Mother Romania, Odeta Catana

I’m a trained professional photographer with a Master Degree in Documentary Photography from the University of Wales, Newport, UK. I have an eye for art and culture, based on an innate hunch and also on my academic background: a BA in the History and Theory of Arts and a Masters in Cultural Anthropology.

Born in Romania and currently based in Berlin, I breath, love, live and work photography.

I am a lifelong learner, I am learning to live each day differently than the day before. This is my main inspiration when I do photography.

Mother ROMANIA” depicts the state of the nation in relation with migration phenomenon nowadays, portraying three generations of women. I have chosen as a reference the community of my hometown, Calarasi, situated in Southern Romania, which is affected at different levels by the migration in the European countries, just like the whole country.

From ’89 onward the migration flow of Romanians in the Western Europe was very high, as many of them left the country, in search of a better standard of living and more financial stability. This has created several social consequences for the halves of families left at home but also for those trying to integrate in the hosting societies.

The project features three generations: the elderly and the High School girls, who are at home, in Romania, and the adult generation who has left the country reaching for a better life. The past represented by elderly women and the future by the teenagers are either too old or too young to leave abroad, while the present – the middle age active generation has left Romania for the UK, Belgium, Spain and Ireland (the countries I picked as hosting communities of my subjects). The mother-child bound, which is one of the most profound relationships, can be interpreted further as the bound with the country itself, with Romania.

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Ethiopia – East/West & Omo, John Kenny

Ethiopia can justifiably claim to be one of the most diverse countries on earth, both in terms of its geography and its cultural anthropology. I have a profound love for this country: I probably know it better than any other in Africa.

During this project I travelled from the baking Afar lowlands in the far east of the country to the humid forests of the far west, where groups including the Nuer from neighbouring Sudan have settled. Part II of my Omo Valley project is also found here.

 

Sasha Asensio

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George Hurrell

George Edward Hurrell (June 1, 1904 – May 17, 1992) was a photographer who contributed to the image of glamour presented by Hollywood during the 1930s and 1940s

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Zanele Muholi

 

A photographer and self-proclaimed visual activist, Zanele Muholi explores black lesbian and gay identities and politics in contemporary South Africa. For her series “Faces and Phases” (2006-11), Muholi photographed more than 200 portraits of South Africa’s lesbian community. “The portraits are at once a visual statement and an archive,” she has said, “marking, mapping, and preserving an often invisible community for posterity.” Muholi’s sensitive portraits challenge the stigma surrounding gays and lesbians in South Africa, debunk the common rhetoric that homosexuality is un-African, and address the preponderance of hate crimes against homosexuals in her native country. Among other subjects, she has captured the survivors of “corrective rape”. In April 2012, thieves broke into Muholi’s Cape Town apartment and stole over 20 hard drives holding years of photographic documentation, suggesting the continued controversy and sensitivity surrounding the issues that Muholi’s works confront.

Portraits of Strangers, Danny Santos

When I’m out on the streets, I often encounter faces that make me look twice; faces that stand out in the crowd without trying; faces that are out of the ordinary. They range from the exquisitely beautiful to the strangely wonderful. I started to approach these strangers for permission to take a photo of them. Some said no, but most said yes. After taking their portrait, I’d say ‘thank you’ and walk on along. I didn’t ask for their names, or where they came from, or what they do, because I wanted the viewers to see them how I saw them: as beautiful strangers.

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Vincent Peters

 

Vincent Peters was born in 1969 in Bremen, Germany. He began his career taking pictures while traveling through Thailand in the 1980´s. The pictures from this trip were later published by GEO Magazine. In 1989 he moved to New York and started working as photographer assistant. Soon after, Vincent decided to pursue his own creative vision. His work diverged from the path of commercial photography and focused on photography as fine art. The resulting body of work was exhibited extensively throughout Europe and was published in numerous portfolios in fine art periodicals. He returned to Europe in 1995 and rededicated himself to the world of fashion and celebrity photography. Since then he is based between Paris and New York.

His work has been published in international magazines such as Italian Vogue, L´Uomo, French Vogue, British Vogue, Spanish Vogue, German Vogue, Japanese Vogue, Numero, ELLE, British GQ, Italian GQ, Spanish GQ, Arena, Dazed and Confused, The Face.

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Yousuf Karsh

Man Ray


Albert Schweitzer


Pablo Casals


Grace Kelly


Joan Miró


Jacques Cousteau


Peter Lorre


Marcel Marceau


Jean Sibelius


Betty Low


Fidel Castro


Gerard Depardieu


Alfred Hitchcock


Winston Churchill

Yousuf Karsh was born in Mardin, a city in the eastern Ottoman Empire (present Turkey). At the age of 16, his parents sent Yousuf to live with his uncle George Nakash, a photographer in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Karsh briefly attended school there and assisted in his uncle’s studio. Nakash saw great potential in his nephew and in 1928 arranged for Karsh to apprentice with portrait photographer John Garo in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. His brother, Malak Karsh, was also a photographer famous for the image of logs floating down the river on the Canadian one dollar bill.
Karsh returned to Canada four years later, eager to make his mark. In 1931 he started working with another photographer, John Powls, in his studio on the second floor of the Hardy Arcade at 130 Sparks Street in Ottawa, Ontario, close to Parliament Hill. When Powls retired in 1933, Karsh took over the studio. Karsh’s first solo exhibition was in 1936 in the Drawing Room of the Château Laurier hotel. He moved his studio into the hotel in 1973, and it remained there until he retired in 1992.
Canadian Prime Minister Mackenzie King discovered Karsh and arranged introductions with visiting dignitaries for portrait sittings. Karsh’s work attracted the attention of varied celebrities, but his place in history was sealed on 30 December 1941 when he photographed Winston Churchill, after Churchill gave a speech to Canadian House of Commons in Ottawa.
Yousuf Karsh portrait of Winston Churchill on cover of Life magazine.

The image of Churchill brought Karsh international prominence, and is claimed to be the most reproduced photographic portrait in history. In 1967, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada and in 1990 was promoted to Companion.

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Florian Weiler

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Enrico Burani

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Hijas de la arena, Ana Escalera


 

 Decir fotografía es decir “magia”. Mi mayor alegría de pequeña era cuando mi padre, fotógrafo profesional, me permitía estar con él en el cuarto oscuro del laboratorio y me mostraba cómo aparecían lentamente en un papel blanco los rostros de las personas que había fotografiado en el estudio. Poco a poco a su lado aprendí todo el proceso químico de las emulsiones, el manejo de los diferentes tipos de cámaras y ampliadoras, el minucioso trabajo del retoque para conseguir esas imágenes que se convertían en la memoria histórica de cada familia.
Mi juguete favorito fue una vieja cámara de mi padre, con la que realicé mis primeras fotos en blanco y negro. Desde entonces el apasionante mundo de la fotografía me cautivó y no lo abandoné jamás.
La cámara no se separa de mi vida y sigue siendo mi fiel compañera en mis viajes para conocer otros mundos, otras culturas, otras personas y otros rostros donde también el dolor, el sufrimiento, la alegría y el amor han dejado sus huellas.

Portafolio

“Hijas de la arena”, un grito mudo en el desierto

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Mariana García

My work is a combination of disciplines, such as portrait, editorial and reportage, among others. Constantly trying to capture fascinating moments that could be translate into beautiful, elegant pieces of art,  tell stories and make them last forever.

Founder and Creative Director of P MAGAZINE (An aesthetic object-book designed as a collector´s edition, published annually) Created by design studio Face and Myself.

Also co-running the studio Porcelaine Project ( A Studio conformed by photographers that offers professional services for wedding photography )

For general inquiries, new projects & prints
mariana@marianagarcia.org

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Dmitry Ageev

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Ashley Lebedev

Ashley Lebedev is a 27 year old Fine Art Photographer, specializing in Conceptual Portraiture & Moodscapes. She’s also a writer and neoclassical or contemporary narratives often accompany her pieces. After briefly attending school for Commercial Photography, Ashley quickly chose to venture away from conventional photographic style and developed a taste for telling stories through her photographs.

“I want every piece I create to evoke a dormant memory or to relay a lingering message. I love drawing upon one’s own memories, by stirring them up a bit, or by recreating ideals that hit a sleeping chord within the viewer. Photography is my bittersweet journal & the visual aftermath of a fragmented life. I hope you enjoy these pieces of me. They are all there.”

Ashley currently resides in the United States and shoots exclusively on location, upon a 12 acre farm. Most of her work is created working with all natural light & organic elements found within nature, while placing a continued emphasis towards designing historical characters and fantasy worlds

Alexandre Severo

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Ethan James Green

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Joyce Tenneson

Every so often an artist comes along who defies the easy labeling that curators and critics feel obliged to stick on everything under their rapacious gaze. In spite of lacking obvious inspirations and role models, these artists manage to create deeply felt, radical works that an extraordinary number of viewers respond to with fervor and pleasure.”
Karl-Peter Gottschalk, photography critic, on Joyce Tenneson

Tenneson is among the most respected photographers of our time, and has been described critically as “one of America’s most interesting portrayers of the human character.” Her work is a combination of portraiture and mythology-she is interested in discovering the archetypes of our being.

Tenneson’s work has been shown in over 150 exhibitions worldwide, and is part of numerous private and museum collections. Her photographs have appeared on countless covers for magazines such as: Time, Life, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Premiere, Esquire and The New York Times Magazine. She is also a much sought-after portrait photographer with clients in Europe, Japan, and the United States.

Ms. Tenneson is the author of fifteen books. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the International Center of Photography’s Infinity Award, for best applied photography, and the 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Professional Photographers of America. In addition, she has been named “Photographer of the Year” by the international organization, Women in Photography. A recent poll conducted by American Photo Magazine voted Tenneson among the ten most influential women photographers in the history of photography. Joyce lives and works in Rockport, Maine.

Tenneson’s portraits go beyond a surface recording of her subject’s likeness. Her signature-style images attempt to show the inner person who hovers behind the facade. Says Tenneson: “I want to allow others to reveal and celebrate aspects of themselves that are usually hidden. My camera is a witness. It holds a light up for my subjects to help them feel their own essence, and gives them the courage to collaborate in the recording of these revelations.”

Nadezhda Shibina

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Danielle van Zadelhoff

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Felicity Ingram

 

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