Jeff Liu

Zsuzsanna Dofka

Hannes Caspar

 

I’m a professional photographer based in Berlin, specialized in portrait, fashion & nude photography.
At the center of my work is the human form. What fascinates me is making the aura of a person visible with just a few means. Often the small details tell the story. I work with all the possibilities a photographer has. Lately, I prefer analogue-cameras to put my aesthetic ideas into being.  Hannes Caspar

Oliver Rath

Ever since some creative know-it-all came up with this widespread witticism, saying “One Picture is Worth Ten Thousand Words”, the necessity to say anything about Oliver Rath is basically obsolete. Year of birth (78), place of birth (Heidelberg) – who cares about it anyway? His mover/shaker-mentality, his DJing-past, his talent to translate boredom of one thing into a passion for another one – it is all nice things to say about him, but you actually don’t need to know. His DIY-enthusiasm, that built up the whole technical foundation of his existence as a photographer, his mindscape that no school in this world could have teach him, his creative lunacy that’s hidden beneath this Frankish and easy going surface – they are all pretty ornaments for writings like these, but still: anything you could say about him doesn’t come close to the impression of his pictures.
Those are pictures of a maniac. His imagery is infiltrated by codes of urban hedonism, yet ruptured by sometimes prankish, sometimes caustic humour. It is a hard and rough picture language, a language without diplomatic attachments or compromise, but fuelled with unchecked temper and elegant to subtle sense for semantics. He takes everything in that makes a good picture: geometry, contrast, perspective, arrangement. But more than that, he’s a master of those little things, that push a good picture to become an outstanding one. He is the advocate of maximizing impacts. He’ll find the big talk even in the smallest gestures. He might just slam you in the face with a picture. But he might lick your wounds with the very next one. His sense for the right sentiment is without comparison, be it on national or international scale. Call him man of the moment. What do I say? Call him a depicting chronicler of the Zeitgeist. Well, why do I say so much anyway? Just find one of his pictures and call him your new favourite photographer.

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Robert Hanley Willoughby

Bob Willoughby, whose photographs have transformed the images of Hollywood’s biggest stars, is a true pioneer of 20th century photography. He was the first “outside” photographer hired by the major studios to create photographs for the magazines, and was the link between the filmmakers and major magazines of the time, such as Life and Look. Born June 30th, 1927 in Los Angeles, his parents were divorced by the time he was born and he was raised by his mother. Bob was given an Argus C-3 camera for his twelfth birthday, providing the catalyst for what would become the key to his future. After high school, he studied cinema at night at the USC Cinema Department and design with Saul Bass at the Kahn Institute of Art. At the same time he apprenticed with a number of Hollywood photographers; Wallace Seawell, Paul Hesse, and Glenn Embree, gleaning technical and business know-how. His first magazine assignments were for Harper’s Bazaar in the early ’50s when famed art director Alexey Brodovitch became aware of his work. His career took off in 1954 when Warner Bros. asked him to photograph Judy Garland’s final scene on the set of A Star Is Born. His portrait of the freckle-faced star became his first Life cover. From then on his production was phenomenal. His images were in print literally every week for the next twenty years. As the first “special” he covered the making of over 100 films, including the 1960s movies The Graduate, My Fair Lady, Rosemary’s Baby and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. His body of work, documenting this historic era of filmmaking, is unsurpassed. He captured with wonderful perception the most famous actors and directors of the time on and off the set, in unguarded moments of repose, vulnerability and high drama. He had a unique ability to capture what was essential to each film. Sydney Pollack said in the introduction to Bob’s autobiography: “Sometimes a filmmaker gets a look at a photograph taken on his own set and sees the ‘soul’ of his film in one still photograph. It’s rare, but it happens. It happened to me in 1969, the first time I looked at the work of Bob Willoughby during the filming of They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?.” Bob also had a remarkable understanding of the needs of each individual magazine; he could be shooting for seven different publications and know exactly what each one needed in terms of editorial content and design layout. While Willoughby is most famous as the great chronicler of Hollywood, before he began covering film production he had already made an astonishing series of images of jazz musicians. Willoughby had a huge appreciation of jazz both in its technical aspects and its ability to raise the roof in performance. He had a masterful feel for the character of the artists, and he was able to convey it even in the difficult lighting conditions of recording studios and stage. He was responsible for a number of technical innovations, including the silent blimp for 35mm still cameras, which became common on film sets. He was the only photographer working on films at the time to use radio-controlled cameras, allowing him unprecedented coverage in otherwise impossible situations, and he had special brackets built to hold his still cameras on or over the Panavision cameras. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Hollywood honored Willoughby with a major retrospective exhibition of his work. He was awarded the Lucie Award for Outstanding Achievement in Still Photography in New York in 2004.

Luis Benito Ramos

Luis Benito Ramos, fotógrafo colombiano (1899-1955) introdujo la novedad del reportaje gráfico alrededor de un tema escogido libremente por él. Operaba al margen de las noticias de cada día, donde con pocas fotos desarrollaba sus temas; teñía las fotografías de cierto intimismo y las acompañaba de textos muy breves. Ramos no buscaba la noticia, sino el tema que lo conmovía humanamente y que podía, con talento, ser transformado en noticia. En ese sentido, Ramos privilegió la fotografía espontánea que le permitía retratar a la gente en la calle. Este artículo constituye uno de los primeros reportajes gráficos que Ramos publicó en Colombia.
Ramos fue reconocido en Colombia como un fotógrafo de talento excepcional. Trabajó como reportero gráfico de la revista semanal Cromos (fundada en 1916), en la cual se publican las fotografías del presente documento. Ramos nació en el seno de una familia de escasos recursos económicos, origen modesto que explica el tenor de su obra. Se formó en Bogotá como pintor de caballete. Posteriormente, en 1928, viajó a París donde empuñó la cámara fotográfica para sobrevivir, de tal suerte que se convirtió en su principal fuente de ingresos económicos. Al regresar a Colombia, en 1934, recibió el encargo de un mural.
Más por los temas que trabajó que por ser un militante, Ramos es uno de los artistas más característicos del movimiento Bachué, tendencia artística inspirada por el escultor colombiano Rómulo Rozo (1899-1965) con la obra Bachué, madre generatriz del pueblo chibcha, que dominó la escena de Colombia en los años veinte y treinta.

Florin Firimita

Florin Firimita is a visual artist, educator, and writer who traces his interest in art back to his mother’s passion for drawing and his father’s modest amateur photo lab, in Bucharest, Romania, where he was entrusted with mixing chemicals, developing film and printing black-and-white photos at the age of six. Versatile in a variety of mediums, from painting to mixed media and from writing to photography, the artist has continued to explore a wide range of creative expressions.
In 1990, the artist immigrated to the United States, where he continued his education. Today he teaches, paints, exhibits, lectures and writes art-criticism, essays and short stories. Lately, his art and his writings have been published in France, Australia, Great Britain, Argentina, and in the U.S., in MonoVisions, Dodho Magazine, Silvershotz, Mondorama, House Beautiful, The Sun, and in Andrei Codrescu’s Exquisite Corpse. The Art of Leaving, a documentary film about the artist’s life was released in 2012. The film was the official selection of seven international film festival such as Santa Fe, Durango, New York City, Chicago, and also Montreal’s 23rd Festival International du Film Sur L’Art.
In 2010, 2011, and 2013, the artist was honored at Carnegie Hall, in New York City, where, among a group of American artist teachers he was presented with three National Gold Medals from Scholastic. His work could be found in many private and public collections in Europe, Australia, and the United States. Between 1990 and 2016 he has participated in over 300 solo and group exhibits. His project, the music and spoken word album Fragments from the Salt Diaries, a collaboration with musician Marty Meyer, has been released in the United States, Europe, and Japan, in 2011. His first novel, Reliquary, will be released soon in the United States.

Ruth Orkin

Ruth Orkin was an award-winning photojournalist and filmmaker. Orkin was the only child of Mary Ruby, a silent-film actress, and Samuel Orkin, a manufacturer of toy boats called Orkin Craft. She grew up in Hollywood in the heyday of the 1920s and 1930s. At the age of 10, she received her first camera, a 39 cent Univex. She began by photographing her friends and teachers at school. At 17 years old she took a monumental bicycle trip across the United States from Los Angeles to New York City to see the 1939 World’s Fair, and she photographed along the way.

Orkin moved to New York in 1943, where she worked as a nightclub photographer and shot baby pictures by day to buy her first professional camera. She worked for all the major magazines in 1940s, and also went to Tanglewood during the summers to shoot rehearsals. She ended up with many of the worlds’ greatest musicians of the time including Leonard Bernstein, Isaac Stern, Aaron Copland, Jascha Heifitz, Serge Koussevitzky and many others.
In 1951, LIFE magazine sent her to Israel with the Israeli Philharmonic. Orkin then went to Italy, and it was in Florence where she met Nina Lee Craig, an art student and fellow American, who became the subject of “American Girl in Italy.” The photograph was part of a series originally titled “Don’t Be Afraid to Travel Alone” about what they encountered as women traveling alone in Europe after the war.

On her return to New York, Orkin married the photographer and filmmaker Morris Engel. Together they produced two feature films, including the classic “Little Fugitive” which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1953. From their New York apartment overlooking Central Park, Orkin photographed marathons, parades, concerts, demonstrations, and the beauty of the changing seasons. These photographs were the subject of two widely acclaimed books, “A World Through My Window” and “More Pictures From My Window.” After a long struggle with cancer, Orkin passed away in her apartment, surrounded by her wonderful legacy of photographs with the view of Central Park outside her window.

Citizens, Martin Ogolter

The famous ocean sides neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro’s South Zone are known the world over and are the picture postcards of the city if not the country as a whole. About 35 kilometers inland, in the North Zone of the city, far from the famous beaches these are the suburbs and the hottest neighborhoods of the city. Decidedly working class there is no tourism to be found here but there is a vibrant scene of youth culture and underlying creativity. Despite the tiny bikinis seen on the beaches of Rio de Janeiro the culture of the rich, “white” South Zone is inherently conservative and conformist with a eurocentric view of representation. In the suburbs of the North Zone the picture is another, here the countries african heritage has historically been part of everyday life and individuality is celebrated. The mainstream representation of the poorer parts of society in Rio focus on the favelas and violence, this installation of 110 quase formal portraits focuses on the joy, energy and pride of residents of those suburbs who are usually left out of the local canon of visual representation on TV, the visual arts and the news media.

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Marianne Breslauer

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Marianne Breslauer was born in Berlin on November 20, 1909. The daughter of Dorothea Breslauer and Prof. Alfred Breslauer launched her career as a photographer in 1927.
Having trained at ‘Lette–Haus’, Berlin, Breslauer travelled to Paris in 1929 where she met Man Ray. He encouraged her straight away to pursue her own photographic ideals. Magazine publications of her works in ‘Für die Frau’ and ‘Frankfurter Zeitung’ met with considerable success.
She returned to Berlin in 1930 to start work with Elsbeth Hedenhausen at the Ullstein photographic studio. In 1931 she embarked on a two–month tour of Palestine; in 1932 she left the Ullstein studio to return to Paris.
Her works were regularly published in magazines such as ‘Das Magazin’, ‘Wochenschau’, ‘Weltspiegel’ and ‘die neue linie’. In 1933 the Academia agency sent her on a photographic assignment to Spain in the company of the Swiss author Annemarie Schwarzenbach. Following the Nazi coup, Breslauer did not return to Germany but travelled to Zürich instead where she obtained work with the ‘Zürcher Illustrierte’ through Arnold Kübler, its editor-in-chief. Her photo series about the satirical revues at the ‘Pfeffermühle’ originated in this context.
Family matters prompted her return to Berlin in ca. 1934, where she initially worked for the Ullstein magazines ‘Uhu’ and ‘Die Dame’; she also published under the pseudonym ‘Ipp’ for the Kind photographic agency, and for Deutscher Kunstverlag; ‘Funkstunde’ and ‘Gebrauchsgraphik’ also published Breslauer’s photographs.
In 1936, having married art dealer Walter Feilchenfeldt, Marianne Breslauer decided to leave Germany and to immigrate to the Netherlands. In 1938 she gave up her activity as a professional photographer, embarking on new ventures instead.

Peter Lindbergh

Peter Lindbergh is a German photographer and filmmaker. He currently maintains residences in Paris, Manhattan, and Arles. Peter was born on November 23, 1944 in Leszno, Poland. He spent his childhood in Duisburg.

After a basic school education he worked as a window dresser for the Karstadt and Horten department stores in Duisburg. At 18, he moved to Switzerland. Eight months later, he went from Lucerne to Berlin and took evening courses at the Academy of Arts. He hitchhiked to Arles in the footsteps of his idol, Vincent van Gogh. After several months in Arles, he continued through to Spain and Morocco, a journey that took him two years.

Returning to Germany, he studied Free Painting at the College of Art in Krefeld. In 1969, while still a student, he exhibited his work for the first time at the Galerie Denise René – Hans Mayer. Concept Art marked his last period of interest in art. In 1971 his interest turned toward photography and for two years he worked as the assistant to the Düsseldorf-based photographer, Hans Lux.

Peter Lindbergh moved to Paris in 1978 and started working internationally for Vogue, first the Italian, then the English, French, German, and American Vogue, later for The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Allure, and Rolling Stone. His mostly black-and-white photographs, implement a pictorial language that takes its lead from early German cinema and from the Berlin art scene of the 1920s.

Clive Arrowsmith


Clive Arrowsmith is a celebrated international photographer who is based in London.
After leaving art school in North Wales, where he had studied painting and design, he attended Kingston College of Art (where he gained a first class Degree) on graduation he painted for two years. He then began taking photographs whilst working as a graphic designer for Rediffusion TV (the makers of the legendary music show Ready Steady Go!).
On leaving television to work as a photographer, he soon gained commissions from leading fashion magazines (following the delivery of a dynamic set of photos of the Paris Collections) for, most notably, British & French Vogue, Nova Magazine, Harpers, The Sunday Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Esquire U.S.A, and the F.T. “How to Spend It” luxury magazine and numerous publications world wide.
Clive continues to work in this genre in both editorial and advertising photography but is equally known for his music and celebrity images of Sir Paul McCartney, Wings, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck, George Harrison, Daniel Barenboim, Anna Netrebko, Art Garfunkel, Def Leppard, Prince Charles, Michael Caine and Damien Hirst to name just a few of the celebrated people he has photographed.
Clive is also an accomplished landscape and still life photographer with a large collection of archive images available at Camera Press London (contact Jaqui Wald on + 44 (0)207 940 9123).
Clive Arrowsmith is the only photographer to have photographed the Pirelli Calendar two years in succession, taking on the themes of Heroines and Chinese Astrology with typical enthusiasm. The Heroines calendar was also the subject of a TV documentary for Granada TV which was fronted by broadcasting legend Michael Aspel and documented the story behind the pictures, including the entire set blowing of the edge of a cliff!
Having worked on so many major stills advertising campaigns for clients like De Beers, Revlon, G.H.D. Morello, Caroline Castigliano, Lexus, Hassleblad and Yves Saint Laurent etc. Clive continued to broaden his creative scope by moving on to direct commercials. He has directed for Heinz, Revlon, Hamlet Cigars (winner of The Silver Lion Cannes Film Festival), Rapeed Sunglasses, Greenmail Whitney Beer and music videos of artists like Lee Griffiths, Jamiroquai, Jools Holland, ZTT and Def Leppard and still has ambitions to direct more documentary and film projects.
Clive has worked on the Free Tibet campaign with the Heavy Metal band, Chthonic, in Taiwan and has also photographed portraits of His Holiness the Dalai Lama several times.
Clive recently reinvigorated his long standing relationship with Japanese design legend Kansai Yamamoto (he designed the clothes for David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust incarnation) and travelled to Japan to work with Kansai photographing his new collection and filming behind the scenes at his ‘Hello Tokyo’ Super show”.
Clive was recently made a fellow of The Royal Photographic Society. His work is also included in the newly released limited edition book VOGUE Voice of The Century (Genesis Publications) and in 50 Years of Pirelli (Taschen publications).

Peter Basch

 


Peter Basch (1921 – 2004) was an American photographer. Basch was born in Berlin, Germany, the only child of Felix Basch and Grete Basch-Freund, both prominent theater and film personalities of the German-speaking world.

In 1933 the family came to New York due to fears of rising anti-Jewish sentiment and laws in Germany. The family had US citizenship because Felix’s father, Arthur Basch, was a wine trader who lived in San Francisco. After moving back to Germany, Arthur Basch kept his American citizenship, and passed it to his children and, thence, to his grandchildren.

When the Basch family arrived in New York in 1933, they opened a restaurant on Central Park South in the Navarro Hotel. The restaurant, Gretel’s Viennese, became a hangout for the Austrian expatriate community. Peter Basch had his first job there as a waiter. While in New York, Basch attended the De Witt Clinton High School. The family moved to Los Angeles to assist in Basch’s father’s career, during which time Basch went to school in England. Upon returning to the United States, Basch joined the Army. He was mobilized in the US Army Air Forces’ First Motion Picture Unit, where he worked as a script boy.

After the war, he started attending UCLA, but his mother asked him to join her back in New York. His parents had decided that Basch should be a photographer, and they obtained a photography studio for their son.

For over twenty years, Peter Basch’s had a successful career as a magazine photographer. He was known for his images of celebrities, artists, dancers, actors, starlets, and glamour-girls in America and Europe. His photos appeared in many major magazines such as Life, Look and Playboy.

Mauro De Bettio

Difficult to express, but I’m quite sure photography is for me my primary way of speaking.
In my life I had the chance to visit wonderful places and especially to meet great people.
My purpose is, and has always been, capture the feeling of what I “touch”, not just the appearance of it.
Capture the essence and express the nuances of a person in just one frame showing those subtleties that can be hard to describe in words.
Reproducing every emotion, from happiness to sadness, from fear to excitement.
Through simply showing an images, evoke an emotion in someone else, make people stop and think.
Stop them in their tracks just with a glance at an image.
Photography is a fantastic story-telling medium.
Just ask yourself what story you want to tell, and photography can get you there.

Mauro De Bettio (born March 4, 1975) lives now in Barcelona, Spain.

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Seydou Keïta

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Seydou Keïta’s photographs eloquently portray Bamako society during its era of transition from a cosmopolitan French colony to an independent capital. Initially trained by his father to be a carpenter, Keïta’s career as a photographer was launched in 1935 by an uncle who gave him his first camera, a Kodak Brownie Flash, which he had purchased during a trip to Senegal. During his adolescence Keïta mastered the technical challenges of shooting and printing; he later purchased a large-format camera. The larger format not only offered an exceptional degree of resolution, it also made it possible for Keïta to make high quality contact prints without the aid of an enlarger. In 1948 he opened his own studio in Bamako and he quickly built up a successful business. Whether photographing single individuals, families, or professional associations, Keïta balanced a strict sense of formality with a remarkable level of intimacy with his subjects. Like many professional photographers, he furnished his studio with numerous props, from backdrops and costumes, to Vespas and luxury cars. He would renew these props every few years, which later allowed him to establish a chronology for his work. Keïta commented on his studio practice, “It’s easy to take a photo, but what really made a difference was that I always knew how to find the right position, and I was never wrong. Their head slightly turned, a serious face, the position of the hands . . . I was capable of making someone look really good.”

Keïta went to exceptional lengths to bring out the beauty of his subjects and the brilliant patterns of his backdrops proved a particularly effective foil. He worked intuitively, reinventing portrait photography through his search for extreme precision. In 1962 the newly installed Socialist government made Keïta its official photographer; shortly thereafter he closed down his studio, although he remained active until his retirement in 1977. His archive of over 10,000 negatives was gradually brought to light in the early 1990s; Keïta has since achieved international recognition. Inventive and highly modern, his emphasis on the essential components of portrait photography—light, subject, framing—firmly establishes Keïta among the twentieth-century masters of the genre.

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Andrea Hübner

I was born in 1984 in a small town near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Very early in my life, I became interested in photography and soon started with sports photography (cycling). Some years later, I began to focus on people and nude photography, a sphere that began to captivate me and until now remains an inexhaustible source of inspiration. I studied French and British Studies at the university of Mainz. Photography is a passion for me, but not my profession.
Living and working near Mannheim, Germany.

Nour El Ghoumari

Nour Eddine El Ghoumari’s street photography and portraiture is considered by many critics and enthusiasts to be some of the finest photography in the world today.

His work has been the subject of discussion in some of the world’s most widely read books and photographic magazines.

A selection of his work is published in the prestigious book The World’s Greatest Black and White Photographers; globally, numerous websites profile and debate his highly influential street photography. Exhibitions from London to Japan, from the Russia to Chile, have testified to his unique appeal.

Nour Eddine has also won several International awards; Gold medal for the best portraits in the Arab world for two consecutive years, and the prestigious Photographer of the year in the UK as well as the second place in the World Colour Awards.

Norman Parkinson

I like to make people look as good as they’d like to look, and with luck, a shade better

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Arnold Newman

 

Arnold Newman is acknowledged as one of the great masters of the 20th and 21st century and his work has changed portraiture. He is recognized as the “Father of Environmental Portraiture.” His work is collected and exhibited in the major museums around the world including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Chicago Art Institute; The Los Angeles Museum of Art; The Philadelphia Museum; The Tate and the National Portrait gallery, London; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and many other prominent museums in Europe, Japan, South America, Australia, etc.

Newman was an important contributor to publications such as New York, Vanity Fair, LIFE, Look, Holiday, Harper’s Bazaar, Esquire, Town and Country, Scientific American, New York Times Magazine, and many others. There are numerous books published of Newman’s work in addition to countless histories of photography, catalogues, articles and television programs. He received many major awards by the leading professional organizations in the U.S. and abroad including the American Society of Media Photographers, The International Center of Photography, The Lucie Award, The Royal Photographic Society Centenary Award as well as France’s “Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters.” In 2005, Photo District News named Newman as one of the 25 most influential living photographers. In 2006, Newman was awarded The Gold Medal for Photography by The National Arts Club. He is the recipient of nine honorary doctorates and has lectured and conducted workshops throughout the country and the world.

Arnold Newman died on June 6, 2006 in New York City. He was 88 years old.

Trevor Cole

 

To capture people, wildlife and landscapes and the interactions between them in the light of a world in transition is to encapsulate an inimitable moment which will never again materialise. My own ‘take’ as a geographer photographer!

Born in the City of Derry in Northern Ireland and still have inextricable links to my home country. Since leaving I have lived in England, Singapore, Togo, Italy, Ethiopia, Brazil and most recently in Ireland. My photography, together with travel, have become two of my life’s passions and they in turn are an integral part of having studied Geography at University and taught it in international schools. My photography focuses on culture, landscapes and wildlife; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life.

I believe fully in the concepts of sustainable tourism and development and in trying to support a perspective which enables a greater harmony to exist between people and their environment. I often use my images to educate or enhance the knowledge of others. This has promoted not only my own areas of interest but also a genuine interest in travel to others. Considered reflections may be used to market and to disseminate and promote acquired knowledge in a stimulating way. To record an image digitally or on film certainly helps to bring the reality of such experiences to life.

I have published images in magazines, calendars and cards and presented to the Royal Geographical Society. Images have been used for educational purposes and I have exhibited in Ethiopia and Ireland. I have also reached the final of travel photographer of the year (TPOTY) in 2010 and 2011.

My Facebook page is – http://www.facebook.com/AlternativeVisionsPhotography and 500px – http://500px.com/trevcole