Katsuji Fukuda

 

Born 1899 in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Fukuda moved to Tokyo in 1919 to work at Takachiho Seisakusho (now: Olympus Corporation). Following the Great Kanto Earthquake, he moved to Osaka. In 1926, he won the Ilford Diamond Prize at the “First Japanese Photography Art Exhibition.” The following year, his attempt to establish a photography museum in Sakai (Osaka) failed, but Fukuda continued to take photography such as still life and compositions under the influence of Bauhaus aesthetics. His series “Camera Diagnostics” (published in “Asahi Camera”, 1936) was well-received, and Fukuda thus compiled “How to Photograph Women,” and other instructional books on photography. After the war, he focused on nudes, publishing “Shell of Light” (Hikari no kaigara) in 1949.

While realism became the dominant current in photography, Fukuda never gave up on his own, unique approach. In 1955, he received funding from the Canon Photo Competition to travel to Italy, and published his photographs from Italy in the next year. Books on Kyoto, Ginza and Sumidagawa followed. Since the late 1950s, Fukuda also engaged in experimental photography. In 1970, his solo exhibition “Flowers and Nudes: Fukuda Katsuji Exhibition” was held at Takashimaya Department Store in Nihonbashi (Tokyo). Fukuda passed away in 1991, aged 92. His works are held at the Yokohama Museum of Art, the Kawasaki City Museum, the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the Yamaguchi Prefectural Museum of Art and others.

The World the Children Made, Shin Noguchi

In this project, I try to express “children’s world” more realistically and more positively than Ray Bradbury’s short story “The World the Children Made”, by narrowing down the subject to children from main project “Something Here”.

When I looked their world the children of today show from time to time, I have remembered that I learned about an individual and society in there, and that “time” and that “smell” were certainly over there too. I think this time retrace own past, in other words, it may be replaced with “Save” in today’s society.

At that time, I strongly feel that I want to regain their world in the place to be, it has been removed from contemporary society and it has been rebuild in the virtual/cyber space, and it’s an essential element to form the city space that can coexist with natural environments.

Shin Noguchi is an award winning street photographer based in Kamakura and Tokyo, Japan. He describes his street photography as an attempt to capture extraordinary moments of excitement, beauty and humanism, among the flow of everyday life and has a discreet, poetic and enigmatic approach that is sensitive to the subtleties and complexities of Japanese culture without using posed/staged and no-finder/hip shot.

“Street photography always projects the “truth”. The “truth” that I talk about isn’t necessarily that I can see, but they also exist in society, in street, in people’s life. and I always try to capture this reality beyond my own values and viewpoint/perspective.”

He is also featured in MAP Talent, Liberation, The Independent, Leica Camera and many others, and you can find one of his photos on the back cover of Prestel’s new book “100 Great Street Photographs”, and he will also join photography charity for The Hepatitis C Trust in UK in October

Kansuke Yamamoto

 

The son of an amateur pictorialist photographer, Yamamoto Kansuke first studied French poetry and literature in Tokyo while he experimented with creative collages and photography influenced by European Surrealism and in particular Marcel Duchamp, René Magritte and Man Ray. At the end of the 1930s, he became a member of the avant-garde artistic movement, VOU and helped establish the Nagoya Foto Avant-Garde which encouraged innovative photography. Yamamoto Kansuke pioneered a poetic and elaborate signature style that merged European-inspired Surrealist iconography with distinctly Japanese motifs and concerns. The Japanese photographer appreciated Surrealism’s anti-establishment and anti-war positions as well as its bizarre takes on the human subconscious: ‘Artwork comes out of some disobedient spirit against readymade things of society. … Pure spirit should be a proactive spirit that attracts a new generation … Rebellion against each generation and the reformation of a generation is our purpose.’ These characteristics threatened Japanese Surrealists with imprisonment while Western members of the movement strongly denied to bestow them with legitimacy. Yamamoto Kansuke nonetheless continued to create dark and complex works that reflected on freedom – often symbolized by the birdcage motif – and war as he addressed World War II with his Premonition of Genocide

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Iwata Nakayama

Iwata Nakayama was a renowned Japanese photographer born in 1895 in Yanagawa, in Fukuoka.

His father was an inventor who held a patent of a fire extinguisher. Iwata moved to Tokyo and was educated in a private school Kyohoku-Chūgakkō. After graduating from that school, he entered Tokyo University of the Arts as a first student of its photography course. After learning artistic and commercial techniques there, he moved to the U.S. in 1918 as an overseas student of California State University, sent by Japan government. However he quit studying and began to work at a photo studio run by Tōyō Kikuchi in New York. With his practical skills, he established his own studio, Laquan Studio, in New York.

Nakayama succeeded as an artisan, and traveled around Europe with his wife Masako and his son Iwao . He stayed in Paris and he came to know Man Ray and László Moholy-Nagy and their works (but he wrote that he didn’t follow their style). And he and his family went back to Japan in 1927.

He began to work as a professional photographer in Kobe and drove Japanese Avant-garde Photo Arts. He associated Ashiya Camera Kurabu and educated some his juniors. And released some works in the magazines Asahi Camera, Nihon Shashin Nenkan and so on. Furthermore, he made one of the first commercial montage photography in 1930.

In 1932, he, Yasuzō Nojima and Nobuo Ina published their monthly magazine Kōga. This magazine was a critical turning point of Japanese artistic photography. Nakayama was a pioneer of Japanese avant-garde photography and inspired many Japanese photographers through his those works.

During World War II, he couldn’t work to the full. His works became more and more abstract. The War over, he resumed his professional work and creating new artistic pieces, but in 1949, he suddenly died (at 54). It was just a few days after he was selected as a trustee of the Japanese Photography Association.

Tatsuo Suzuki

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Quiet tokyo, Hiroharu Matsumoto

Tokyo is one of the largest metropolitan area in the world.

People who live in there have a unique loneliness, but they are always hidden in crowd of the city.

I attempted to express loneliness of metropolitan in artificial space by simple composition.

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Junku Nishimura

Born in a small coal-mine village in 1967, in Yamaguchi prefecture, western Japan, where he lived until 18. Entered college in kyoto and he studied Latin American affairs. After college performed as a club DJ, worked as a construction worker and he got a job with a cement manufacturer, worked tunnel construction sites across the country as a concrete expert. And he got a Leica and he began photographing the places he worked. After 18 years working, he quit his job and photographed countries and regions wandering around the world. He now works as a freelance photographer based in Yamaguchi

Iwase Yoshiyuki


Iwase Yoshiyuki was born in 1904 in Onjuku, a fishing village on the pacific side of the Chiba peninsula, which encloses Tokyo Bay on the east. After graduating from Meiji University Law School in 1924, he took up lifelong pursuits, heading the family sake distillery and documenting the receding traditions of coastal Japan. In the late 1920’s Yoshiyuki received an early Kodak camera as a gift. Since the main livelihood of the town came from the sea he gravitated there, and soon found a passion for “the simple, even primitive beauty” of ama – girls and women who harvested seaweed, turban shells and abalone from beneath the coastal waters..”
This way of life has now completely disappeared but Yoshiyuki’s photographs provide a stunning visual testament to these fascinating women. His total output is of a very hight standard but it is his photographs of the ama divers which are truly iconic.

Junku Nishimura

 






Born in a small coal-mine village in 1967, in Yamaguchi prefecture, western Japan, where he lived until 18. Entered college in kyoto and he studied Latin American affairs. After college performed as a club DJ, worked as a construction worker and he got a job with a cement manufacturer, worked tunnel construction sites across the country as a concrete expert. And he got a Leica and he began photographing the places he worked. After 18 years working, he quit his job and photographed countries and regions wandering around the world. He now works as a freelance photographer based in Nagoya and Yamaguchi.
Junku Nishimura, a Tokyo-based street photographer, shoots with the Leica M5, or as he likes to describe it, he’s a “midnight boozer with Leica M5.” Junku has a distinctly retro style of shooting, which reflects his own reluctance to accept change and let go of his favorite worn in possessions. He is also a member of Ante Portas , a group of photographers on Tumblr who post one image, one series or sequence from their lives each month.

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Iwase Yoshiyuki

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Iwase Yoshiyuki was born in 1904 in Onjuku, a fishing village on the pacific side of the Chiba peninsula, which encloses Tokyo Bay on the east. After graduating from Meiji University Law School in 1924, he took up lifelong pursuits, heading the family sake distillery and documenting the receding traditions of coastal Japan. In the late 1920’s Yoshiyuki received an early Kodak camera as a gift. Since the main livelihood of the town came from the sea he gravitated there, and soon found a passion for “the simple, even primitive beauty” of ama – girls and women who harvested seaweed, turban shells and abalone from beneath the coastal waters..
This way of life has now completely disappeared but Yoshiyuki’s photographs provide a stunning visual testament to these fascinating women. His total output is of a very hight standard but it is his photographs of the ama divers which are truly iconic

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Shomei Tomatsu

A photographer looks at everything, which is why he must look from beginning to end. Face the subject head-on, stare fixedly, turn the entire body into an eye and face the world.

Shomei Tomatsu

Kiyo Murakami

I was born in Shizuoka, currently based in Tokyo, Japan. After I graduated from art school, I continued experimenting with various art – illustration, design, music, etc. But I found best way to express myself through the world of photography.

I find inspiration in paintings, music, and movies – old paintings and classic picture books in particular, but my most creative ideas come from my childhood memories and dreams. Some of my work are self-portraits, something I do not consider narcissistic, but rather an adventure in self-discovery that often has the benefit of being “therapeutic” as well.

I love to make collaborative work with talented people. my friends, musicians and performers – they’re helping my creativity as well.

Kishin Shinoyama

Kishin Shinoyama’s offerings from the 1960’s not only document a decade, but are also invaluable to any survey of Tokyo photography from that period. His work reveals much about the era, depicting snapshots of the student protest movement, fashion shows, dancers, avant-garde theatre troops and of course the nude shots that would subsequently form a major motif in his oeuvre.

1960’s Japan was a politically charged place experiencing rapid economic growth under the alliance with the United States. Politics, culture, society… this was the decade when ‘possibilities’ reached a critical point as contradicting elements were forced to react with one another. The photographs emerging from the Japanese capital during this period constitute the place where this metamorphosis occurred in the most radical way, and it was in the midst of this charged atmosphere that Shinoyama was taking his photographs.

The Sixties by Kishin are a vital record of how Shinoyama rediscovered and redefined photography. This was not by using photography to critique the era, as was the case with many of his contemporaries, but by bringing a criticality to the photograph itself. Inspired by the Apollo moon landing, Shinoyama’s Death Valley photographs were arranged completely by the artist, from the models to the location of the shoot. In the photographs he positions nudes of three different races in the frontier land of the desert, and by placing foreign bodies in the form of naked human figures in the landscape, displays a classic Shinoyama technique – that of highlighting the hidden meaning in a place. His work has a fearsome, non-reflective radicalism that has continued throughout his career and that defines his imagery since the 1960’s.

Kishin Shinoyama’s work is held in private and public collections worldwide.

Ikko Narahara

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Ikkō Narahara is a Japanese photographer. Born in Fukuoka, Narahara studied law at Chuo University (graduating in 1954) and, influenced by statues of Buddha at Nara, art history at the graduate school of Waseda University, from which he received an MA in 1959

Takaki Hashimoto

I express the spirit of beauty of Japan via my photograph. I am very interested in my heritage and I am proud of it.I pursued my spirit of beauty, and I arrived at an old Japan spirit of beauty. My photograph contains the mode of expression of a Japanese picture

Uruma Takezawa

 

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In 2010, Japanese photographer Uruma Takezawa embarked on an ambitious journey to explore and document people and places in the world’s more remote corners–where people live off the land and in harmony with nature. Traveling by bus, train, on foot, by horseback and even by kayak, Mr. Takezawa traversed 103 countries on four continents in 1,021 days to fulfill a curiosity about the world’s uncharted corners.

“What inspired me was my interest in unknown worlds,” Mr. Takezawa said in an interview. “I wanted to discover and explore with my camera diverse communities that live in some of the remotest parts of our planet. It was also a personal journey of self-discovery. By traveling alone and meeting different people I also learned about myself. Through my photographs, the unknown world became the known world to me.”

Though his goal was to explore the world, Mr. Takezawa said he did not anticipate more than 1,000 days on the road–initially estimating his journey would last roughly a year. He said that after beginning in the Americas and seeing a year go by, he abandoned his plan to return so soon as he “realized that the world was so much bigger” than he originally fathomed.

“The world that I knew before I started on my journey was a small world that I had seen only through information from the media,” he explained. “The world I experienced during my travels was real. There is pain, joy and loneliness. The world is much wider and deeper than I expected.”

The resulting body of work–simply called ‘Land’–chronicles his global odyssey, from Bolivia to the Middle East, Mali to Brazil, and many other countries along the way. When the going got tough, with just a small backpack and his gear for company, Mr. Takezawa said he relied on his craft to quell his loneliness, forging ahead to make more pictures that could depict how he saw the world–as an immense place.

“This is the most important thing I learned from my journey: Width is the land and depth is the people. The moment when these two intersect, the land and the people become one. It is a moment of spiritual enlightenment. I believe that people in remote areas of the world have a much deeper connection with the land that those of us living in Western society, ” he said.

Mr. Takezawa, who recently won the Nikkei National Geographic Photo Prize, will display the work in his first U.S. exhibition at Foto-Care Gallery in New York as part of the “Shashin: Photography from Japan” festival from April 21-May 5.

As for what’s next, Mr. Takezawa will return home with the lens of his global perspective, examining his native Japan in a new light.

“The long journey was horizontal–it was very broad in scope as it involved many countries and continents. The next journey will be vertical–it will be much narrower in scope but it will be deep. It will reflect what I have learned about the world at large, about myself, and my engagement with my homeland, and with my inner soul.”

KEN KITANO








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Taichi Gondaira

Noriko Yabu

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Tomohide Ikeya

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 I’m a photographer who has a concept of “Control” for my work.
Water is one of “uncontrolled” things which the human being never can to do.
I had a lot of opportunities to think about ‘water’ with doing scuba diving in several countries as a hobby.
The beauty of sunshine viewed from under water, daily life of aquatics and me as human just be able to see their world for a moment…
We thought human could control water if we had lots of equipments and cared for risks in water, but human never be able to live in water. And we also never be able to live without water.
Water doesn’t only give a life, but also takes a life. On the other hand, water is not the Mother of Creation or the Master of Destruction, it’s just be there as ‘water’.
Water is a philosophical existence very much even be as ’just water’. I had been fascinated with water more and more and I had gotten a zeal for expression it.
It is one of reasons which I became a photographer, so I have been creating my works which has a relation with water.
I’m expressing “enthusiasm for life” by photography throughout the figure of Water and Human.

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