of Bethlehem’s Church of the Nativity, which had been occupied by Palestinian militants. Then, on May 2, she made a last-minute decision to join a group of peace activists who entered the building in solidarity with the Palestinians. Over the nine days that followed, she doubled as a news reporter for the Times, filing several stories. She was the only photojournalist in the building itself. The pictures she took earned her a nomination for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize.
In mid-2003, Cole went to Liberia, as rebels surrounded the capital, Monrovia, demanding the resignation of President Charles Taylor. This trip was to earn her the 2004 Pulitzer Prize, “for her cohesive, behind-the-scenes look at the effects of civil war in Liberia, with special attention to innocent citizens caught in the conflict.” She won the 2003 George Polk Award for photojournalism. In 2004, Cole was named both NPPA Newspaper Photographer of the Year for a second time, for her work in both Liberia and Iraq, and the Pictures of the Year International Newspaper Photographer by the University of Missouri’s Missouri School of Journalism. This made her the first person ever to win all three of America’s top photojournalism awards in the same year. During the year, she also spent time in Haiti, witnessing the fall of the regime of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Cole has also received the Robert Capa Gold Medal from the Overseas Press Club in both 2003 and 2004, and won two World Press Photo awards in 2004.
In 2007, she won the NPPA Newspaper Photographer of the Year.

Brooke Shaden


The goal of my photography is to make beautiful that which others find disturbing. By combining painterly qualities with a square crop, I hope to create a world unique from our reality, one that does not shut its eyes to the struggle that women are faced with, while showing the beauty in death and surrealism. While they portray whimsy, they are counterbalanced with harsh reality and themes of entrapment, anonymity, and death. They beg the question of what it means to be alive. Are these subjects alive? Were they ever?



Benjamin Lowy


Benjamin Lowy is award winning photographer based in New York City. He received a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis in 2002 and began his career covering the Iraq War in 2003. Since then he has covered major stories worldwide. In 2004 Lowy attended the World Press Joop Swart Masterclass, he was named in Photo District News 30 and his images of Iraq were chosen by PDN as some of the most iconic of the 21st century. Lowy has received awards from World Press Photo, POYi, PDN, Communication Arts, American Photography, and the Society for Publication Design. Lowy has been a finalist for the Oskar Barnak Award, a finalist in Critical Mass, included in Magenta Flash Forward 2007, as well as the OSI Moving Walls 16 exhibit. His work from Iraq, Darfur, and Afghanistan have been collected into several gallery and museum shows, and shown at the Tate Modern, SF MOMA, Houston Center for Photography, Invalides, and Arles. His work from Darfur appeared in the SAVE DARFUR media campaign.
In 2011 Lowy’s Iraq | Perspectives work was selected by William Eggleston to win the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. The book is currently available and in stores now.
In 2012, Lowy was awarded the Magnum Foundation Emergency fund to continue his work in Libya. In the same year, he received the International Center of Photography (ICP) Infinity Award for Photojournalism.
Lowy is based in New York City. He is currently editorially represented by Reportage by Getty Images.

William Eggleston


A native Southerner raised on a cotton plantation in the Mississippi Delta, Eggleston has created a singular portrait of his native South since the late 1960s. After discovering photography in the early 1960s, he abandoned a traditional education and instead learned from photographically illustrated books by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Robert Frank. Although he began his career making black-and-white images, he soon abandoned them to experiment with color technology to record experiences in more sensual and accurate terms at a time when color photography was largely confined to commercial advertising. In 1976 with the support of John Szarkowski, the influential photography historian, critic, and curator, Eggleston mounted “Color Photographs” a now famous exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. William Eggleston’s Guide, in which Szarkowski called Eggleston’s photographs “perfect,” accompanied this groundbreaking one-person show that established his reputation as a pioneer of color photography. His subjects were mundane, everyday, often trivial, so that the real subject was seen to be color itself. These images helped establish Eggleston as one of the first non-commercial photographers working in color and inspired a new generation of photographers, as well as filmmakers.


Garry Winogrand

Imagen 468

Garry Winogrand was a street photographer from the Bronx, New York, known for his portrayal of American life, and its social issues, in the mid-20th century. Though he photographed in Los Angeles and elsewhere, Winogrand was essentially a New York photographer. He received three Guggenheim Fellowships to work on personal projects, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and published four books during his lifetime. He was one of three photographers featured in the influential New Documents exhibition at Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1967 and had solo exhibitions there in 1969, 1977 and 1988. He supported himself by working as a freelance photojournalist and advertising photographer in the 1950s and 1960s, and taught photography in the 1970s. His photographs featured in photography magazines including Popular Photography, Eros, Contemporary Photographer and Photography Annual. Photography curator, historian, and critic John Szarkowski called Winogrand the central photographer of his generation. Critic Sean O’Hagan, writing in The Guardian in 2014, said “In the 1960s and 70s, he defined street photography as an attitude as well as a style – and it has laboured in his shadow ever since, so definitive are his photographs of New York.” Phil Coomes, writing for BBC News in 2013, said “For those of us interested in street photography there are a few names that stand out and one of those is Garry Winogrand, whose pictures of New York in the 1960s are a photographic lesson in every frame.” At the time of his death Winogrand’s late work remained undeveloped, with about 2,500 rolls of undeveloped film, 6,500 rolls of developed but not proofed exposures, and about 3,000 rolls only realised as far as contact sheets being made.


Giuliano Bekor

Giuliano Bekor I


Internationally recognized photographer, Giuliano Bekor, holds a portfolio that includes work from the realms of fashion, beauty, celebrity, advertising, and fine art. Giuliano’s photography has been featured in top publications around the globe, and his client list includes an endless file of beauty industry leaders, advertising agencies, celebrities, producers, and artists. With 30 years in the industry, Giuliano has perfected his craft to an exceptional level of expertise. Composed of light, color, space and form, Giuliano brings ideas conceptualized in his own imagination into reality throughout his work. Currently living between New York and Los Angeles, Giuliano is often on the move traveling for work and inspiration. Always the restless visionary, he ceases to continually express his fresh and nuanced style



Keith Goldstein


Keith Goldstein was born in Brooklyn, New York. Keith was interested in art for as long as he can remember, with his mother being his biggest influence and supporter, encouraging him in his earliest artistic endeavors. Keith’s first connection with photography came about in high school when he was given a collection of photography magazines to draw from. Instead, he began to read them, becoming extremely fascinated with the medium. It wasn’t until he dropped out of college after his second year, and was working in a warehouse, that he decided on photography as a means to creative expression. Keith began studies at night school with David Attie and moved into New York City, receiving his BFA with Honors in photography from the School of Visual Arts. It was there, working with Tad Yamashiro, that he began to experiment with a more emotive way of expression. Wanting to explore this further, Keith went on to continue his experimentation with Carl Toth at Cranbrook Academy of Art. After receiving his MFA in Photography, he moved back to New York City and began, through a course of personal experiences, to unravel everything that he knew and was for the next 15 years of his life. Keith has been exhibiting his work since 1980. His work has been published in many publications including – ABC News Australia, Now Public, Flak Magazine, JPEG Magazine, File Magazine, Snaps Magazine, SHOTS, Boulevard, Mercury Records, Diversion Magazine, Cadillac Motors, I Magazine, Penquin/Putnam, Simon & Shuster, St. Martin’s Press, and on many book covers. Keith’s tools to finding his place and exploring his feelings towards the world have always been simple – one camera and a couple of lenses. “Being unencumbered does allow you the most freedom”, he says. Keith has been making his living as fine art photographer, a stock shooter, a corporate event photographer, and a photo editor.

Ashley Lebedev


Ashley Lebedev is a 27 year old Fine Art Photographer, specializing in Conceptual Portraiture & Moodscapes. She’s also a writer and neoclassical or contemporary narratives often accompany her pieces. After briefly attending school for Commercial Photography, Ashley quickly chose to venture away from conventional photographic style and developed a taste for telling stories through her photographs.

“I want every piece I create to evoke a dormant memory or to relay a lingering message. I love drawing upon one’s own memories, by stirring them up a bit, or by recreating ideals that hit a sleeping chord within the viewer. Photography is my bittersweet journal & the visual aftermath of a fragmented life. I hope you enjoy these pieces of me. They are all there.”

Ashley currently resides in the United States and shoots exclusively on location, upon a 12 acre farm. Most of her work is created working with all natural light & organic elements found within nature, while placing a continued emphasis towards designing historical characters and fantasy worlds

Edward Ysais






Consuelo Kanaga

Consuelo Kanaga - [Untitled] (Horse Drawn Wagon) 1922

Consuelo Kanaga, one of the pioneers of modern American photography, began her career as a photojournalist in 1915 in San Francisco. In the 1920s, Alfred Stieglitz inspired her to develop a more aesthetic approach, and a trip to Europe in 1928 awakened her lifelong preoccupation with European modernist painting and the ways in which that work was influenced by the sculpture of Africa. Kanaga successfully combined a Pictorialist aesthetic with a realist strategy, producing handsomely composed and carefully printed images. She was one of few white American photographers in the 1930s to make artistic portraits of African Americans.

In Frances with a Flower, the focus is so sharp that the slightly rough texture of the woman’s skin, shiny with perspiration at the hairline, seems palpable. The forehead, nose, and cheeks, highlighted by flash, contrast with the deep-set eyes lost in shadow, thus producing a sculptural dimension that turns the photograph into hills and valleys of light. The stark white blossom pressed to the woman’s nose emphasizes the sensuality of her face.

Helen Levitt



Helen Levitt (August 31, 1913 – March 29, 2009) was an American photographer. She was particularly noted for “street photography” around New York City, and has been called “the most celebrated and least known photographer of her time”.

James Whitlow Delano

Kabuli boys show off their captive bird in the old city, Afghanistan.

I’ve always been strongly affected by the environment, since I was a young child living beside a nuclear research lab in California.  It was not outside of town but in it.  Sometimes we’d hear, and feel, open-air explosions, some of which, I would learn later, contained depleted uranium.  It was the height of the Cold War and people did not ask many questions then.  At 7, we moved to the industrial New York City metropolitan area.  Industrial contamination was so close to our leafy neighborhood, the wind sometimes carried fumes from refineries shattering our Rockwellian pretensions.  Early on, I hatched a plan to move back westward away from the city to where there were mountains and forests; to the Rockies, then California again before landing in Tokyo. Naturally, I suppose, I became a documentary storyteller and a collector of visual evidence from my base in Asia for the past 2 decades.  The documentary work focuses on humanity’s relationship with the environment and the ecological consequences of rapid development in East Asia, including violations of indigenous land and human rights.  On the street, an “out of the corner of the eye” immediacy drives the work to peer beneath the surface at what is unspoken.

The work has been published and exhibited throughout the world and led to four monograph photo books, the first being “Empire: Impressions from China” and the latest on the “Black Tsunami: Japan 2011” on the epoch-changing triple disaster in Japan.  Projects have been cited with the Alfred Eisenstadt Award (from Columbia University and Life Magazine), Leica’s Oskar Barnack, Picture of the Year International, NPPA Best of Photojournalism, PDN and others for work from China, Japan, Afghanistan and Burma (Myanmar), etc.  In 2015, I founded EverydayClimateChange (ECC) Instagram feed, where photographers from 6 continents document global climate change on 7 continents. ECC bears witness that climate change is not happening “over there” but it is also happening right here and right now.  ECC is not a western view on climate change because photographers come from the north, the south; the east and the west; and are as diverse as the cultures in which we were all raised.


Rodney Smith



Andrea Star Reese

from the series Chasing Stigma

Andrea Star Reese is a VISURA photojournalist/documentary photographer based in New York, Seattle, and Jakarta.

Recent work includes:

DISORDER (2011-2016), a five-year documentary reportage on abuse against people with psychosocial disabilities in Indonesia was first exhibited and screened at Visa Pour L’Image Perpignan, and Angkor Photo Festival in 2013. In 2016 Images from the essay were used by Human Rights Watch in the 2016 report LIVING IN HELL and as part of the Break The Chains Campaign against shackling.. Disorder was a 2014 finalist for the Manual Rivera-Ortiz Grant and included in American Photography 28: Best pictures from 2011.

URBAN CAVE (2007-2014), a seven-year documentary reportage on unsheltered men and women living underground in New York City was first exhibited at Visa Pour L’Image 2010 where it was a Visa d’Or, Feature nominee. Most recently photographs from Urban Cave were exhibited at Musee de L’Elysee, Lausanne and are part of the museum’s collection. The project received the 2014 David Pike Award for Excellence in Journalism_Photography, and Best Social Documentary from The 2009 New York Photo Festival. Urban Cave was awarded 2nd place from 2014 Kontinent Awards and in 2011, a second place Fotovisura Award. Urban Cave was a finalist for both the 2013 FotoEvidence book award and 2011 POYI: World Understanding Award among other recognitions. The series was included in several exhibitions for FotoEvidence and ReGeneration 2 and exhibited at Theory of the Clouds Gallery, Kobe, Japan, and the 2013 Athens Photo Festival.

The Urban Cave Photo Book, edited by Alison Morley was published in 2015 by FotoEvidence. 

Ms Reese began her career as a filmmaker in 1983 and transitioned to Photojournalism/Documentary Photography in 2007. On staff at the International Center of Photography School, and a tutor at the 2013 Angkor Photo Festival Workshop, Andrea Star Reese is a 2010 fellow in Photography from the New York Foundation for the Arts and a reGeneration2 photographer.

Images from Disorder and Urban Cave have received wide International coverage in print, wire, and media publishing.

Published credits include:

Al Jazeera, AJ+, CNN,, Sidney Morning Herald, BBC News Alerts, The Guardian,, Huffington Post, El Dario, Goteborgs Posten, Irish Examiner, El CIUdadano, Feature Shoot, Business Insider,, Vogue.It, Kompas, Jakarta Post, Media Indonesia, Neue Zucher Zeitung, Le Monde, Liberation, New York Times Lens Blog, Alternatives Internationales, Sunday Times Magazine, Paris Match, The Fader, Le Loop, NPR, Fiasco

Louise Dahl-Wolf


I believe that the camera is a medium of light, that one actually paints with light. In using the spotlights with reflecting lights, I could control the quality of the forms revealed to build a composition. Photography, to my mind, is not a fine art. It is splendid for recording a period of time, but it has definite limitations, and the photographer certainly hasn’t the freedom of the painter. One can work with taste and emotion and create an exciting arrangement of significant form, a meaningful photograph, but a painter has the advantage of putting something in the picture that isn’t there or taking something out that is there. I think this makes painting a more creative medium.

Louise Dahl-Wolf


Edward Sheriff Curtis


The North American Indian

William Eugene Smith


William Eugene Smith was born in 1918 in Wichita, Kansas. He took his first photographs at the age of 15 for two local newspapers. In 1936 Smith entered Notre Dame University in Wichita, where a special photographic scholarship was created for him. A year later he left the university and went to New York City, and after studying with Helene Sanders at the New York Institute of Photography, in 1937 he began working for News-Week (later Newsweek). He was fired for refusing to use medium-format cameras and joined the Black Star agency as a freelance.

Smith worked as a war correspondent for Flying magazine (1943-44), and a year later for Life. He followed the island-hopping American offensive against Japan, and suffered severe injuries while simulating battle conditions for Parade, which required him to undergo surgery for the next two years.

Once recuperated, Eugene Smith worked for Life again between 1947 and 1955, before resigning in order to join Magnum as an associate. In 1957 he became a full member of Magnum. Smith was fanatically dedicated to his mission as a photographer. Because of this dedication, he was often regarded by editors as ‘troublesome’.

A year after moving to Tucson to teach at the University of Arizona, Smith died of a stroke. His archives are held by the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona. Today, Smith’s legacy lives on through the W. Eugene Smith Fund to promote ‘humanistic photography’, founded in 1980, which awards photographers for exceptional accomplishments in the field

Cindy Sherman





Bill Perlmutter

© Bill Perlmutter, Galerie Hilaneh von Kories [No image is to be copied, duplicated, modified or redistributed in whole or part without the prior written permission from photoselection GmbH. Fon: +49 40 4232010.]

BILL PERLMUTTER was born in New York on September 5, 1932. He began his career with a Bachelor of Arts in Motion Picture Techniques from the City College Film Institute in New York.

In 1954 after graduating from the United States Army Photography School, he spend two years in Europe as a staff photographer for the U.S. Army newspapers based in West Germany. Since then he traveled extensively all around the world as a free-lance photographer. From 1978-1997 he worked as the Vice President of Rainbow Chromes, a company specializing in photographic and digital retouching.