Jeremy Piper

Jeremy Piper grew up on the Northern beaches of Sydney on the East Coast of Australia. Studying photography at High School and immersing himself in the darkroom at an early age led him on a path of wonderment ever since.
Beginning his career as a ‘copyboy’ in the ever shifting sands of print journalism in 1989 at News Ltd in Sydney tutored him about life and the media, a long way from telling his father, a policeman and artist that working for a newspaper was going to be “taking photographs of cats up trees”.
Three decades on his work continues to explore the connection between exponential growth of population in Australia and the effect on the environment with his work on Badgery’s Creek “In the name of progress”.
His work on the Ship Graveyards of India bares witness to the impact of man on the environment whilst giving dignity to the workers amongst the mudplains of Gudjarat. His work was published widely in the book ‘The Human Condition”.
The natural devastation inflicted on Vanuatu from Tropical Cyclone Pam and his work from the East Timorese referendum received many accolades. He has recently been commissioned by National Geographic and Fox to document Tokyo, Japan as part of a Tokyo 2020 multimedia piece. Piper’s work is held in institutional collections and has been widely exhibited throughout regional Australia and parts of France.
He is a co-founding member of Oculi, an Australian based collective of visual storytellers offing a narrative of contemporary life, Piper balances family life between Sydney the Asian Pacific Regions.

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Nick Moir

Moir’s passion is capturing the dramatic environmental phenomena of Australia, from its ragged lightning and dust storms and blackening bushfires to the devastating effects of climate change.He received a World Press Photo award for coverage of the destructive 2002-03 bushfire season and Australian Press Photographer of the Year in 2002 for a series on Sydney’s severe weather.Moir recently completed his photo essay, Last Day on Earth, a look at the massive storms of America’s Tornado Alley.In 2009 he was named International Environmental Photographer of the Year in the Changing Climates category, an annual prize of the University of Westminster, for his image Microburst and Dust Storm.Moir was winner of the South Australian Museum’s ANZANG Nature Photography competition for his evocative image of a bushfire bearing down on a town in south-east NSW which was also included in Prix Pictet’s Earth last year.Moir was recently commissioned by GEO to photograph storms in Australia’s tropical north. He lives in Sydney and works for The Sydney Morning Herald.He is a founding member of Oculi. He is currently the chief photographer of The Sydney Morning herald.

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Claire Martin

Claire Martin  began her career by studying a degree in Social Work, however, she changed her focus to Photography when she realised that change can also be effected through this medium. Since beginning her career pursuing personal projects in 2007, she has focused her lens on marginalised communities within prosperous nations creating works that blend the genres of documentary, art and photography.
The real impact behind Claire’s photographs comes from her critical analysis of sociocultural and ecological relationships and her drive to simplify and communicate these ideas to a greater public through complex yet bold single images. The engaged critical thinking behind her images is evidenced through her accompanying writing and her regular engagement with teaching, public speaking and jurying. Beyond the still image Claire is preoccupied with the power of story telling in any medium. She lectures in photo media at Edith Cowan University and is routinely invited to speak about photography and journalism at galleries and industry festivals

James Brickwood

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Mihai Florea


I’m a passionate photographer from Melbourne, Australia.
I consider myself a minimalist photographer mainly because I like to use only what I need to create an image I love. It fits like a glove to my personality and my life philosophy.
I also like to use long exposure techniques to create that sense of reality and to allow the flow of nature to be visible in my images.
Most of my work is in black and white because I love how I can use light, tones and shades to mold an image, a bit like clay sculpting. As a result, I can create images which are strong and powerful, with high contrast or soft and gentle.

Harold Cazneaux

Harold Cazneaux (30 March 1878 – 19 June 1953) was an Australian pictorialist photographer; a pioneer whose style had an indelible impact on the development of Australian photographic history. In 1916, he was a founding member of the Pictorialist Sydney Camera Circle. As a regular participator in national and international exhibitions, Cazneaux was unfaltering in his desire to contribute to the discussion about the photography of his times. He created some of the most memorable images of the early twentieth century.

 

 

Trent Parke

 


Trent Parke, the first Australian to become a Full Member of the renowned Magnum Photo Agency, is considered one of the most innovative and challenging photographers of his generation. Moving beyond traditional documentary photography, Parke’s work sits between fiction and reality, offering an emotional and psychological portrait of family life and Australia that is poetic and often darkly humorous.

Parke

 

Trent Parke


Trent Parke was born in 1971 and raised in Newcastle, New South Wales. Using his mother’s Pentax Spotmatic and the family laundry as a darkroom, he began taking pictures when he was around 12 years old. Today, Parke, the only Australian photographer to be represented by Magnum, works primarily as a street photographer.
In 2003, with wife and fellow photographer Narelle Autio, Parke drove almost 90,000 km (56,000 miles) around Australia. Minutes to Midnight, the collection of photographs from this journey, offers a sometimes disturbing portrait of twenty-first century Australia, from the desiccated outback to the chaotic, melancholic vitality of life in remote Aboriginal towns. For this project Parke was awarded the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography.
Parke won World Press Photo Awards in 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2005, and in 2006 was granted the ABN AMRO Emerging Artist Award. He was selected to be part of the World Press Photo Masterclass in 1999. Parke has published two books, Dream/Life in 1999, and The Seventh Wave with Narelle Autio in 2000. His work has been exhibited widely. In 2006 the National Gallery of Australia acquired Parke’s entire Minutes to Midnight exhibition.

Rennie Ellis

Rennie Ellis, photographer and author, who with his images and words has taunted, titillated and tickled our collective fancies for years, has left behind a treasure trove of over half a million images spanning over three decades.

Ellis’ photography has concentrated on documenting both popular culture and the demi-monde and examining Australia as a hedonistic society. In his own intuitive way he was committed to capturing on film those moments in time that offer insights into the human condition.

Christopher Tovo

Born in Townsville, Australia in 1972, Christopher’s fascination for photography and art started at a very young age through the influence of his Italian father, Peter Tovo. Peter was a photographer who trained in Italy under Fornasa Tarcisiso before migrating to Australia.

As Christopher grew, so did his curiosity for his father’s camera collection. One day, to his father’s dismay, Christopher decided to dismantle one of the cameras, to ‘find out what happens inside’. Peter sent Christopher to the library with a list of three names. Richard Avedon, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa were the subjects of his homework and they proved to have an everlasting effect, along with many years of mentoring from his father.

Christopher attended photography school, albeit briefly. Traditional scholastic methods weren’t to his liking. Instead he took to apprenticing, which gave him a well-rounded education in photography and showed him how to apply his knowledge in the real world. He hasn’t looked back since.

Christopher’s scope as a photographer is both broad and deep. His uncomplicated, ‘gut instinct’ approach to his work exposes a subtle appreciation for life in all its diversity. A classicist at heart, Tovo subconsciously seeks out the timelessness in any given situation presented to him.

Tovo’s strengths lie in Portraiture and Reportage. He was a finalist in the 2006 Archibald Prize and has been commissioned by the Vatican, in conjunction with the Mary MacKillop Foundation, to photograph Pope John Paul II. Merely casting a quick glance over the many people and locations he has documented display his talent for engaging with his subjects and their environments, no matter how foreign.

Christopher has had a highly successful career as a commercial photographer, proving his ability to meld the worlds of art and commerce. His extensive client list includes: Rolling Stone, Nike, The Australian Ballet; Coca-Cola; Fosters; Crown Lager; Foxtel; The Sydney Morning Herald; Universal Records; Myer; Levi’s; Vodafone; Jack Daniels; The Australian Defence Force; Canon; The National Australia Bank; The Commonwealth Bank; Tennis Australia; Ford Motors; The Australian Football League; Schweppes; Qantas; Holden; and Adidas, to name a few.

A retrospect of Christopher’s career has appeared in Australian Photography Magazine. He has also been invited to speak at schools, universities and photography colleges in both Sydney and Melbourne. In 2010 Christopher’s famous “Leopard on Toilet” shot earned him two honourable mentions in the 2010 International Photography Awards. In 2011 Capture Magazine named him fashion photographer of the year.

Christopher’s debut as director and cinematographer for “The Tradesman Series” saw him as a finalist in the prestigious One Show Awards in NYC, a screening at the New York Surf Film Festival, Byron Bay surf film festival and finalist in both Best Director and Best Cinematographer at The Melbourne Advertising and Design Club Awards. In 2013 Christopher received an honourable mention at the International Photography Awards for his ‘Corona’ series as well as Capture Magazine placing him in the top 5 travel photographers in Australia and New Zealand. In 2014 “Mark of a Champion” featuring Rod Laver earn’t a Grand Clio (the award show’s highest honour). Plus three New York Festival finalists and a highly commended in ADMA Print category in Australia. That same year Christopher also won a Gold Lion at Cannes for his print contribution to the RSL “Minute of Silence” campaign.

Russell James


 

 

 

Over the past two decades photographer Russell James’ images have become synonymous with provocative, unique perspectives of many of the most prominent people of our time in the worlds of entertainment, fashion and beauty. He is renowned as an international Vogue cover photographer and his works have appeared in many leading publications such as W, Vogue, Allure, Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, American Photo, French Photo and Sports Illustrated. James’ works are the subject of five fine-art books of his solo works including ‘Russell James’ (2009), ‘Nomad Two Worlds’ (2010), ‘V2’ (2011), ‘A Virgin Island’ (2013) and ‘Angels’ (2014) all published by world leading art book publisher teNeues Publications. The books have achieved critical acclaim and mass popularity, appearing on multiple best-seller lists. They are published in more than seventy countries around the world.
In August of 2007 James was awarded the Hasselblad Masters Award, and in 2009 he joined the prestigious ranks of Irving Penn and Helmut Newton as a resident artist of Camera Work, the world’s leading gallery for contemporary photography and vintage master works.
Russell’s diverse photographic achievements range from exhibiting for brands such as Hermes in association with Guggenheim, to breakthrough advertising campaigns for global brands such as Rolex, Victoria’s Secret, Evian and Revlon, to emotional portraits of many of the world’s leading celebrities, musicians and supermodels, such as Scarlett Johansson, President Bill Clinton, Halle Berry, Faith Hill, Rihanna, Kendall Jenner and a host of others. He has been the subject of solo photographic exhibitions in New York, Berlin, Los Angeles, Sydney, Aspen, The Hamptons, Oslo among other cities.
Russell’s fine art project entitled Nomad Two Worlds, a series inspired by the global consequences of cultural collision, has been recognized and lauded by critics and fans alike. Nomad Two Worlds is informed both by Australia’s ancient past and by an unfolding, present-day political narrative. It has become a global example of reconciliation in action. Since its launch in New York City in 2009 with the support of Donna Karan, Hugh Jackman and the Australian Government, the collection has previewed in the national gallery of Victoria and lead to the forming of ‘Nomad Two Worlds Foundation’ in 2012. The Foundation provides grants and supports artists in indigenous and marginalized communities around the world.
His eye originally inspired by the rich natural location of his home lands in Western Australia, James developed his cutting edge and provocative fashion style in the cities of London, Paris, Tokyo, Stockholm and Milan in the years 1987 to 1996 creating a unique blend of fashion and extreme location as his signature trademark. Known for his love of the environment, social activism and dramatic architecture, James is often found shooting in locations ranging from the shores of the Caribbean beaches, to the outback of Australia, to the ice flows of the Arctic Circle to the more civilized realm of designer homes and studios in the major cities of New York, Los Angeles, London and Paris.

Anton Bruehl

 

 

 

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Anton Bruehl studied engineering at the Christian Brothers School in Melbourne before emigrating to the United States in 1919 to accept a job with Western Electric. An exhibition of photographs at the Clarence H. White School in New York inspired him to give up engineering for photography. He enrolled in White’s school in 1924-25, and soon became a teaching assistant for White in New York and Canaan, Connecticut. After Vogue published his photographs in 1926, Bruehl dedicated himself to freelance commercial photography by establishing a New York studio, which was active from 1927 through 1966. His photographs appeared in Vogue, Vanity Fair, and other prominent publications, and his work was shown in major international exhibitions, such as Film und Foto at the Deutscher Werkbund in Stuttgart (1929) and Photography 1839-1937 at the Museum of Modern Art. His best-known body of work produced outside the studio was published as Mexico (1933), a book of black-and-white photographs of life and people in Mexican towns.

Bruehl is noted for the color photography he produced in the 1930s for Condé Nast, which at that time had a virtual monopoly on the color printing process. Fernand Bourges, a color technician at Condé Nast Engravers, developed a four-color separation transparency process in 1932 that allowed the company to print color images in its publications on a regular basis. This collaboration–Bruehl’s color photographs, Bourges’s color transparencies, Condé Nast’s printing–accounted for the majority of color images that appeared in print in the mid-1930s. Besides his innovative color photography, Bruehl was recognized for his stylish advertising still lifes, and for the celebrity portraiture and fashion photography he did for Vogue during the 1930s.

Rennie Ellis

Rennie Ellis, photographer and author, who with his images and words has taunted, titillated and tickled our collective fancies for years, has left behind a treasure trove of over half a million images spanning over three decades.

Ellis’ photography has concentrated on documenting both popular culture and the demi-monde and examining Australia as a hedonistic society. In his own intuitive way he was committed to capturing on film those moments in time that offer insights into the human condition.

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Max Dupain

Max Dupain was Australia’s most respected and influential black & white photographer of the 20th century. His images capture a long gone era in which Australian society was vastly different from what it is now. With his documentary eye his images exude quality and demonstrate Dupain’s mastership of light and form.

Dupain was considered the pioneer of modernism in Australian photography, an approach that departed from the sentimentality of soft focused, nostalgic imagery to the simplified world of light contrasts, sharp focus, varying angles and creative compositions.

Jarrod Castaing

Jarrod Castaing is an internationally award-winning fine art landscape photographer specialising in nature photography and fine art prints from USA, UK, Australia and around the world. Having been fortunate enough to travel through over 35 countries (and counting!), his passion is capturing those moments of light that only last for a few minutes, twice a day.

Carol Jerrems

Carol Jerrems was an Australian photographer. Jerrems studied photography at Prahran College 1967-70. She is mainly known for documenting the counter-culture spirit of Melbourne in the 1970s.

Jenny Papalexandris

“What is real is not the external form, but the essence of things… it is impossible for anyone to express anything essentially real by imitating its exterior surface” Constantin Brancusi, Sculptor.

Jenny Papalexandris is a Visual Artist based in Australia. She holds a Master of Art (1997) and a Bachelor of Education (Art) 1987 from the University of NSW in Sydney. She works across three main disciplines; Photography, Sculpture and Painting. She has established a visual language that allows her to extend her ideas across all three mediums.

The photography of Jenny Papalexandris explores a subjective response to the world of light and shadow. The photographs are highly expressive and visually commanding. Thematically rich and diverse, her photography is imbued with a strong sense of poetry, symbolism and metaphor.

Her work as a Sculptor investigates her immediate natural environment. The sculptures are part of an ongoing investigation which explore organic growth and the structure of form. Her intention is to create work which speaks about the air, the salt, the clouds, the sea, the leaves and the earth. She aims to transcend physical resemblances and truly abstract felt experience to create essential forms.

Painting further consolidates and refines the scope and ideas within the work. Her paintings can be deeply saturated with colour and luminosity. In them one traces the lyrical outlines and moods of a landscape. The common thread in her work is the impulse to ‘sense’ rather than ‘see.’ Her work reveals a singular vision explored with rigour and sensitivity, both visually and conceptually.

Jenny Papalexandris continues to exhibit both nationally and internationally. She has been the recipient of numerous Art Awards. Her work has been included in various publications and media.
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Nepal, Leïla Joy Berney

“I hope this website will take you on adventures and offer you a peek at the world through my eyes.”

22 years old and based in Sydney, Leïla has completed a Bachelor of Communications in Journalism and internships at both Australian Geographic and a specialised agency of the United Nations. Leïla is available for freelance work both for photography and writing.

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Vasil Boglev

This is Vasil Boglev’s sitehe does work in black & white and color. Some of his main topics are: Australia, Macedonia, World, and Choices. These are very impressive shots. They all tell a story in a single click of the shutter. That is what I find so amazing about photojournalism, is that an entire story can be seen in a glimpse. One photograph can be studied and interpreted several different ways by different people

Peter Coulson

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